Is there a possibility to convert enumerator names to string in C?

up vote 133 down vote accepted

One way, making the preprocessor do the work. It also ensures your enums and strings are in sync.

#define FOREACH_FRUIT(FRUIT) \
        FRUIT(apple)   \
        FRUIT(orange)  \
        FRUIT(grape)   \
        FRUIT(banana)  \

#define GENERATE_ENUM(ENUM) ENUM,
#define GENERATE_STRING(STRING) #STRING,

enum FRUIT_ENUM {
    FOREACH_FRUIT(GENERATE_ENUM)
};

static const char *FRUIT_STRING[] = {
    FOREACH_FRUIT(GENERATE_STRING)
};

After the preprocessor gets done, you'll have:

enum FRUIT_ENUM {
    apple, orange, grape, banana,
};

static const char *FRUIT_STRING[] = {
    "apple", "orange", "grape", "banana",
};

Then you could do something like:

printf("enum apple as a string: %s\n",FRUIT_STRING[apple]);

If the use case is literally just printing the enum name, add the following macros:

#define str(x) #x
#define xstr(x) str(x)

Then do:

printf("enum apple as a string: %s\n", xstr(apple));

In this case, it may seem like the two-level macro is superfluous, however, due to how stringification works in C, it is necessary in some cases. For example, let's say we want to use a #define with an enum:

#define foo apple

int main() {
    printf("%s\n", str(foo));
    printf("%s\n", xstr(foo));
}

The output would be:

foo
apple

This is because str will stringify the input foo rather than expand it to be apple. By using xstr the macro expansion is done first, then that result is stringified.

See Stringification for more information.

  • This is perfect, but I am unable to understand what's really happening. :O – p0lAris Apr 16 '15 at 23:02
  • Also how does one convert a string to an enum in the above case? – p0lAris Apr 16 '15 at 23:09
  • There are a few ways it could be done, depending on what you are trying to achieve? – Terrence M Apr 29 '15 at 14:22
  • Very simple as you described. I just want enum to string and string to enum for an enum type in a header file. I don't want to create an implementation file (for C++/Objective-C) when dealing with enums. – p0lAris Apr 29 '15 at 14:53
  • 1
    If you do not want to pollute the namespace with apple and orange... you can prefix it with #define GENERATE_ENUM(ENUM) PREFIX##ENUM, – jsaak Jul 5 '16 at 18:26

In a situation where you have this:

enum fruit {
    apple, 
    orange, 
    grape,
    banana,
    // etc.
};

I like to put this in the header file where the enum is defined:

static inline char *stringFromFruit(enum fruit f)
{
    static const char *strings[] = { "apple", "orange", "grape", "banana", /* continue for rest of values */ };

    return strings[f];
}
  • 3
    For the life of me I can't see how this helps. Could you expand a little to make it more obvious. – David Heffernan Mar 28 '12 at 12:22
  • 2
    OK, how does that help? Are you saying it is easier to type enumToString(apple) than to type "apple"? It's not like there is any type-safety anywhere. Unless I am missing something what you suggest here is pointless and just succeeds in obfuscating code. – David Heffernan Mar 28 '12 at 12:32
  • 2
    OK, I see now. The macro is bogus in my view and I suggest you delete it. – David Heffernan Mar 28 '12 at 12:41
  • 2
    comments talk about macro. Where is it? – mk.. Apr 4 '14 at 7:01
  • 2
    This is also inconvenient to maintain. If I insert a new enum I have to rememeber to duplicate that also in the array, in the correct position. – Fabio Jun 22 '17 at 7:01

There is no simple way to achieves this directly. But P99 has macros that allow you to create such type of function automatically:

 P99_DECLARE_ENUM(color, red, green, blue);

in a header file, and

 P99_DEFINE_ENUM(color);

in one compilation unit (.c file) should then do the trick, in that example the function then would be called color_getname.

  • How do I pull this lib in? – JohnyTex Mar 22 at 14:14

I found a C preprocessor trick that is doing the same job without declaring a dedicated array string (Source: http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/~ram/pub/pub_jf47ht81Ht/c_preprocessor_applications_en).

Sequential enums

Following the invention of Stefan Ram, sequential enums (without explicitely stating the index, e.g. enum {foo=-1, foo1 = 1}) can be realized like this genius trick:

#include <stdio.h>

#define NAMES C(RED)C(GREEN)C(BLUE)
#define C(x) x,
enum color { NAMES TOP };
#undef C

#define C(x) #x,    
const char * const color_name[] = { NAMES };

This gives the following result:

int main( void )  { 
    printf( "The color is %s.\n", color_name[ RED ]);  
    printf( "There are %d colors.\n", TOP ); 
}

The color is RED.
There are 3 colors.

Non-Sequential enums

Since I wanted to map error codes definitions to are array string, so that I can append the raw error definition to the error code (e.g. "The error is 3 (LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED)."), I extended the code in that way that you can easily determine the required index for the respective enum values:

#define LOOPN(n,a) LOOP##n(a)
#define LOOPF ,
#define LOOP2(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF
#define LOOP3(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF
#define LOOP4(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF
#define LOOP5(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF
#define LOOP6(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF
#define LOOP7(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF
#define LOOP8(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF
#define LOOP9(a) a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF a LOOPF


#define LC_ERRORS_NAMES \
    Cn(LC_RESPONSE_PLUGIN_OK, -10) \
    Cw(8) \
    Cn(LC_RESPONSE_GENERIC_ERROR, -1) \
    Cn(LC_FT_OK, 0) \
    Ci(LC_FT_INVALID_HANDLE) \
    Ci(LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_FOUND) \
    Ci(LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED) \
    Ci(LC_FT_IO_ERROR) \
    Ci(LC_FT_INSUFFICIENT_RESOURCES) \
    Ci(LC_FT_INVALID_PARAMETER) \
    Ci(LC_FT_INVALID_BAUD_RATE) \
    Ci(LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED_FOR_ERASE) \
    Ci(LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED_FOR_WRITE) \
    Ci(LC_FT_FAILED_TO_WRITE_DEVICE) \
    Ci(LC_FT_EEPROM_READ_FAILED) \
    Ci(LC_FT_EEPROM_WRITE_FAILED) \
    Ci(LC_FT_EEPROM_ERASE_FAILED) \
    Ci(LC_FT_EEPROM_NOT_PRESENT) \
    Ci(LC_FT_EEPROM_NOT_PROGRAMMED) \
    Ci(LC_FT_INVALID_ARGS) \
    Ci(LC_FT_NOT_SUPPORTED) \
    Ci(LC_FT_OTHER_ERROR) \
    Ci(LC_FT_DEVICE_LIST_NOT_READY)


#define Cn(x,y) x=y,
#define Ci(x) x,
#define Cw(x)
enum LC_errors { LC_ERRORS_NAMES TOP };
#undef Cn
#undef Ci
#undef Cw
#define Cn(x,y) #x,
#define Ci(x) #x,
#define Cw(x) LOOPN(x,"")
static const char* __LC_errors__strings[] = { LC_ERRORS_NAMES };
static const char** LC_errors__strings = &__LC_errors__strings[10];

In this example, the C preprocessor will generate the following code:

enum LC_errors { LC_RESPONSE_PLUGIN_OK=-10,  LC_RESPONSE_GENERIC_ERROR=-1, LC_FT_OK=0, LC_FT_INVALID_HANDLE, LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_FOUND, LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED, LC_FT_IO_ERROR, LC_FT_INSUFFICIENT_RESOURCES, LC_FT_INVALID_PARAMETER, LC_FT_INVALID_BAUD_RATE, LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED_FOR_ERASE, LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED_FOR_WRITE, LC_FT_FAILED_TO_WRITE_DEVICE, LC_FT_EEPROM_READ_FAILED, LC_FT_EEPROM_WRITE_FAILED, LC_FT_EEPROM_ERASE_FAILED, LC_FT_EEPROM_NOT_PRESENT, LC_FT_EEPROM_NOT_PROGRAMMED, LC_FT_INVALID_ARGS, LC_FT_NOT_SUPPORTED, LC_FT_OTHER_ERROR, LC_FT_DEVICE_LIST_NOT_READY, TOP };

static const char* __LC_errors__strings[] = { "LC_RESPONSE_PLUGIN_OK", "" , "" , "" , "" , "" , "" , "" , "" "LC_RESPONSE_GENERIC_ERROR", "LC_FT_OK", "LC_FT_INVALID_HANDLE", "LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_FOUND", "LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED", "LC_FT_IO_ERROR", "LC_FT_INSUFFICIENT_RESOURCES", "LC_FT_INVALID_PARAMETER", "LC_FT_INVALID_BAUD_RATE", "LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED_FOR_ERASE", "LC_FT_DEVICE_NOT_OPENED_FOR_WRITE", "LC_FT_FAILED_TO_WRITE_DEVICE", "LC_FT_EEPROM_READ_FAILED", "LC_FT_EEPROM_WRITE_FAILED", "LC_FT_EEPROM_ERASE_FAILED", "LC_FT_EEPROM_NOT_PRESENT", "LC_FT_EEPROM_NOT_PROGRAMMED", "LC_FT_INVALID_ARGS", "LC_FT_NOT_SUPPORTED", "LC_FT_OTHER_ERROR", "LC_FT_DEVICE_LIST_NOT_READY", };

This results to the following implementation capabilities:

LC_errors__strings[-1] ==> LC_errors__strings[LC_RESPONSE_GENERIC_ERROR] ==> "LC_RESPONSE_GENERIC_ERROR"

A function like that without validating the enum is a trifle dangerous. I suggest using a switch statement. Another advantage is that this can be used for enums that have defined values, for example for flags where the values are 1,2,4,8,16 etc.

Also put all your enum strings together in one array:-

static const char * allEnums[] = {
    "Undefined",
    "apple",
    "orange"
    /* etc */
};

define the indices in a header file:-

#define ID_undefined       0
#define ID_fruit_apple     1
#define ID_fruit_orange    2
/* etc */

Doing this makes it easier to produce different versions, for example if you want to make international versions of your program with other languages.

Using a macro, also in the header file:-

#define CASE(type,val) case val: index = ID_##type##_##val; break;

Make a function with a switch statement, this should return a const char * because the strings static consts:-

const char * FruitString(enum fruit e){

    unsigned int index;

    switch(e){
        CASE(fruit, apple)
        CASE(fruit, orange)
        CASE(fruit, banana)
        /* etc */
        default: index = ID_undefined;
    }
    return allEnums[index];
}

If programming with Windows then the ID_ values can be resource values.

(If using C++ then all the functions can have the same name.

string EnumToString(fruit e);

)

An simpler alternative to Hokyo's "Non-Sequential enums" answer, based on using designators to instantiate the string array:

#define NAMES C(RED, 10)C(GREEN, 20)C(BLUE, 30)
#define C(k, v) k = v,
enum color { NAMES };
#undef C

#define C(k, v) [v] = #k,    
const char * const color_name[] = { NAMES };

I usually do this:

#define COLOR_STR(color)                            \
    (RED       == color ? "red"    :                \
     (BLUE     == color ? "blue"   :                \
      (GREEN   == color ? "green"  :                \
       (YELLOW == color ? "yellow" : "unknown"))))   

protected by eyllanesc Jul 19 at 12:59

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