46

This is my code so far:

var n = 123456789;
var d = n.toString().length;
var digits = [];
var squaredDigits = [];
for (i = d; i >= 1; i--) {
    var j = k / 10;
    var r = (n % k / j) - 0.5;
    var k = Math.pow(10, i);
    var result = r.toFixed(); 
    digits.push(result);
}

console.log(digits);

But when I run my code I get this: [9, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

If anyone can see the problem or find a better solution I would very much appreciate it!

18 Answers 18

72

Why not just do this?

var n =  123456789;
var digits = (""+n).split("");
  • 27
    Just a note, this will give an array of strings.. not numbers. – rgthree Mar 28 '12 at 19:24
  • Good point. But by the look of it the digit will then be multiplied by themselves, which I believe works fine. All that has to be done is be careful, and probably use parseInt(...,10); at appropriate times. – Niet the Dark Absol Mar 28 '12 at 19:28
  • the problem is I want to square the digits after, and i believe I cant do that with a string? – magnusbl Mar 29 '12 at 7:37
  • 2
    for (var i = 0; i < digits.length; i++) { digits[i] = +digits[i]; } will convert each value to an integer too – Martin May 1 '14 at 15:50
  • 5
    (""+num1).split('').map(Number) to return array of numbers instead of string. – Juni Brosas Jan 4 '18 at 2:40
46
(123456789).toString(10).split("")

^^ this will return an array of strings

(123456789).toString(10).split("").map(function(t){return parseInt(t)})

^^ this will return an array of ints

  • 1
    This will also give an array of strings.. not numbers – rgthree Mar 28 '12 at 19:25
  • Nice! Just make note that .map isn't available in IE 8 or below. – rgthree Mar 28 '12 at 19:31
  • One would expect map(parseInt) to work but Array.map calls the function also with the index and the array itself (was it really necessary?) so it won't work. – tokland Dec 17 '12 at 17:03
  • Beware! There’s well known pitfall. Yet another do-not-read-documentation-but-yell-at-stupid-javascript case. – Bogdan Slovyagin Oct 29 '16 at 11:06
34

What about:

const n = 123456;
Array.from(n.toString()).map(Number);
// [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
  • 8
    Nice solution, clear and easy to understand, and makes use of ES6 features. Also one of the recommended features here – tw_hoff Jun 2 '17 at 5:39
  • 3
    .map(Number) is very nice! – Lonely Dec 28 '17 at 21:40
  • By far the best answer – Luiz Henrique Guerra Aug 3 at 1:27
  • love this solution -- it forces me to do some discovery on global objects and their functionality – rpivovar Sep 6 at 4:29
26

I realize this was asked several months ago, but I have an addition to samccone's answer which is more succinct but I don't have the rep to add as a comment!

Instead of:

(123456789).toString(10).split("").map(function(t){return parseInt(t)})

Consider:

(123456789).toString(10).split("").map(Number)
  • 5
    What exactly does the 10 do in .toString(10) ? I know it references radix 10, but I've tested it with and without and can't find a discernible difference. Thanks! Also, cool edit. – EFH Mar 29 '16 at 0:15
  • @EFH If the radix is not specified, the preferred radix is assumed to be 10. Ref(developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…) – jtlindsey Jun 30 '16 at 2:01
  • 1
    Just wanted to drop a "amazing solution" here. – Ted Nov 23 '16 at 10:09
  • .toString(10) specifies base 10 numbers. Another example would be .toString(2) which specifies binary numbers. Test those two out. – noobninja May 7 '18 at 1:33
  • See also @nicolás-fantone 's ES6-based solution below. Array.from(n.toString()).map(Number); – noobninja May 7 '18 at 1:47
7

Modified the above answer a little bit. We don't really have to call the 'map' method explicitly, because it is already built-in into the 'Array.from' as a second argument. As of MDN.

Array.from(arrayLike[, mapFn[, thisArg]])

let num = 1234;
let arr = Array.from(String(num), Number);
console.log(arr); // [1, 2, 3, 4]
  • I like it, though it's probably appropriate to use const whenever you aren't going to reassign a variable – CertainPerformance Aug 5 '18 at 0:05
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer – ᆼᆺᆼ May 11 at 0:30
3

const toIntArray = (n) => ([...n + ""].map(v => +v))

1

Here's an alternative to Nicolás Fantone's answer. You could argue it's maybe a little less readable. The emphasis is that Array.from() can take an optional map function as a parameter. There are some performance gains this way since no intermediate array gets created.

const n = 123456;
Array.from(n.toString(), (val) => Number(val)); // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
  • this style will be come more human-readable as more coders become more familiar with fat arrows. – noobninja May 7 '18 at 2:08
0

Move:

var k = Math.pow(10, i);

above

var j = k / 10;
0
var num = 123456789;
num = num.toString(); //'123456789'
var digits = num.split(""); //[ '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' ]
  • 1
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Donald Duck May 23 '17 at 11:09
0

It's been a 5+ years for this question but heay always welcome to the efficient ways of coding/scripting.

var n = 123456789;
var arrayN = (`${n}`).split("").map(e => parseInt(e))
0

Another method here. Since number in Javascript is not splittable by default, you need to convert the number into a string first.

var n = 123;
n.toString().split('').map(Number);
0

I ended up solving it as follows:

const n = 123456789;
let toIntArray = (n) => ([...n + ""].map(Number));
console.log(toIntArray(n));

0

It's very simple, first convert the number to string using the toString() method in JavaScript and then use split() method to convert the string to an array of individual characters.

For example, the number is num, then

const numberDigits = num.toString().split('');
0

This will work for a number greater than 0. You don't need to convert the number into string:

function convertNumberToDigitArray(number) {
    const arr = [];
    while (number > 0) {
        let lastDigit = number % 10;
        arr.push(lastDigit);
        number = Math.floor(number / 10);
    }
    return arr;
}
0
const number = 1435;
number.toString().split('').map(el=>parseInt(el));
0
let input = 12345664
const output = []
while (input !== 0) {
  const roundedInput = Math.floor(input / 10)
  output.push(input - roundedInput * 10)
  input = roundedInput
}
console.log(output)
0

It is pretty short using Array destructuring and String templates:

const n = 12345678;
const digits = [...`${n}`];
console.log(digits);

-1

const toIntArray = (n) => ([...n + ""].map(v => +v))

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.