For Android Versions 3.0 and higher, I want to call a certain method. Is there a way to check if a certain method is available in the running Android Version?

To be more precise, my MinSDK is 7 (Android 2.1), TargetSDK is 8 (Android 2.2) and I need to test if HoneyComb Android 3.0 or higher is running. Depending on that, how can I call that HoneyComb method?

The second part of the question arises, because simply calling that HoneyComb method, will not compile, as I am building against 2.2.

up vote 27 down vote accepted

To be more precise, my MinSDK is 7 (Android 2.1), TargetSDK is 8 (Android 2.2) and I need to test if HoneyComb Android 3.0 or higher is running. Depending on that, how can I call that HoneyComb method?

Step #1: Set your build target to the highest API level you wish to call directly and therefore compile against. Your build target (e.g., compileSdkVersion in Android Studio, Project > Properties > Android in Eclipse) is not related to your android:targetSdkVersion.

Step #2: As the other answers have indicated, you can then conditionally call methods within a guard block:

if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT>=android.os.Build.VERSION_CODES.HONEYCOMB) {
  // call something for API Level 11+
}

The second part of the question arises, because simply calling that HoneyComb method, will not compile, as I am building against 2.2.

You need to change your build target to be API Level 11 or higher if you wish to directly call API Level 11 or higher methods.

  • 5
    It's also worth mentioning that android.os.Build.VERSION_CODES.* members are replaced at compile time (iirc, right?), so he doesn't need to worry about HONEYCOMB, HONEYCOMB_MR2 and so on not being available (i.e., defined) on systems running Gingerbread and below... he can check against them on previous systems. – davidcesarino Mar 31 '12 at 23:45
  • Great tx, I was falsely assuming that the eclipe build target relates to android:targetVersion. Yipee! – mrd Apr 1 '12 at 2:59
  • The only thing which is less nice, is that this forces me to test on my HoneyComb tablet instead of my 2 mobile phones. Luckily, it is only a single statement, so I comment it out until the development is finished. I never use the emulator for testing, to slow... – mrd Apr 1 '12 at 3:10
  • The official Android emulator is very slow indeed. I do testing with the BlueStacks emulator instead, it is much faster (running in debug mode is slower than in release mode, but it is still usable). – Remy Lebeau Sep 22 '14 at 1:41
if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= x ) {}

x is the api number, Honeycomb is 11 you can find api numbers here: Platform versions

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