587

In the following program you can see that each value slightly less than .5 is rounded down, except for 0.5.

for (int i = 10; i >= 0; i--) {
    long l = Double.doubleToLongBits(i + 0.5);
    double x;
    do {
        x = Double.longBitsToDouble(l);
        System.out.println(x + " rounded is " + Math.round(x));
        l--;
    } while (Math.round(x) > i);
}

prints

10.5 rounded is 11
10.499999999999998 rounded is 10
9.5 rounded is 10
9.499999999999998 rounded is 9
8.5 rounded is 9
8.499999999999998 rounded is 8
7.5 rounded is 8
7.499999999999999 rounded is 7
6.5 rounded is 7
6.499999999999999 rounded is 6
5.5 rounded is 6
5.499999999999999 rounded is 5
4.5 rounded is 5
4.499999999999999 rounded is 4
3.5 rounded is 4
3.4999999999999996 rounded is 3
2.5 rounded is 3
2.4999999999999996 rounded is 2
1.5 rounded is 2
1.4999999999999998 rounded is 1
0.5 rounded is 1
0.49999999999999994 rounded is 1
0.4999999999999999 rounded is 0

I am using Java 6 update 31.

11
  • 1
    On java 1.7.0 it works ok i.imgur.com/hZeqx.png Mar 28, 2012 at 7:44
  • 2
    @Adel: See my comment on Oli's answer, looks like Java 6 implements this (and documents that it does) in a way that can cause a further loss of precision by adding 0.5 to the number and then using floor; Java 7 no longer documents it that way (presumably/hopefully because they fixed it). Mar 28, 2012 at 7:53
  • 1
    It was a bug in a test program I wrote. ;) Mar 28, 2012 at 17:32
  • 1
    Another example that shows floating point values cannot be taken at face value. Dec 8, 2017 at 10:54
  • 1
    After thinking about it. I don't see a problem. 0.49999999999999994 is larger than the smallest representable number less than 0.5, and the representation in decimal human-readable form is itself an approximation that is trying to fool us. Dec 8, 2017 at 12:11

5 Answers 5

593

Summary

In Java 6 (and presumably earlier), round(x) is implemented as floor(x+0.5).1 This is a specification bug, for precisely this one pathological case.2 Java 7 no longer mandates this broken implementation.3

The problem

0.5+0.49999999999999994 is exactly 1 in double precision:

static void print(double d) {
    System.out.printf("%016x\n", Double.doubleToLongBits(d));
}

public static void main(String args[]) {
    double a = 0.5;
    double b = 0.49999999999999994;

    print(a);      // 3fe0000000000000
    print(b);      // 3fdfffffffffffff
    print(a+b);    // 3ff0000000000000
    print(1.0);    // 3ff0000000000000
}

This is because 0.49999999999999994 has a smaller exponent than 0.5, so when they're added, its mantissa is shifted, and the ULP gets bigger.

The solution

Since Java 7, OpenJDK (for example) implements it thus:4

public static long round(double a) {
    if (a != 0x1.fffffffffffffp-2) // greatest double value less than 0.5
        return (long)floor(a + 0.5d);
    else
        return 0;
}

1. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Math.html#round%28double%29

2. http://bugs.java.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6430675 (credits to @SimonNickerson for finding this)

3. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Math.html#round%28double%29

4. http://grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/7u40-b43/java/lang/Math.java#Math.round%28double%29

12
  • 3
    @ Oli: Oh now that's interesting, they took that bit out for Java 7 (the docs I linked to) -- maybe in order to avoid causing this sort of odd behavior by triggering a (further) loss of precision. Mar 28, 2012 at 7:46
  • 6
    @MohammadFadin: Take a look at e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_precision and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_in_the_last_place. Apr 2, 2012 at 22:27
  • 2
    I can't help but think that this fix is only cosmetic, since zero is most visible. There are no doubt many other floating point values affected by this rounding error. Dec 10, 2017 at 5:49
  • 2
    @MichaëlRoy Actually, no. It's that one specific number. No other number is smaller than n + 1/2 but close enough to n + 1/2 so that adding x + 1/2 gives n + 1 and not something smaller.
    – gnasher729
    Jun 10, 2020 at 4:45
  • 1
    @gnasher I disagree. Rounding is domain-dependent for this reason. You do not round numbers the same way for scientific applications and financial applications for this very reason. For example: using anything else than floor(x + .5f) for graphics or DSP will inevitably lead to disaster. That's probably also why round() is never used in scientific apps. Jun 11, 2020 at 13:08
240

This appears to be a known bug (Java bug 6430675: Math.round has surprising behavior for 0x1.fffffffffffffp-2) which has been fixed in Java 7.

2
87

Source code in JDK 6:

public static long round(double a) {
    return (long)Math.floor(a + 0.5d);
}

Source code in JDK 7:

public static long round(double a) {
    if (a != 0x1.fffffffffffffp-2) {
        // a is not the greatest double value less than 0.5
        return (long)Math.floor(a + 0.5d);
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
}

When the value is 0.49999999999999994d, in JDK 6, it will call floor and hence returns 1, but in JDK 7, the if condition is checking whether the number is the greatest double value less than 0.5 or not. As in this case the number is not the greatest double value less than 0.5, so the else block returns 0.

You can try 0.49999999999999999d, which will return 1, but not 0, because this is the greatest double value less than 0.5.

2
  • what happens with 1.499999999999999994 here then? returns 2 ? it should return 1, but this should get you the same error as earlier, but with a 1. ?
    – mjs
    Mar 28, 2012 at 13:53
  • 7
    1.499999999999999994 cannot be represented in double-precision floating-point. 1.4999999999999998 is the smallest double less than 1.5. As you can see from the question, the floor method rounds it correctly.
    – OrangeDog
    Mar 29, 2012 at 11:12
28

I've got the same on JDK 1.6 32-bit, but on Java 7 64-bit I've got 0 for 0.49999999999999994 which rounded is 0 and the last line is not printed. It seems to be a VM issue, however, using floating points, you should expect the results to differ a bit on various environments (CPU, 32- or 64-bit mode).

And, when using round or inverting matrices, etc., these bits can make a huge difference.

x64 output:

10.5 rounded is 11
10.499999999999998 rounded is 10
9.5 rounded is 10
9.499999999999998 rounded is 9
8.5 rounded is 9
8.499999999999998 rounded is 8
7.5 rounded is 8
7.499999999999999 rounded is 7
6.5 rounded is 7
6.499999999999999 rounded is 6
5.5 rounded is 6
5.499999999999999 rounded is 5
4.5 rounded is 5
4.499999999999999 rounded is 4
3.5 rounded is 4
3.4999999999999996 rounded is 3
2.5 rounded is 3
2.4999999999999996 rounded is 2
1.5 rounded is 2
1.4999999999999998 rounded is 1
0.5 rounded is 1
0.49999999999999994 rounded is 0
3
  • In Java 7 (the version you are using to test it) the bug is fixed. Oct 2, 2014 at 13:31
  • 1
    I think you meant 32 bit. I doubt en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZEBRA_%28computer%29 could run Java and I doubt there has been a 33 bit machine since.
    – chx
    Feb 19, 2015 at 13:02
  • @chx quite obviously, because I've written 32 bit before :) Feb 19, 2015 at 13:06
14

The answer hereafter is an excerpt of an Oracle bug report 6430675 at. Visit the report for the full explanation.

The methods {Math, StrictMath.round are operationally defined as

(long)Math.floor(a + 0.5d)

for double arguments. While this definition usually works as expected, it gives the surprising result of 1, rather than 0, for 0x1.fffffffffffffp-2 (0.49999999999999994).

The value 0.49999999999999994 is the greatest floating-point value less than 0.5. As a hexadecimal floating-point literal its value is 0x1.fffffffffffffp-2, which is equal to (2 - 2^52) * 2^-2. == (0.5 - 2^54). Therefore, the exact value of the sum

(0.5 - 2^54) + 0.5

is 1 - 2^54. This is halfway between the two adjacent floating-point numbers (1 - 2^53) and 1. In the IEEE 754 arithmetic round to nearest even rounding mode used by Java, when a floating-point results is inexact, the closer of the two representable floating-point values which bracket the exact result must be returned; if both values are equally close, the one which its last bit zero is returned. In this case the correct return value from the add is 1, not the greatest value less than 1.

While the method is operating as defined, the behavior on this input is very surprising; the specification could be amended to something more like "Round to the closest long, rounding ties up," which would allow the behavior on this input to be changed.

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