39

I'm new to LINQ. I need to compute new_id as follows:

public class C_Movement
{
  public int id=-1;
  public static ObservableCollection<C_Movement> list=new ObservableCollection<C_Movement>();
  // ...
}

int new_id = (C_Movement.list.Count==0) ? 0 : C_Movement.list.Max(x => x.id)+1;

Is there a LINQ way to compact that expression, so that I don't have to use the ? : structure? The problem is that, when C_Movement.list contains no elements, C_Movement.list.Max(x => x.id) returns null (and I would like it to return -1, instead).

Thank you.

2
  • 2
    How can it return null when it's returning an integer?
    – MikeP
    Commented Mar 30, 2012 at 17:49
  • 1
    For future reference, the "? :" structure is actually called the conditional operator (in MSDN docs), but most folks call it the ternary operator. :)
    – Mike Hofer
    Commented Mar 30, 2012 at 18:10

5 Answers 5

73

DefaultIfEmpty method should help:

int new_id = C_Movement.list.Select(x => x.id).DefaultIfEmpty(-1).Max()+1;
0
6

int new_id = C_Movement.list.Max(x => (int?)x.id).GetValueOrDefault(-1) + 1;

where GetValueOrDefault is a method of Nullable<T>.

1
  • 8
    It's worth noting that only Max() on collections of nullable types returns null for empty sequence while Max() in general throws exception.
    – sluki
    Commented Jul 21, 2014 at 16:12
2

How about:

int new_id = 0;

if (C_Movement.list.Any())
    new_id = C_Movement.list.Max(x => x.id) + 1;
3
  • 2
    you don't need an else here since you've already set it to 0
    – hunter
    Commented Mar 30, 2012 at 17:50
  • That's true, I guess I'm anal about certain things. Bad habits die hard! Commented Mar 30, 2012 at 17:51
  • 2
    The major problem with this version is that it will double enumerate the iterator. The "Any" will be the first iteration and the "Max" will be the second. This implementation should be avoided.
    – srm
    Commented Aug 14, 2014 at 14:06
1

To expand on @Snowbear's answer:

 public static TProperty MaxOrDefault<TSource, TProperty>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
                                                          Func<TSource, TProperty> selector,TProperty defaultValue=default)
 {
     var items=source.Select(selector).DefaultIfEmpty(defaultValue);
     return items.Max();
 }

But it eludes me why 12 years later .Net does not have this.

1
  • But it eludes me -- Probably because then there are far more LINQ methods that also could have this addition, while it's very easy to get the desired effect by adding DefaultIfEmpty on either of them. Also, each new method must be documented in hundreds of languages... Commented Dec 24, 2023 at 22:03
-1

Try this

    public static class LinqExtensions
    {
        public static TValue Max<TSource, TValue>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TValue> selector, TValue defaultValueIfEmpty)
            where TValue : IComparable
        {
            if (source == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(source));
            if (selector == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(selector));
            TValue sum;
            using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
            {
                if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
                    return defaultValueIfEmpty;
                sum = selector(enumerator.Current);
                while (enumerator.MoveNext())
                {
                    var num2 = selector(enumerator.Current);
                    if (num2.CompareTo(sum) > 0)
                        sum = num2;
                }
            }
            return sum;
        }

        public static TSource Max<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, TSource defaultValueIfEmpty)
            where TSource : IComparable
        {
            if (source == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(source));
            TSource sum;
            using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
            {
                if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
                    return defaultValueIfEmpty;
                sum = enumerator.Current;
                while (enumerator.MoveNext())
                {
                    var num2 = enumerator.Current;
                    if (num2.CompareTo(sum) > 0)
                        sum = num2;
                }
            }
            return sum;
        }

    }
6
  • The generic type constraint where TValue : IComparable defeats the purpose of defaultValueIfEmpty because a nullable type doesn't implement IComparable. Besides that, (1) it's always useful when posting code exceeding a couple of lines to add some explanation, and (2) "Try this" isn't really an answer. Commented May 3, 2019 at 8:55
  • I meant Nullable<T>. My first effort trying your code failed with int?. About an explanation. Code itself may be easy to understand, but the process leading to that specific solution is at least as interesting. Commented May 4, 2019 at 15:38
  • It's the exact same Microsoft source code of Max augmented to have a default value.
    – Softlion
    Commented May 4, 2019 at 16:37
  • github.com/Microsoft/referencesource/blob/master/System.Core/… Line 1879. It uses a Comparer<TSource>.Default which implements IComparer.
    – Softlion
    Commented May 4, 2019 at 16:50
  • That's not the same as a generic type constraint. Comparer<int?>.Default is an object comparing two int? instances. An int? itself is not IComparable, rendering your function useless for Nullable<T> types (and anything else that doesn't implement IComparable). Commented May 4, 2019 at 18:24

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