3

If I have an FFT implementation of a certain size M (power of 2), how can I calculate the FFT of a set of size P=k*M, where k is a power of 2 as well?

#define M 256  
#define P 1024  
complex float x[P];  
complex float X[P];

// Use FFT_M(y) to calculate X = FFT_P(x) here

[The question is expressed in a general sense on purpose. I know FFT calculation is a huge field and many architecture specific optimizations were researched and developed, but what I am trying to understand is how is this doable in the more abstract level. Note that I am no FFT (or DFT, for that matter) expert, so if an explanation can be laid down in simple terms that would be appreciated]

4

Here's an algorithm for computing an FFT of size P using two smaller FFT functions, of sizes M and N (the original question call the sizes M and k).

Inputs:
P is the size of the large FFT you wish to compute.
M, N are selected such that MN=P.
x[0...P-1] is the input data.

Setup:
U is a 2D array with M rows and N columns.
y is a vector of length P, which will hold FFT of x.

Algorithm:
step 1. Fill U from x by columns, so that U looks like this:
x(0) x(M) ... x(P-M)
x(1) x(M+1) ... x(P-M+1)
x(2) x(M+2) ... x(P-M+2)
... ... ... ...
x(M-1) x(2M-1) ... x(P-1)

step 2. Replace each row of U with its own FFT (of length N).
step 3. Multiply each element of U(m,n) by exp(-2*pi*j*m*n/P).
step 4. Replace each column of U with its own FFT (of length M).
step 5. Read out the elements of U by rows into y, like this:

y(0) y(1) ... y(N-1)
y(N) y(N+1) ... y(2N-1)
y(2N) y(2N+1) ... y(3N-1)
... ... ... ...
y(P-N) y(P-N-1) ... y(P-1)

Here is MATLAB code which implements this algorithm. You can test it by typing fft_decomposition(randn(256,1), 8);

function y = fft_decomposition(x, M)
% y = fft_decomposition(x, M)
% Computes FFT by decomposing into smaller FFTs.
%
% Inputs:
% x is a 1D array of the input data.
% M is the size of one of the FFTs to use.
%
% Outputs:
% y is the FFT of x.  It has been computed using FFTs of size M and
% length(x)/M.
%
% Note that this implementation doesn't explicitly use the 2D array U; it
% works on samples of x in-place.

q = 1;   % Offset because MATLAB starts at one.  Set to 0 for C code.
x_original = x;
P = length(x);
if mod(P,M)~=0, error('Invalid block size.'); end;
N = P/M;

% step 2: FFT-N on rows of U.
for m = 0 : M-1
    x(q+(m:M:P-1)) = fft(x(q+(m:M:P-1)));
end;

% step 3: Twiddle factors.
for m = 0 : M-1
    for n = 0 : N-1
        x(m+n*M+q) = x(m+n*M+q) * exp(-2*pi*j*m*n/P);
    end;
end;

% step 4:  FFT-M on columns of U.
for n = 0 : N-1
    x(q+n*M+(0:M-1)) = fft(x(q+n*M+(0:M-1)));
end;

% step 5:  Re-arrange samples for output.
y = zeros(size(x));
for m = 0 : M-1
    for n = 0 : N-1
        y(m*N+n+q) = x(m+n*M+q);
    end;
end;

err = max(abs(y-fft(x_original)));
fprintf( 1, 'The largest error amplitude is %g\n', err);
return;
% End of fft_decomposition().
  • Does this algorithm have a name? Did you find it somewhere, or did you invent it yourself? Can you explain what it does? – GregRos Mar 28 '14 at 23:36
  • (Does this algorithm have a name?) No, not as far as I know. – kevin_o Mar 29 '14 at 2:50
  • 1
    (Did you find it somewhere, or did you invent it yourself?) I pieced it together from various internet sources and my own understanding. See [link]dsprelated.com/showmessage/75981/1.php, especially Tim Dillon's response. His answer covers it. – kevin_o Mar 29 '14 at 2:57
  • (Can you explain what it does?) If I view the algorithm as a black box, it computes the FFT of its input. If I were to describe how it does it, I would say that it decomposes a P-point FFT into repeated M and N-point FFTs, where P=MN (with some twiddling and reordering too). – kevin_o Mar 29 '14 at 2:58
  • In 1989, David H. Bailey called it the "Four Step FFT Algorithm", and he credits a 1966 paper by Gentleman and Sande. – kevin_o Feb 2 '18 at 20:06
0

You could just use the last log2(k) passes of a radix-2 FFT, assuming the previous FFT results are from appropriately interleaved data subsets.

  • Thanks. And what does this assumption mean? I assume your intention is that after performing the FFT_M() step I should reorganize the output of these transforms and then continue applying the passes as usual? – ysap Mar 30 '12 at 15:01
0

Well an FFT is basically a recursive type of Fourier Transform. It relies on the fact that as wikipedia puts it:

The best-known FFT algorithms depend upon the factorization of N, but there are FFTs with O(N log N) complexity for >all N, even for prime N. Many FFT algorithms only depend on the fact that e^(-2pi*i/N) is an N-th primitive root of unity, and >thus can be applied to analogous transforms over any finite field, such as number-theoretic transforms. Since the >inverse DFT is the same as the DFT, but with the opposite sign in the exponent and a 1/N factor, any FFT algorithm >can easily be adapted for it.

So this has pretty much already been done in the FFT. If you are talking about getting longer period signals out of your transform you are better off doing an DFT over the data sets of limited frequencies. There might be a way to do it from the frequency domain but IDK if anyone has actually done it. You could be the first!!!! :)

0

kevin_o's response worked quite well. I took his code and eliminated the loops using some basic Matlab tricks. It functionally is identical to his version

function y = fft_decomposition(x, M)
% y = fft_decomposition(x, M)
% Computes FFT by decomposing into smaller FFTs.
%
% Inputs:
% x is a 1D array of the input data.
% M is the size of one of the FFTs to use.
%
% Outputs:
% y is the FFT of x.  It has been computed using FFTs of size M and
% length(x)/M.
%
% Note that this implementation doesn't explicitly use the 2D array U; it
% works on samples of x in-place.

q = 1;   % Offset because MATLAB starts at one.  Set to 0 for C code.
x_original = x;
P = length(x);
if mod(P,M)~=0, error('Invalid block size.'); end;
N = P/M;

% step 2: FFT-N on rows of U.
X=fft(reshape(x,M,N),[],2);

% step 3: Twiddle factors.
X=X.*exp(-j*2*pi*(0:M-1)'*(0:N-1)/P);

% step 4:  FFT-M on columns of U.
X=fft(X);

% step 5:  Re-arrange samples for output.
x_twiddle=bsxfun(@plus,M*(0:N-1)',(0:M-1))+q;
y=X(x_twiddle(:));

% err = max(abs(y-fft(x_original)));
% fprintf( 1, 'The largest error amplitude is %g\n', err);
return;
% End of fft_decomposition()

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