20

I found the following regex from another Stack Overflow question: Change an element's class with JavaScript

And have used it in part of my script with success, however in another it seems to be failing.

I threw together a very minimalist test case on jsFiddle, and it is also failing:

http://jsfiddle.net/ew47Y/1/

HTML:

<div class="foo" id="foo">
    hello
</div>​

JS:

$(document).ready(function(){
     foo = document.getElementById('foo');
     foo.className += ' bar foobar';
     alert(foo.className);
     foo.className.replace( /(?:^|\s)bar(?!\S)/ , '' )
     alert(foo.className);
})​
3
40

That's because replace doesn't actually modify the string you call it on; rather, it returns a new string. So:

     foo.className = foo.className.replace( /(?:^|\s)bar(?!\S)/ , '' )

(By the way, you don't actually need to do this in raw JavaScript, since jQuery objects offer a removeClass method: http://api.jquery.com/removeClass/. So you could write:

     $('#foo').removeClass('bar');

or:

     $(foo).removeClass('bar');

)

6
  • 15
    Pure JS function: function removeClass(e,c) {e.className = e.className.replace( new RegExp('(?:^|\\s)'+c+'(?!\\S)') ,'');}
    – pawelglow
    Jan 17 '13 at 15:18
  • If you want to remove all the occurrences of a class name use the g modifier at the end of the regular expression, like this: foo.className.replace(/(^|\s)bar(?!\S)/g ,''). By the way, the use of the non-capturing group (?:) is not neccessary here.
    – Adam
    Jun 3 '13 at 14:33
  • 1
    Note that the use of the word boundary metacharacter \b, like: foo.className.replace(/\bbar\b/g ,''), is not suitable here, because the word boundary occurs also between a word character [A-Za-z0-9_] and the dash - character. Therefore a class name e.g. 'different-bar-class' would also be replaced resulting in 'different--class'. However, as opposed to the above solutions, the "\b" solution doesn't remove the whitespace character \s before the class name, so a string e.g. 'firstbar bar' will end up as 'firstbar '.
    – Adam
    Jun 3 '13 at 15:41
  • 1
    @Adam: I have no idea what you're talking about. Your comment is the only place on this page that even mentions \b, so you hardly need to explain why it's inappropriate. And the use of a group is necessary; your personal preference for capturing groups (...) over non-capturing groups (?:...) is not of interest to anyone else.
    – ruakh
    Jun 3 '13 at 17:20
  • 1
    The double negation in the look-ahead (?!\S) seems unnecessary. I would rather use (?=\s|$), seems clearer. Feb 17 '16 at 14:08
23

Don't forget about classList.

el.classList.remove('boop');

http://jsfiddle.net/yXQL3/

1
6
foo.className = foo.className.replace( /(?:^|\s)bar(?!\S)/ , '' );

or with jQuery (which you seem to be using):

foo.removeClass( 'bar' );
1

There is also a solution which use the word boundary metacharacter \b:

foo.className.replace(/\bbar\b/g ,'');

This can suite somebody, but be aware the word boundary occurs also between a word character [A-Za-z0-9_] and the dash - character. Therefore a class name e.g. 'different-bar-class' would also be replaced resulting in 'different--class'. However, as opposed to the above solutions, the "\b" solution doesn't remove the whitespace character \s before the class name, which may be desired, so a string e.g. 'firstbar bar' will end up as 'firstbar '.

0

The top answer in the OP's linked post as well as a related answer show how to do this in modern browsers with plain JavaScript and no regex using just something like:

element.classList.remove("classname");

See the documentation for more details and examples. My favourite is to use toggle("classname") to add or remove classname accordingly.

EDIT: Just seen that a similar answer has been posted here already, so upvotes should go there. Leaving this here for the links and the toggle bit.

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