I’d like to see integers, positive or negative, in binary.

Rather like this question, but for JavaScript.

up vote 15 down vote accepted

This answer attempts to address integers with absolute values between Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER (or 2**53-1) and 2**31. The current solutions only address signed integers within 32 bits, but this solution will output in 64-bit two's complement form using float64ToInt64Binary():

// IIFE to scope internal variables
var float64ToInt64Binary = (function () {
  // create union
  var flt64 = new Float64Array(1)
  var uint16 = new Uint16Array(flt64.buffer)
  // 2**53-1
  var MAX_SAFE = 9007199254740991
  // 2**31
  var MAX_INT32 = 2147483648

  function uint16ToBinary() {
    var bin64 = ''

    // generate padded binary string a word at a time
    for (var word = 0; word < 4; word++) {
      bin64 = uint16[word].toString(2).padStart(16, 0) + bin64
    }

    return bin64
  }

  return function float64ToInt64Binary(number) {
    // NaN would pass through Math.abs(number) > MAX_SAFE
    if (!(Math.abs(number) <= MAX_SAFE)) {
      throw new RangeError('Absolute value must be less than 2**53')
    }

    var sign = number < 0 ? 1 : 0

    // shortcut using other answer for sufficiently small range
    if (Math.abs(number) <= MAX_INT32) {
      return (number >>> 0).toString(2).padStart(64, sign)
    }

    // little endian byte ordering
    flt64[0] = number

    // subtract bias from exponent bits
    var exponent = ((uint16[3] & 0x7FF0) >> 4) - 1022

    // encode implicit leading bit of mantissa
    uint16[3] |= 0x10
    // clear exponent and sign bit
    uint16[3] &= 0x1F

    // check sign bit
    if (sign === 1) {
      // apply two's complement
      uint16[0] ^= 0xFFFF
      uint16[1] ^= 0xFFFF
      uint16[2] ^= 0xFFFF
      uint16[3] ^= 0xFFFF
      // propagate carry bit
      for (var word = 0; word < 3 && uint16[word] === 0xFFFF; word++) {
        // apply integer overflow
        uint16[word] = 0
      }

      // complete increment
      uint16[word]++
    }

    // only keep integer part of mantissa
    var bin64 = uint16ToBinary().substr(11, Math.max(exponent, 0))
    // sign-extend binary string
    return bin64.padStart(64, sign)
  }
})()

console.log('8')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(8))
console.log('-8')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(-8))
console.log('2**33-1')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(2**33-1))
console.log('-(2**33-1)')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(-(2**33-1)))
console.log('2**53-1')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(2**53-1))
console.log('-(2**53-1)')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(-(2**53-1)))
console.log('2**52')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(2**52))
console.log('-(2**52)')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(-(2**52)))
console.log('2**52+1')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(2**52+1))
console.log('-(2**52+1)')
console.log(float64ToInt64Binary(-(2**52+1)))
.as-console-wrapper {
  max-height: 100% !important;
}

This answer heavily deals with the IEEE-754 Double-precision floating-point format, illustrated here:

IEEE-754 Double-precision floating-point format

   seee eeee eeee ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff ffff
   ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
   [    uint16[3]    ] [    uint16[2]    ] [    uint16[1]    ] [    uint16[0]    ]
   [                                   flt64[0]                                  ]

   little endian byte ordering

   s = sign = uint16[3] >> 15
   e = exponent = (uint16[3] & 0x7FF) >> 4
   f = fraction

The way the solution works is it creates a union between a 64-bit floating point number and an unsigned 16-bit integer array in little endian byte ordering. After validating the integer input range, it casts the input to a double precision floating point number on the buffer, and then uses the union to gain bit access to the value and calculate the binary string based on the unbiased binary exponent and fraction bits.

The solution is implemented in pure ECMAScript 5 except for the use of String#padStart(), which has an available polyfill here.

  • 2
    Much larger range? It works for -(2**53)-1 to 2**53-1 instead of just -(2**31) to 2**31-1 like annan's answer. – Patrick Roberts Jul 24 '17 at 22:01
  • 1
    @barlop Other advantages? No, not over any of the other answers here. It just takes the unique approach of using TypedArrays as a union in order to do bit manipulation without having to coerce the number to 32 bits. – Patrick Roberts Jul 25 '17 at 14:45
  • 1
    @barlop I'd say your three lines offer little to no advantage. The second toString() is completely unnecessary, and prepending a single 0 seems to do more harm than good. The only "advantage" I can think of is that it clarifies values between 2**31 and 2**32-1 as positive by prepending a 0 (making their bitstrings different from the values between -(2**32) and -(2**31)), but makes the bitstring 33 bytes instead of 32 in those cases, which may cause issues if consumers of the code assume the max possible length is 32. – Patrick Roberts Jul 25 '17 at 14:54
  • 1
    don't you use to put SEMICOLONS at the end? – user3840019 Jun 18 at 17:05
  • 1
    from 2**32+1 on, last (rightmost) bit is cleared when it should be set. – Orwol Chiles Nov 10 at 17:25

Answer:

function dec2bin(dec){
    return (dec >>> 0).toString(2);
}

dec2bin(1);    // 1
dec2bin(-1);   // 11111111111111111111111111111111
dec2bin(256);  // 100000000
dec2bin(-256); // 11111111111111111111111100000000

You can use Number.toString(2) function, but it has some problems when representing negative numbers. For example, (-1).toString(2) output is "-1".

To fix this issue, you can use the unsigned right shift bitwise operator (>>>) to coerce your number to an unsigned integer.

If you run (-1 >>> 0).toString(2) you will shift your number 0 bits to the right, which doesn't change the number itself but it will be represented as an unsigned integer. The code above will output "11111111111111111111111111111111" correctly.

This question has further explanation.

-3 >>> 0 (right logical shift) coerces its arguments to unsigned integers, which is why you get the 32-bit two's complement representation of -3.


Note 1: this answer expects a Number as argument, so convert it accordingly.

Note 2: the result is the a string without leading zeros, so apply padding as you need.

  • 5
    Here is the explanation – fernandosavio Jul 26 '13 at 14:44
  • been a while since I tried javascript but trying it here w3schools.com/js/tryit.asp?filename=tryjs_output_alert with this <script> window.alert((-3 >>> 0).toString(2)); </script> yeah it worked – barlop Apr 10 '15 at 10:35
  • toString(2) doesn't work because you are getting the input from text. Use this: function decToBase(dec, base){ return parseInt(dec).toString(base); } alert(decToBase(dec, 2)); – Magus May 29 '15 at 13:47
  • You are assuming that the input is text, but the function in the answer expect a integer... So, if input is a text just convert it to integer, use the fake bitshift and it's done – fernandosavio May 30 '15 at 18:30
  • @Magus who is getting the input from text?! – barlop Jun 2 '15 at 9:58

Try

num.toString(2);

The 2 is the radix and can be any base between 2 and 36

source here

UPDATE:

This will only work for positive numbers, Javascript represents negative binary integers in two's-complement notation. I made this little function which should do the trick, I haven't tested it out properly:

function dec2Bin(dec)
{
    if(dec >= 0) {
        return dec.toString(2);
    }
    else {
        /* Here you could represent the number in 2s compliment but this is not what 
           JS uses as its not sure how many bits are in your number range. There are 
           some suggestions https://stackoverflow.com/questions/10936600/javascript-decimal-to-binary-64-bit 
        */
        return (~dec).toString(2);
    }
}

I had some help from here

  • doesn't work for -1. a=-1; document.write(Number(a.toString(2))); displays -1 – barlop Mar 30 '12 at 9:05
  • The update still doesn't appear to work for negative numbers (-3 returns 1). Also I believe dec > 0 should be dec >= 0, which should at least fix 0. Because dec2Bin(0) returns 10. – Adam Merrifield Apr 15 '14 at 21:17
  • Both cases in above comments return correct result in my chrome console - var a = -1; a.toString(2); "-1" var a = -3; a.toString(2); "-11" – Anmol Saraf Jul 9 '14 at 12:01
  • @AnmolSaraf I see what you mean, and while colloquially when people say what is -5 in decimal, and the answer is -5 When it comes to negative numbers in binary , in a sense yeah you could stick a minus sign there so 5 is 101 and -5 is -101 but since computers don't store minus signs, they just represent 1s and 0s, so when we say negative numbers in binary, we really mean putting the negative number (minus sign included) in 1s and 0s. Some ways include 1s complement, 2s complement, and 'sign and magnitude'. So -101010101 or -0101010 is not what people mean by a negative number in binary. – barlop Apr 10 '15 at 10:59
  • This link may be of interest to some stackoverflow.com/questions/12337360/… anyhow, Your answer contradicts itself, you write "Javascript represents negative binary integers in two's-complement notation." And your code says " Here you could represent the number in 2s compliment but this is not what JS as uses as [nonsense reason] " And you give no reference either. – barlop Feb 22 '16 at 12:05

The binary in 'convert to binary' can refer to three main things. The positional number system, the binary representation in memory or 32bit bitstrings. (for 64bit bitstrings see Patrick Roberts' answer)

1. Number System

(123456).toString(2) will convert numbers to the base 2 positional numeral system. In this system negative numbers are written with minus signs just like in decimal.

2. Internal Representation

The internal representation of numbers is 64 bit floating point and some limitations are discussed in this answer. There is no easy way to create a bit-string representation of this in javascript nor access specific bits.

3. Masks & Bitwise Operators

MDN has a good overview of how bitwise operators work. Importantly:

Bitwise operators treat their operands as a sequence of 32 bits (zeros and ones)

Before operations are applied the 64 bit floating points numbers are cast to 32 bit signed integers. After they are converted back.

Here is the MDN example code for converting numbers into 32-bit strings.

function createBinaryString (nMask) {
  // nMask must be between -2147483648 and 2147483647
  for (var nFlag = 0, nShifted = nMask, sMask = ""; nFlag < 32;
       nFlag++, sMask += String(nShifted >>> 31), nShifted <<= 1);
  return sMask;
}

createBinaryString(0) //-> "00000000000000000000000000000000"
createBinaryString(123) //-> "00000000000000000000000001111011"
createBinaryString(-1) //-> "11111111111111111111111111111111"
createBinaryString(-1123456) //-> "11111111111011101101101110000000"
createBinaryString(0x7fffffff) //-> "01111111111111111111111111111111"
  • What is the advantage of using this function instead of using a simple Number(num).toString(2) ? – Magus Jun 3 '15 at 23:50
  • 5
    @Magus I think I explain adequately the differences between numerals and binary strings. A 32 bit binary string is always thirty-two characters long comprised of "1"s and "0"s. toString returns an actual number represented using the positional number systems with the given base. It depends why you want the string, they have very different meanings. – Annan Jun 4 '15 at 3:07
  • sorry, you are right. I jumped straight to the code. – Magus Jun 4 '15 at 4:56
  • 1
    Had an issue with leading 0s using the other posted methods (specifically on this number 536870912, the two leading zeroes are removed), but this solution handled it correctly. – UberMouse Aug 5 '15 at 4:17
  • @UberMouse yeah the >>> has the leading 0s issue, i'll accept this one. – barlop Jul 24 '17 at 21:41

A simple way is just...

Number(42).toString(2);

// "101010"
  • 21
    I would prefer (42).toString(2) – Willem D'Haeseleer Apr 15 '14 at 16:57
  • 27
    Or even shorter 42..toString(2) – kapex Jul 26 '14 at 2:38
  • 8
    People are struggling with this. The answer is correct because it casts the input (42) to an integer and that line is needed. If you get your 'number' from an text input the toString(2) wouldn't work. – Magus Jun 3 '15 at 23:46
  • 1
    @barlop I give up. Here, have a cookie. – Magus Jun 7 '15 at 0:19
  • 4
    @Kapep, Dude that's genius. How did you know about that? – Pacerier Feb 17 '17 at 4:30

Note- the basic (x>>>0).toString(2); has a slight issue when x is positive. I have some example code at the end of my answer that corrects that problem with the >>> method while still using >>>.

(-3>>>0).toString(2);

prints -3 in 2s complement.

1111111111101

A working example

C:\>type n1.js
console.log(   (-3 >>> 0).toString(2)    );
C:\>
C:\>node n1.js
11111111111111111111111111111101

C:\>

This in the URL bar is another quick proof

javascript:alert((-3>>>0).toString(2))

Note- The result is very slightly flawed, in that it always starts with a 1, which for negative numbers is fine. For positive numbers you should prepend a 0 to the beginning so that the result is really 2s complement. So (8>>>0).toString(2) produces 1000 which isn't really 8 in 2s complement, but prepending that 0, making it 01000, is correct 8 in 2s complement. In proper 2s complement, any bit string starting with 0 is >=0, and any bit string starting with 1, is negative.

e.g. this gets round that problem

// or x=-5  whatever number you want to view in binary  
x=5;   
if(x>0) prepend="0"; else prepend=""; 
alert(prepend+((x>>>0)).toString(2));

The other solutions are the one from Annan(though Annan's explanations and definitions are full of errors, he has code that produces the right output), and the solution from Patrick.

Anybody that doesn't understand the fact of positive numbers starting with 0 and negative numbers with 1, in 2s complement, could check this SO QnA on 2s complement. What is “2's Complement”?

  • I posted my answer which is similar to fernando's answer, though fernando's answer didn't have such a clear example, didn't show output, and had a big distraction talking about parseInt which is irrelevant. My edit to his answer didn't seem to make it so i've posted my own though i'll leave his answer as accepted. – barlop Nov 17 '15 at 14:02
  • Annan and Patrick Robert's have posted solutions that have correct 2s complement. – barlop Jul 24 '17 at 22:10
  • @barlop also now i've added an improvement to the >>> solution.. which gives correct 2s complement with >>>. – barlop Jul 25 '17 at 0:34

You can write your own function that returns an array of bits. Example how to convert number to bits

Divisor| Dividend| bits/remainder

2 | 9 | 1

2 | 4 | 0

2 | 2 | 0

~ | 1 |~

example of above line: 2 * 4 = 8 and remainder is 1 so 9 = 1 0 0 1

function numToBit(num){
    var number = num
    var result = []
    while(number >= 1 ){
        result.unshift(Math.floor(number%2))
        number = number/2
    }
    return result
}

Read remainders from bottom to top. Digit 1 in the middle to top.

  • 1
    Btw, why do you Math.floor(number%2) instead of number = Math.floor(number/2)? – Pacerier Feb 17 '17 at 4:39
  • 1
    The reason is number%2 is not equal to number/2. We are interested in remainder not quotient. – supritshah1289 Feb 18 '17 at 18:58
  • Doesn't work for negative numbers – barlop Jul 24 '17 at 22:09

This is my code:

var x = prompt("enter number", "7");
var i = 0;
var binaryvar = " ";

function add(n) {
    if (n == 0) {
        binaryvar = "0" + binaryvar; 
    }
    else {
        binaryvar = "1" + binaryvar;
    }
}

function binary() {
    while (i < 1) {
        if (x == 1) {
            add(1);
            document.write(binaryvar);
            break;
        }
        else {
            if (x % 2 == 0) {
                x = x / 2;
                add(0);
            }
            else {
                x = (x - 1) / 2;
                add(1);
            }
        }
    }
}

binary();
  • 2
    That may be useful for studying computer science to see how to do it manually, so as to teach yourself, but that is not what I am asking! If you are going to reinvent the wheel doing it manually like that, then it should be at least with the advantage of increased efficiency or some advantage like increase in the size of the values it can cope with. I don't see any discussion from you stating any such advantage there. – barlop Nov 7 '17 at 15:41

This is the solution . Its quite simple as a matter of fact

function binaries(num1){ 
        var str = num1.toString(2)
        return(console.log('The binary form of ' + num1 + ' is: ' + str))
     }
     binaries(3

)

        /*
         According to MDN, Number.prototype.toString() overrides 
         Object.prototype.toString() with the useful distinction that you can 
         pass in a single integer argument. This argument is an optional radix, 
         numbers 2 to 36 allowed.So in the example above, we’re passing in 2 to 
         get a string representation of the binary for the base 10 number 100, 
         i.e. 1100100.
        */
  • That solution has already been proposed many times and, as commented by OP already on Mar 30 '12 at 9:01, does not work for negative numbers. – Adrian W Jun 12 at 8:25
  • @AdrianW I suggest downvoting this. I notice you haven't. What does it take for you to downvote an answer then?! – barlop Jun 12 at 23:34

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