35

Can a custom event be created for any object method?
To do this do I just use the following syntax?:

myObject.myMethod +=new EventHandler(myNameEvent);

The following code has prompted this question:

   private void btRunProcessAndRefresh_Click(object sender,EventArgs e)
    {
        myProcess =new Process();
        myProcess.StartInfo.FileName = @"c:\ConsoleApplication4.exe";
        myProcess.Exited += new EventHandler(MyProcessExited);
        myProcess.EnableRaisingEvents =true;
        myProcess.SynchronizingObject =this;
        btRunProcessAndRefresh.Enabled =false;
        myProcess.Start();
    }
6
  • 3
    check out the MSDN example of events as well
    – Default
    Mar 27 '12 at 8:05
  • note that myProcess.Exited += MyProcessExited; is enough.
    – Default
    Mar 27 '12 at 8:15
  • @Default ahhhh ....so I could either have myProcess.Exited +=new EventHandler(MyProcessExited); OR I could declare the event and then use myProcess.Exited += MyProcessExited; ?
    – whytheq
    Mar 27 '12 at 10:59
  • yes, the new EventHandler() is redundant.
    – Default
    Mar 27 '12 at 11:41
  • 1
    dont forget to mark answer asa accpeted if it works for you ... Apr 25 '12 at 6:11
45

Declare the class containing the event:

class MyClass {
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;

    public void Method() {
        OnEvent();
    }

    private void OnEvent() {
        if (MyEvent != null) {
            MyEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }
}

Use it like this:

MyClass myObject = new MyClass();
myObject.MyEvent += new EventHandler(myObject_MyEvent);
myObject.Method();
0
33

Yes you can do like this :

Creating advanced C# custom events

or

The Simplest C# Events Example Imaginable

public class Metronome
{
    public event TickHandler Tick;
    public EventArgs e = null;
    public delegate void TickHandler(Metronome m, EventArgs e);
    public void Start()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(3000);
            if (Tick != null)
            {
                Tick(this, e);
            }
        }
    }
}
public class Listener
{
    public void Subscribe(Metronome m)
    {
        m.Tick += new Metronome.TickHandler(HeardIt);
    }

    private void HeardIt(Metronome m, EventArgs e)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("HEARD IT");
    }
}
class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Metronome m = new Metronome();
        Listener l = new Listener();
        l.Subscribe(m);
        m.Start();
    }
}
6
  • 54
    that doesn't look like the simplest example to me.
    – Default
    Mar 27 '12 at 8:03
  • @Default - check first link having simplest example Mar 27 '12 at 8:05
  • Here's another "as simple as it gets" example: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa645739%28VS.71%29.aspx
    – whiteshooz
    May 16 '13 at 23:48
  • 3
    @PranayRana What is HeardIt? Jun 14 '17 at 15:48
  • @Apalabrados It's a method that's supposed to be in the Listener class, signature private void HeardIt(Metronome m, EventArgs e). If you follow the second link, it's there. Not sure why it's left out here.
    – ilasno
    Dec 12 '17 at 23:33
14

Yes you can create events on objects, here is an example;

public class Foo
{
    public delegate void MyEvent(object sender, object param);
    event MyEvent OnMyEvent;

    public Foo()
    {
        this.OnMyEvent += new MyEvent(Foo_OnMyEvent);
    }

    void Foo_OnMyEvent(object sender, object param)
    {
        if (this.OnMyEvent != null)
        {
            //do something
        }
    }



    void RaiseEvent()
    {
        object param = new object();
        this.OnMyEvent(this,param);
    }
}
3
  • 2
    I look at some of the other examples provided and they don't include "delegate" - which I've not encountered before
    – whytheq
    Mar 27 '12 at 8:12
  • 4
    when you look at the EventHandler, it is just a specific delegate.
    – daryal
    Mar 27 '12 at 8:14
  • 2
    to expound, you should only use a custom event handler delegate if you need different parameters than the ones used for EventHandler or EventHandler<>. See here for details.
    – kdbanman
    Aug 20 '15 at 0:44
7

Based on @ionden's answer, the call to the delegate could be simplified using null propagation since C# 6.0.

Your code would simply be:

class MyClass {
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;

    public void Method() {
        MyEvent?.Invoke(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}

Use it like this:

MyClass myObject = new MyClass();
myObject.MyEvent += new EventHandler(myObject_MyEvent);
myObject.Method();
1
  • 1
    And since C# 2.0 you can already simplify to myObject.MyEvent += myObject_MyEvent ;) Jul 8 '20 at 15:34
6

Yes, provided you have access to the object definition and can modify it to declare the custom event

public event EventHandler<EventArgs> ModelChanged;

And normally you'd back this up with a private method used internally to invoke the event:

private void OnModelChanged(EventArgs e)
{
    if (ModelChanged != null)
        ModelChanged(this, e);
}

Your code simply declares a handler for the declared myMethod event (you can also remove the constructor), which would get invoked every time the object triggers the event.

myObject.myMethod += myNameEvent;

Similarly, you can detach a handler using

myObject.myMethod -= myNameEvent;

Also, you can write your own subclass of EventArgs to provide specific data when your event fires.

0
4

You need to declare your event in the class from myObject :

public event EventHandler<EventArgs> myMethod; //you should name it as an event, like ObjectChanged.

then myNameEvent is the callback to handle the event, and it can be in any other class

2
  • ok but the question has been inspired by some code I'm analysing. I'll add the code to the question. I can't see any declaration.
    – whytheq
    Mar 27 '12 at 8:04
  • Well if you click on go to definition to Exited, it must be an event, and then the handling code is in MyProcessExited.
    – MBen
    Mar 27 '12 at 10:00

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