16

DataFrame I have:

            A   B   C 
2012-01-01  1   2   3 
2012-01-05  4   5   6 
2012-01-10  7   8   9 
2012-01-15  10  11  12 

What I am using now:

date_after = dt.datetime( 2012, 1, 7 )
frame.ix[date_after:].ix[0:1]
Out[1]: 
            A  B  C
2012-01-10  7  8  9

Is there any better way of doing this? I do not like that I have to specify .ix[0:1] instead of .ix[0], but if I don't the output changes to a TimeSeries instead of a single row in a DataFrame. I find it harder to work with a rotated TimeSeries back on top of the original DataFrame.

Without .ix[0:1]:

frame.ix[date_after:].ix[0]
Out[1]: 
A    7
B    8
C    9
Name: 2012-01-10 00:00:00

Thanks,

John

30

You might want to go directly do the index:

i = frame.index.searchsorted(date)
frame.ix[frame.index[i]]

A touch verbose but you could put it in a function. About as good as you'll get (O(log n))

1
29

Couldn't resist answering this, even though the question was asked, and answered, in 2012, by Wes himself, and again in 2015, by ajsp. Yes, besides 'truncate', you can also use get_loc with the option 'backfill' to get the nearest date after the specific date. By the way, if you want to nearest date before the specific date, use 'ffill'. If you just want nearby, use 'nearest'.

df.iloc[df.index.get_loc(datetime.datetime(2016,2,2),method='backfill')]
2
  • 5
    This is the answer I want. But it looks like "nearest" might return a previous row. "backfill" seems to return the closest after.
    – Ian
    Jun 21 '17 at 1:06
  • 1
    You cheeky monkey.
    – ajsp
    Apr 12 '21 at 14:52
8

Couldn't resist answering this, even though the question was asked, and answered, in 2012, by Wes himself. Yes, just use truncate.

df.truncate(before='2012-01-07')

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.