78

I have set up a global filter for all my controller actions in which I open and close NHibernate sessions. 95% of these action need some database access, but 5% don't. Is there any easy way to disable this global filter for those 5%. I could go the other way round and decorate only the actions that need the database, but that would be far more work.

2
  • 1
    What about creating another action and decorate the 5% with this. Something like NHibernateNotRequiredAttribute()?
    – dreza
    Mar 31 '12 at 20:22
  • weblogs.asp.net/imranbaloch/…
    – dovid
    Dec 12 '16 at 10:14
155

You could write a marker attribute:

public class SkipMyGlobalActionFilterAttribute : Attribute
{
}

and then in your global action filter test for the presence of this marker on the action:

public class MyGlobalActionFilter : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        if (filterContext.ActionDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(SkipMyGlobalActionFilterAttribute), false).Any())
        {
            return;
        }

        // here do whatever you were intending to do
    }
}

and then if you want to exclude some action from the global filter simply decorate it with the marker attribute:

[SkipMyGlobalActionFilter]
public ActionResult Index()
{
    return View();
}
8
  • Really great solution. I wonder how I didn't think of this by myself. Thanks.
    – zszep
    Apr 1 '12 at 16:09
  • 5
    This was helpful thanks. Just to help future people, you can also put the same thing on a Controller, and use filterContext.ActionDescriptor.ControllerDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes to apply to all actions.
    – Daryl Teo
    Jun 25 '16 at 7:38
  • 4
    anyone after api solution the syntax is slightly different: actionContext.ActionDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes<SkipMyGlobalActionFilter>().Any()
    – akd
    Jul 7 '17 at 11:16
  • And if you also want to skip specific controller attribute then you should add || in the condition filterContext.ControllerContext.ControllerDescriptor.GetCustomAttributes<SkipMyGlobalActionFilter>().Any()
    – akd
    Jul 7 '17 at 11:40
  • 3
    like Leniel wrote, in ASP.NET Core, filterContext.ActionDescriptor doens't have the GetCustomAttributes method. How to do it in ASP.NET core?
    – ashilon
    Sep 12 '17 at 5:59
13

Though, the accepted answer by Darin Dimitrov is fine and working well but, for me, the simplest and most efficient answer found here.

You just need to add a boolean property to your attribute and check against it, just before your logic begins:

public class DataAccessAttribute: ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public bool Disable { get; set; }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        if (Disable) return;

        // Your original logic for your 95% actions goes here.
    }
}

Then at your 5% actions just use it like this:

[DataAccessAttribute(Disable=true)]
public ActionResult Index()
{            
    return View();
}
1
  • 1
    One little "gotcha" I've noticed here - if you specify an Order in the global declaration of the filter, you must also specify the same order on on the attribute. Eg [DataAccessAttribute(Disable=true,Order=2)] and filters.Add(new DataAccessAttribute(), 2);
    – Jon Story
    Mar 23 '20 at 21:26
8

In AspNetCore, the accepted answer by @darin-dimitrov can be adapted to work as follows:

First, implement IFilterMetadata on the marker attribute:

public class SkipMyGlobalActionFilterAttribute : Attribute, IFilterMetadata
{
}

Then search the Filters property for this attribute on the ActionExecutingContext:

public class MyGlobalActionFilter : IActionFilter
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext context)
    {
        if (context.Filters.OfType<SkipMyGlobalActionFilterAttribute>().Any())
        {
            return;
        }

        // etc
    }
}
4

At least nowadays, this is quite easy: to exclude all action filters from an action, just add the OverrideActionFiltersAttribute.

There are similar attributes for other filters: OverrideAuthenticationAttribute, OverrideAuthorizationAttribute and OverrideExceptionAttribute.

See also https://www.strathweb.com/2013/06/overriding-filters-in-asp-net-web-api-vnext/

1
  • Nowadays being 2013+? Not sure why this isn't the accepted answer as it seems canonical. Jul 11 '19 at 2:12
2

Create a custom Filter Provider. Write a class which will implement IFilterProvider. This IFilterProvider interface has a method GetFilters which returns Filters which needs to be executed.

public class MyFilterProvider : IFilterProvider
{
        private readonly List<Func<ControllerContext, object>> filterconditions = new List<Func<ControllerContext, object>>();
        public void Add(Func<ControllerContext, object> mycondition)
        {
            filterconditions.Add(mycondition);
        }

        public IEnumerable<Filter> GetFilters(ControllerContext controllerContext, ActionDescriptor actionDescriptor)
        {
            return from filtercondition in filterconditions
                   select filtercondition(controllerContext) into ctrlContext
                   where ctrlContext!= null
                   select new Filter(ctrlContext, FilterScope.Global);
        }
}

=============================================================================
In Global.asax.cs

public static void RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilterCollection filters)
        {
            MyFilterProvider provider = new MyFilterProvider();
            provider.Add(d => d.RouteData.Values["action"].ToString() != "SkipFilterAction1 " ? new NHibernateActionFilter() : null);
            FilterProviders.Providers.Add(provider);
        }


protected void Application_Start()
{
    RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
}
2

Well, I think I got it working for ASP.NET Core.
Here's the code:

public override async Task OnActionExecutionAsync(ActionExecutingContext context, ActionExecutionDelegate next)
    {
        // Prepare the audit
        _parameters = context.ActionArguments;

        await next();

        if (IsExcluded(context))
        {
            return;
        }

        var routeData = context.RouteData;

        var controllerName = (string)routeData.Values["controller"];
        var actionName = (string)routeData.Values["action"];

        // Log action data
        var auditEntry = new AuditEntry
        {
            ActionName = actionName,
            EntityType = controllerName,
            EntityID = GetEntityId(),
            PerformedAt = DateTime.Now,
            PersonID = context.HttpContext.Session.GetCurrentUser()?.PersonId.ToString()
        };

        _auditHandler.DbContext.Audits.Add(auditEntry);
        await _auditHandler.DbContext.SaveChangesAsync();
    }

    private bool IsExcluded(ActionContext context)
    {
        var controllerActionDescriptor = (Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.Controllers.ControllerActionDescriptor)context.ActionDescriptor;

        return controllerActionDescriptor.ControllerTypeInfo.IsDefined(typeof(ExcludeFromAuditing), false) ||
               controllerActionDescriptor.MethodInfo.IsDefined(typeof(ExcludeFromAuditing), false);
    }

The relevant code is in the 'IsExcluded' method.

1

You can change your filter code like this:

 public class NHibernateActionFilter : ActionFilterAttribute
    {
        public IEnumerable<string> ActionsToSkip { get; set; }

        public NHibernateActionFilter(params string[] actionsToSkip)
        {
            ActionsToSkip = actionsToSkip;
        }

        public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
        {
            if (null != ActionsToSkip && ActionsToSkip.Any(a => 
String.Compare(a,  filterContext.ActionDescriptor.ActionName, true) == 0))
                {
                    return;
                }
           //here you code
        }
    }

And use it:

[NHibernateActionFilter(new[] { "SkipFilterAction1 ", "Action2"})]
2
  • 2
    That's one way to do it, but a little difficult to maintain over time.
    – zszep
    Apr 1 '12 at 16:11
  • 1
    If you change your action name and forget to change it in the attribute usage, the compiler won't warn you. This is very likely to cause maintenance pains. I prefer Darin's answer since you don't have to specify the actions manually.
    – Nashenas
    Oct 14 '14 at 17:25

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