21

I have a class that creates a file.

I am now doing integration tests to make sure the class is ok.

I am passing in invalid directory and file names to make sure exceptions are thrown.

In my tests are I am using:

[Test]
public void CreateFile_InvalidFileName_ThrowsException()
{
    //Arrange
    var logger = SetupLogger("?\\");

    //Act

    //Assert
    Assert.Throws<Exception>(()=> logger.CreateFile());
 }

However in this scenario the test is failing as an ArgumentException is thrown. I thought by adding just Exception it would pass.

Is there a way to make this pass just using Exception?

  • 1
    One reason why it would be a good idea to test for a specific exception is that clients of the logger will probably want to avoid having to catch the base Exception class, and will therefore rely on a particular exception being thrown, so that's what you should test for. – Ergwun Mar 27 '12 at 11:34
34

The help for Assert.Throws<> states that it "Verifies a delegate throws a particular type of exception when called"

Try the Assert.That version as it will catch any Exception:

private class Thrower
{
    public void ThrowAE() { throw new ArgumentException(); }
}

[Test]
public void ThrowETest()
{
    var t = new Thrower();
    Assert.That(() => t.ThrowAE(), Throws.Exception);
}
  • +1 as this actually answers the question, but don't ignore the good advice in other answers to test for specific exceptions. – Ergwun Mar 27 '12 at 11:31
  • If you need to check exception properties or type later you can do: var ex = Assert.Throws(Is.AssignableTo(typeof(Exception)), () => DoSomething()); – Pavel Bakshy Dec 26 '16 at 15:17
  • Using Nunit 3.6.1, I found that this answer doesn't work for me, but the answer by Adam Butler did: stackoverflow.com/a/48696428/1384748 – Breandán Dalton May 29 at 12:26
8

For NUnit 2.5 and above

// Allow both ApplicationException and any derived type
Assert.Catch<ApplicationException>(() => logger.CreateFile());

// Allow any kind of exception
Assert.Catch(() => logger.CreateFile());
  • Assert.Catch<T> solves the asked question to-the-dot and, like Assert.Throw<T>, allows one to obtain the Exception as a result: var ex = Assert.Catch<ApplicationException>(() => ..); AssertMoreOnException(ex);. – user2864740 Jan 24 '18 at 21:25
2

Your exceptions should be deterministic, and you should be able to write test cases that set up conditions under which a specific exception will be thrown, and you should test for that specific exception.

Thus, your test should be rewritten as

CreateFile_InvalidFileName_ThrowsArgumentException

and

Assert.Throws<ArgumentException>(() => logger.CreateFile());

Edit:

By the way, I think your constructor should be detecting invalid file names and throwing there. And then it should be a contract for the constructor that the file name is valid.

  • I agree but there are many odd things to think of and many exceptions likely to be thrown when creating files. I wonder if there are any pre-written integration tests already for this type of scenario – Jon Mar 27 '12 at 11:28
  • +1 As even though you don't answer the question, I agree with this advice. The types of exception your class throws form part of it's public API, and so should be tested. – Ergwun Mar 27 '12 at 11:37
  • @Jon, agreed it is a pain with the number of different types of exceptions that can be thrown by certain methods in the BCL. If your logger class wanted to be friendlier, it could catch those exceptions and throw a single exception (or at least fewer exceptions) wrapping the original as an inner exception. You'd then want to test for that exception explicitly in your automated tests. – Ergwun Mar 27 '12 at 11:40
  • @Ergwun: Sometimes the answer is "you're doing it wrong!" – jason Mar 27 '12 at 12:58
2

Throws.InstanceOf() allows you to pass a base exception type, instead of a more specific derived type.

[Test]
public void CreateFile_InvalidFileName_ThrowsException()
{
    //Arrange
    var logger = SetupLogger("?\\");

    //Act

    //Assert
    Assert.That(() => logger.CreateFile(), Throws.InstanceOf<Exception>());
}
1

Generally speaking you should only test specific exceptions to make sure your code is responding properly to different errors.

If you really need to allow any exception for the sake of your test, just use a standard try/catch block and normal Success/Failure asserts.

1

You can tag your test method with the attribute ExpectedException. That should work.

   [ExpectedException(typeof(Exception))]
    public void TestException()
    {

    }
  • After reading Roy Osherove's book I try not to use the attributes – Jon Mar 27 '12 at 11:15
  • Interesting, I've read pragmatic unit testing and they encourage using attributes (And I personally use them too). Care to elaborate why not to use them? I'd be happy about a link or blog. – Alex Mar 27 '12 at 11:22
  • I can't find it in the book now so maybe it was his TDD course tekpub.com/productions/tdd – Jon Mar 27 '12 at 11:27
  • Thank you - I'll have a look. – Alex Mar 27 '12 at 11:29
  • 2
    @Alex One disadvantage of using the ExpectedException attribute is that you can't tell if the exception was thrown in the 'arrange' part rather than the 'act' part. That's why we stopped using them in our team. – Ergwun Mar 27 '12 at 11:43
1

Write your own method and use that for validation.

/// <summary>
    /// Throwses the specified action.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="action">The action.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static T Throws<T>(Action action) where T : Exception
    {
        try
        {
            action();
        }
        catch (T ex)
        {
            return ex;
        }

        Assert.Fail("Expected exception of type {0}.", typeof(T));
        return null;
    }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.