0

This holds true in IE, FireFox, and Chrome on dev box- including after manually deleting cookies in IE Internet Options I sign in as a user, change password (works) and sign out. I can then log in as the user with both the old and new password - a garbage password does fail authentication. Log IN - Change Password - Sign Out - Log In with old password again, Authenticates - Sign Out - Log In with New password, Authenticates - Sign Out - Log In with junk password fails of course Rinse and Repeat - same behavior Is there a code piece missing for the Azure part? Disconcerting - grrr web.config:

<authentication mode="Forms">
    <forms loginUrl="~/Account/LogOn" timeout="15"></forms>
</authentication>

SignOff code:

public ActionResult LogOff()
    {
        FormsAuthentication.SignOut();

        // Drop all the information held in the session
        Session.Clear();
        Session.Abandon();

        // clear authentication cookie
        HttpCookie cookie1 = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, "");
        cookie1.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1);
        Response.Cookies.Add(cookie1);

        // clear session cookie
        HttpCookie cookie2 = new HttpCookie("ASP.NET_SessionId", "");
        cookie2.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1);
        Response.Cookies.Add(cookie2);
        foreach (var cookie in Request.Cookies.AllKeys)
        {
            Request.Cookies.Remove(cookie);
        }
        // Redirect the user to the login page
        return RedirectToAction("LogOn"); 
    }
6
  • How are you storing the authentication information? Is it possible that you're saving multiple passwords for the same user? Mar 30 '12 at 2:56
  • Stored in a SQL table - No - I am not storing multiple passwords for the same user. Also, if I pick a user that I have not used in that browser I can not repeat the behavior. (Change in IE, then open Firefox, only the new one works). Mar 30 '12 at 3:02
  • You might want to try not Remove()ing all the cookies. That may be causing the server to not return them with the expiration date on them. Mar 30 '12 at 3:29
  • Nope - that doesn't work eihter. That was actually an add on after the other didn't work. I also tried this, that doesn't work, because when stepping through, it is the cookie showing in the remove section. (I can't get this to save my code block formatting now)<br/> HttpCookie cookie3 = new HttpCookie(".ASPXAUTH", ""); cookie3.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1); Response.Cookies.Add(cookie3); Mar 30 '12 at 12:34
  • Nope - that doesn't work eihter. That was actually an add on after the other didn't work. I also tried this, that doesn't work, because when stepping through, it is the cookie showing in the remove section. HttpCookie cookie3 = new HttpCookie(".ASPXAUTH", ""); cookie3.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1); Response.Cookies.Add(cookie3); Thank you for trying, though. Mar 30 '12 at 12:41
0

I didn't see the answer spot! Resolved! Appears EF was caching previously received entities scatteredcode.wordpress.com/tag/dependency-injection/ Force a new membership provider instance to be created for that web request, and thus guarantee that the database context will not be holding a stale user entity. Thank you Scattered Code –

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.