1

I have written a JUnit test for a private function which is returning String. And it is working fine.

public void test2() throws Exception
{
    MyHandler handler = new MyHandler();
    Method privateStringMethod = MyHandler.class.getDeclaredMethod("getName", String.class);
    privateStringMethod.setAccessible(true);
    String s = (String) privateStringMethod.invoke(handler, 852l);
    assertNotNull(s);
}

I have one more function which returns boolean but this is not working. But in that I am getting a compile time error saying Cannot cast from Object to boolean.

public void test1() throws Exception
{
    MyHandler handler = new MyHandler();
    Method privateStringMethod = MyHandler.class.getDeclaredMethod("isvalid", Long.class);
    privateStringMethod.setAccessible(true);
    boolean s = (boolean) privateStringMethod.invoke(handler, 852l);
    assertNotNull(s);
}

How can I run?

  • does isvalid() return boolean or Boolean? – Jim Mar 27 '12 at 10:51
  • @Jim It returns boolean. – vikiiii Mar 27 '12 at 10:53
0

The returnvalue will be 'autoboxed' to an Boolean object. Since a primitive can't be null, you mustn't test against null. Even .booleanValue() mustn't be called, because of Autoboxing.

But I'm of the same opinion as @alex.p, regarding testing private methods.

public class Snippet {

    @Test
    public void test1() throws Exception {
        final MyHandler handler = new MyHandler();
        final Method privateStringMethod = MyHandler.class.getDeclaredMethod("isvalid");
        privateStringMethod.setAccessible(true);
        final Boolean s = (Boolean) privateStringMethod.invoke(handler);
        Assert.assertTrue(s.booleanValue());
    }

    class MyHandler {
        private boolean isvalid() {
            return false;
        }
    }
}
4

I'm completely against testing private methods in isolation. Unit testing should be done against the public interface of the class (and hence inadvertently testing the private methods) as this is how it will be treated in a production environment.

I suppose there are small cases where you want to test private methods and using this method is probably correct but I certainly wouldn't put all that redundant code down whenever I came across a private method I wanted to test.

  • 2
    How does that answer the question? – Peter Mortensen Oct 27 '18 at 13:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.