77

Why would this work

timeout 10s echo "foo bar" # foo bar

but this wouldn't

function echoFooBar {
  echo "foo bar"
}

echoFooBar # foo bar

timeout 10s echoFooBar # timeout: failed to run command `echoFooBar': No such file or directory

and how can I make it work?

10 Answers 10

64

timeout is a command - so it is executing in a subprocess of your bash shell. Therefore it has no access to your functions defined in your current shell.

The command timeout is given is executed as a subprocess of timeout - a grand-child process of your shell.

You might be confused because echo is both a shell built-in and a separate command.

What you can do is put your function in it's own script file, chmod it to be executable, then execute it with timeout.

Alternatively fork, executing your function in a sub-shell - and in the original process, monitor the progress, killing the subprocess if it takes too long.

  • thank you for your solution! But as I want to add timeout as an additional option for an existing script, it would be quite unconvenient to have an own file just for the timeout functionality. Is this the only solution? – speendo Mar 31 '12 at 10:01
  • 6
    @speendo Consider that timeout works by killing processes by sending them signals - that is something you can only do to processes. Therefore whatever you run with timeout needs to be it's own process. – Douglas Leeder Mar 31 '12 at 15:33
  • 2
    @speendo Also note that bash is (AFAIK) single-threaded, so what could do the timeout functionality if the thread is executing your function? – Douglas Leeder Mar 31 '12 at 15:33
63

As Douglas Leeder said you need a separate process for timeout to signal to. Workaround by exporting function to subshells and running subshell manually.

export -f echoFooBar
timeout 10s bash -c echoFooBar
28

There's an inline alternative also launching a subprocess of bash shell:


timeout 10s bash <<EOT
function echoFooBar {
  echo foo
}

echoFooBar
sleep 20
EOT

  • Here Document sub-process is unaware to parent process functions (i.e. "command not found" error), so make sure to export -f parent_func (or set -o allexport for all functions in advance), in the parent shell process. – Noam Manos May 20 '20 at 8:22
10

You can create a function which would allow you to do the same as timeout but also for other functions:

function run_cmd { 
    cmd="$1"; timeout="$2";
    grep -qP '^\d+$' <<< $timeout || timeout=10

    ( 
        eval "$cmd" &
        child=$!
        trap -- "" SIGTERM 
        (       
                sleep $timeout
                kill $child 2> /dev/null 
        ) &     
        wait $child
    )
}

And could run as below:

run_cmd "echoFooBar" 10

Note: The solution came from one of my questions: Elegant solution to implement timeout for bash commands and functions

  • shouldn't the innermost subshell also be killed after wait $child? it does not do anything harmfull (apart from waiting), but it still keeps counting, even if the child has finished – phil294 Sep 14 '17 at 21:48
  • That's very useful. I personally find it more readable in a script to have a timeout for the most recent subprocess rather than doing eval $cmd. So for me it looks like this: timeout_child () { trap -- "" SIGTERM; child=$!; timeout=$1; ( sleep $timeout; kill $child; ) & wait $child; } And the usage: ( while true; do echo -n .; sleep 0.1; done) & timeout_child 2 – TauPan Feb 6 '19 at 9:19
6

if you just want to add timeout as an additional option for the entire existing script, you can make it test for the timeout-option, and then make it call it self recursively without that option.

example.sh:

#!/bin/bash
if [ "$1" == "-t" ]; then
  timeout 1m $0 $2
else
  #the original script
  echo $1
  sleep 2m
  echo YAWN...
fi

running this script without timeout:

$./example.sh -other_option # -other_option
                            # YAWN...

running it with a one minute timeout:

$./example.sh -t -other_option # -other_option
4
function foo(){
    for i in {1..100};
    do 
        echo $i;  
        sleep 1;
    done;
}

cat <( foo ) # Will work 
timeout 3 cat <( foo ) # Will Work 
timeout 3 cat <( foo ) | sort # Wont work, As sort will fail 
cat <( timeout 3 cat <( foo ) ) | sort -r # Will Work 
1

This function uses only builtins

  • Maybe consider evaling "$*" instead of running $@ directly depending on your needs

  • It starts a job with the command string specified after the first arg that is the timeout value and monitors the job pid

  • It checks every 1 seconds, bash supports timeouts down to 0.01 so that can be tweaked

  • Also if your script needs stdin, read should rely on a dedicated fd (exec {tofd}<> <(:))

  • Also you might want to tweak the kill signal (the one inside the loop) which is default to -15, you might want -9

## forking is evil
timeout() {
    to=$1; shift
    $@ & local wp=$! start=0
     while kill -0 $wp; do
        read -t 1
        start=$((start+1))
        if [ $start -ge $to ]; then
            kill $wp && break
        fi
    done
}
1

Putting my comment to Tiago Lopo's answer into more readable form:

I think it's more readable to impose a timeout on the most recent subshell, this way we don't need to eval a string and the whole script can be highlighted as shell by your favourite editor. I simply put the commands after the subshell with eval has spawned into a shell-function (tested with zsh, but should work with bash):

timeout_child () {
    trap -- "" SIGTERM
    child=$!
    timeout=$1
    (
            sleep $timeout
            kill $child
    ) &
    wait $child
}

Example usage:

( while true; do echo -n .; sleep 0.1; done) & timeout_child 2

And this way it also works with a shell function (if it runs in the background):

 print_dots () {
     while true
     do
         sleep 0.1
         echo -n .
     done
 }


 > print_dots & timeout_child 2
 [1] 21725
 [3] 21727
 ...................[1]    21725 terminated  print_dots
 [3]  + 21727 done       ( sleep $timeout; kill $child; )
  • 1
    I really like the approach, but if I use this multiple times in a script it only works the first time. @Tiago Lopo's solution works multiple times. – CristianCantoro Apr 1 '19 at 9:16
1

I have a slight modification of @Tiago Lopo's answer that can handle commands with multiple arguments. I've also tested TauPan's solution, but it does not work if you use it multiple times in a script, while Tiago's does.

function timeout_cmd { 
  local arr
  local cmd
  local timeout

  arr=( "$@" )

  # timeout: first arg
  # cmd: the other args
  timeout="${arr[0]}"
  cmd=( "${arr[@]:1}" )

  ( 
    eval "${cmd[@]}" &
    child=$!

    echo "child: $child"
    trap -- "" SIGTERM 
    (       
      sleep "$timeout"
      kill "$child" 2> /dev/null 
    ) &     
    wait "$child"
  )
}

Here's a fully functional script thant you can use to test the function above:

$ ./test_timeout.sh -h
Usage:
  test_timeout.sh [-n] [-r REPEAT] [-s SLEEP_TIME] [-t TIMEOUT]
  test_timeout.sh -h

Test timeout_cmd function.

Options:
  -n              Dry run, do not actually sleep. 
  -r REPEAT       Reapeat everything multiple times [default: 1].
  -s SLEEP_TIME   Sleep for SLEEP_TIME seconds [default: 5].
  -t TIMEOUT      Timeout after TIMEOUT seconds [default: no timeout].

For example you cnal launch like this:

$ ./test_timeout.sh -r 2 -s 5 -t 3
Try no: 1
  - Set timeout to: 3
child: 2540
    -> retval: 143
    -> The command timed out
Try no: 2
  - Set timeout to: 3
child: 2593
    -> retval: 143
    -> The command timed out
Done!
#!/usr/bin/env bash

#shellcheck disable=SC2128
SOURCED=false && [ "$0" = "$BASH_SOURCE" ] || SOURCED=true

if ! $SOURCED; then
  set -euo pipefail
  IFS=$'\n\t'
fi

#################### helpers
function check_posint() {
  local re='^[0-9]+$'
  local mynum="$1"
  local option="$2"

  if ! [[ "$mynum" =~ $re ]] ; then
     (echo -n "Error in option '$option': " >&2)
     (echo "must be a positive integer, got $mynum." >&2)
     exit 1
  fi

  if ! [ "$mynum" -gt 0 ] ; then
     (echo "Error in option '$option': must be positive, got $mynum." >&2)
     exit 1
  fi
}
#################### end: helpers

#################### usage
function short_usage() {
  (>&2 echo \
"Usage:
  test_timeout.sh [-n] [-r REPEAT] [-s SLEEP_TIME] [-t TIMEOUT]
  test_timeout.sh -h"
  )
}

function usage() {
  (>&2 short_usage )
  (>&2 echo \
"
Test timeout_cmd function.

Options:
  -n              Dry run, do not actually sleep. 
  -r REPEAT       Reapeat everything multiple times [default: 1].
  -s SLEEP_TIME   Sleep for SLEEP_TIME seconds [default: 5].
  -t TIMEOUT      Timeout after TIMEOUT seconds [default: no timeout].
")
}
#################### end: usage

help_flag=false
dryrun_flag=false
SLEEP_TIME=5
TIMEOUT=-1
REPEAT=1

while getopts ":hnr:s:t:" opt; do
  case $opt in
    h)
      help_flag=true
      ;;    
    n)
      dryrun_flag=true
      ;;
    r)
      check_posint "$OPTARG" '-r'

      REPEAT="$OPTARG"
      ;;
    s)
      check_posint "$OPTARG" '-s'

      SLEEP_TIME="$OPTARG"
      ;;
    t)
      check_posint "$OPTARG" '-t'

      TIMEOUT="$OPTARG"
      ;;
    \?)
      (>&2 echo "Error. Invalid option: -$OPTARG.")
      (>&2 echo "Try -h to get help")
      short_usage
      exit 1
      ;;
    :)
      (>&2 echo "Error.Option -$OPTARG requires an argument.")
      (>&2 echo "Try -h to get help")
      short_usage
      exit 1
      ;;
  esac
done

if $help_flag; then
  usage
  exit 0
fi

#################### utils
if $dryrun_flag; then
  function wrap_run() {
    ( echo -en "[dry run]\\t" )
    ( echo "$@" )
  }
else
  function wrap_run() { "$@"; }
fi

# Execute a shell function with timeout
# https://stackoverflow.com/a/24416732/2377454
function timeout_cmd { 
  local arr
  local cmd
  local timeout

  arr=( "$@" )

  # timeout: first arg
  # cmd: the other args
  timeout="${arr[0]}"
  cmd=( "${arr[@]:1}" )

  ( 
    eval "${cmd[@]}" &
    child=$!

    echo "child: $child"
    trap -- "" SIGTERM 
    (       
      sleep "$timeout"
      kill "$child" 2> /dev/null 
    ) &     
    wait "$child"
  )
}
####################

function sleep_func() {
  local secs
  local waitsec

  waitsec=1
  secs=$(($1))
  while [ "$secs" -gt 0 ]; do
   echo -ne "$secs\033[0K\r"
   sleep "$waitsec"
   secs=$((secs-waitsec))
  done

}

command=("wrap_run" \
         "sleep_func" "${SLEEP_TIME}"
         )

for i in $(seq 1 "$REPEAT"); do
  echo "Try no: $i"

  if [ "$TIMEOUT" -gt 0 ]; then
    echo "  - Set timeout to: $TIMEOUT"
    set +e
    timeout_cmd "$TIMEOUT" "${command[@]}"
    retval="$?"
    set -e

    echo "    -> retval: $retval"
    # check if (retval % 128) == SIGTERM (== 15)
    if [[ "$((retval % 128))" -eq 15 ]]; then
      echo "    -> The command timed out"
    fi
  else
    echo "  - No timeout"
    "${command[@]}"
    retval="$?"
  fi
done

echo "Done!"

exit 0
-1

This one liner will exit your Bash session after 10s

$ TMOUT=10 && echo "foo bar"
  • 1
    This exits the parent bash session entirely after 10s, which is not at all what the OP was asking for – danielpops Mar 18 '20 at 20:20

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