124

I'm trying to write a function that does the following:

  • takes an array of integers as an argument (e.g. [1,2,3,4])
  • creates an array of all the possible permutations of [1,2,3,4], with each permutation having a length of 4

the function below (I found it online) does this by taking a string as an argument, and returning all the permutations of that string

I could not figure out how to modify it to make it work with an array of integers, (I think this has something to do with how some of the methods work differently on strings than they do on integers, but I'm not sure...)

var permArr = [], usedChars = [];
function permute(input) {
  var i, ch, chars = input.split("");
  for (i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
    ch = chars.splice(i, 1);
    usedChars.push(ch);
    if (chars.length == 0)
      permArr[permArr.length] = usedChars.join("");
    permute(chars.join(""));
    chars.splice(i, 0, ch);
    usedChars.pop();
  }
  return permArr
};

Note: I'm looking to make the function return arrays of integers, not an array of strings.

I really need the solution to be in JavaScript. I've already figured out how to do this in python

32 Answers 32

95

If you notice, the code actually splits the chars into an array prior to do any permutation, so you simply remove the join and split operation

var permArr = [],
  usedChars = [];

function permute(input) {
  var i, ch;
  for (i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
    ch = input.splice(i, 1)[0];
    usedChars.push(ch);
    if (input.length == 0) {
      permArr.push(usedChars.slice());
    }
    permute(input);
    input.splice(i, 0, ch);
    usedChars.pop();
  }
  return permArr
};


document.write(JSON.stringify(permute([5, 3, 7, 1])));

  • @pepperdreamteam thanks for giving me chance to fix it lol – Andreas Wong Apr 1 '12 at 1:14
  • @SiGanteng. Something weird is happening to me trying to use your function. I keep it in a .js where I have all my "list manipulation function". If I use it with permute([1,2,3]), and later permute([4,5,6]), the output of the later still have the result, output from the first one. Any idea how to fix that ? Many thanks ! – 500 Jul 6 '12 at 13:24
  • 2
    There's a new question about this answer. – Anderson Green Feb 13 '14 at 2:46
  • 1
    Explained here: stackoverflow.com/a/21745151/2102634 – Rick Hanlon II Feb 13 '14 at 4:18
  • 8
    Accessing globals in your function, bad form! – Shmiddty Oct 15 '16 at 14:54
116

Little late, but like to add a slightly more elegant version here. Can be any array...

function permutator(inputArr) {
  var results = [];

  function permute(arr, memo) {
    var cur, memo = memo || [];

    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
      cur = arr.splice(i, 1);
      if (arr.length === 0) {
        results.push(memo.concat(cur));
      }
      permute(arr.slice(), memo.concat(cur));
      arr.splice(i, 0, cur[0]);
    }

    return results;
  }

  return permute(inputArr);
}

Adding an ES6 (2015) version. Also does not mutate the original input array. Works in the console in Chrome...

const permutator = (inputArr) => {
  let result = [];

  const permute = (arr, m = []) => {
    if (arr.length === 0) {
      result.push(m)
    } else {
      for (let i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        let curr = arr.slice();
        let next = curr.splice(i, 1);
        permute(curr.slice(), m.concat(next))
     }
   }
 }

 permute(inputArr)

 return result;
}

So...

permutator(['c','a','t']);

Yields...

[ [ 'c', 'a', 't' ],
  [ 'c', 't', 'a' ],
  [ 'a', 'c', 't' ],
  [ 'a', 't', 'c' ],
  [ 't', 'c', 'a' ],
  [ 't', 'a', 'c' ] ]

And...

permutator([1,2,3]);

Yields...

[ [ 1, 2, 3 ],
  [ 1, 3, 2 ],
  [ 2, 1, 3 ],
  [ 2, 3, 1 ],
  [ 3, 1, 2 ],
  [ 3, 2, 1 ] ]
  • If you have a factorial function handy (as is fairly likely considering you are dealing with permutations), you could speed it up by changing the outer scope initialization to var results = new Array(factorial(inputArr.length)), length=0, then replace results.push(…) with results[length++]=… – Cyoce Apr 18 '16 at 22:37
  • What does line var cur, memo = memo || []; do ? – Ricevind Apr 26 '16 at 14:08
  • 1
    @user2965967 It declares cur and memo, and it initializes memo to be the value of memo, unless it is falsey (including undefined), in which case it will be an empty array. In other words, it's a less than ideal way to provide the function parameter with a default value. – Mr. Lavalamp May 19 '16 at 21:52
  • This modifies the original array. – Shmiddty Oct 15 '16 at 14:55
  • Added an ES6 (2015) version. There is no mutation of the original array in the ES6 version. – delimited Jan 13 '17 at 21:06
68

The following very efficient algorithm uses Heap's method to generate all permutations of N elements with runtime complexity in O(N!):

function permute(permutation) {
  var length = permutation.length,
      result = [permutation.slice()],
      c = new Array(length).fill(0),
      i = 1, k, p;

  while (i < length) {
    if (c[i] < i) {
      k = i % 2 && c[i];
      p = permutation[i];
      permutation[i] = permutation[k];
      permutation[k] = p;
      ++c[i];
      i = 1;
      result.push(permutation.slice());
    } else {
      c[i] = 0;
      ++i;
    }
  }
  return result;
}

console.log(permute([1, 2, 3]));

The same algorithm implemented as a generator with space complexity in O(N):

function* permute(permutation) {
  var length = permutation.length,
      c = Array(length).fill(0),
      i = 1, k, p;

  yield permutation.slice();
  while (i < length) {
    if (c[i] < i) {
      k = i % 2 && c[i];
      p = permutation[i];
      permutation[i] = permutation[k];
      permutation[k] = p;
      ++c[i];
      i = 1;
      yield permutation.slice();
    } else {
      c[i] = 0;
      ++i;
    }
  }
}

// Memory efficient iteration through permutations:
for (var permutation of permute([1, 2, 3])) console.log(permutation);

// Simple array conversion:
var permutations = [...permute([1, 2, 3])];

Performance comparison

Feel free to add your implementation to the following benchmark.js test suite:

function permute_SiGanteng(input) {
  var permArr = [],
    usedChars = [];

  function permute(input) {
    var i, ch;
    for (i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
      ch = input.splice(i, 1)[0];
      usedChars.push(ch);
      if (input.length == 0) {
        permArr.push(usedChars.slice());
      }
      permute(input);
      input.splice(i, 0, ch);
      usedChars.pop();
    }
    return permArr
  }
  return permute(input);
}

function permute_delimited(inputArr) {
  var results = [];

  function permute(arr, memo) {
    var cur, memo = memo || [];
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
      cur = arr.splice(i, 1);
      if (arr.length === 0) {
        results.push(memo.concat(cur));
      }
      permute(arr.slice(), memo.concat(cur));
      arr.splice(i, 0, cur[0]);
    }
    return results;
  }
  return permute(inputArr);
}

function permute_monkey(inputArray) {
  return inputArray.reduce(function permute(res, item, key, arr) {
    return res.concat(arr.length > 1 && arr.slice(0, key).concat(arr.slice(key + 1)).reduce(permute, []).map(function(perm) {
      return [item].concat(perm);
    }) || item);
  }, []);
}

function permute_Oriol(input) {
  var permArr = [],
    usedChars = [];
  return (function main() {
    for (var i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
      var ch = input.splice(i, 1)[0];
      usedChars.push(ch);
      if (input.length == 0) {
        permArr.push(usedChars.slice());
      }
      main();
      input.splice(i, 0, ch);
      usedChars.pop();
    }
    return permArr;
  })();
}

function permute_MarkusT(input) {
  function permutate(array, callback) {
      function p(array, index, callback) {
          function swap(a, i1, i2) {
              var t = a[i1];
              a[i1] = a[i2];
              a[i2] = t;
          }
          if (index == array.length - 1) {
              callback(array);
              return 1;
          } else {
              var count = p(array, index + 1, callback);
              for (var i = index + 1; i < array.length; i++) {
                  swap(array, i, index);
                  count += p(array, index + 1, callback);
                  swap(array, i, index);
              }
              return count;
          }
      }
      if (!array || array.length == 0) {
          return 0;
      }
      return p(array, 0, callback);
  }
  var result = [];
  permutate(input, function(a) {
      result.push(a.slice(0));
  });
  return result;
}

function permute_le_m(permutation) {
  var length = permutation.length,
  		result = [permutation.slice()],
      c = new Array(length).fill(0),
      i = 1, k, p;
  
  while (i < length) {
    if (c[i] < i) {
      k = i % 2 && c[i],
      p = permutation[i];
      permutation[i] = permutation[k];
      permutation[k] = p;
      ++c[i];
      i = 1;
      result.push(permutation.slice());
    } else {
      c[i] = 0;
      ++i;
    }
  }
  return result;
}

function permute_Urielzen(arr) {
    var finalArr = [];
    var iterator = function (arrayTaken, tree) {
        for (var i = 0; i < tree; i++) {
            var temp = arrayTaken.slice();
            temp.splice(tree - 1 - i, 0, temp.splice(tree - 1, 1)[0]);
            if (tree >= arr.length) {
                finalArr.push(temp);
            } else { iterator(temp, tree + 1); }
        }
    }
    iterator(arr, 1); return finalArr;
}

function permute_Taylor_Hakes(arr) {
  var permutations = [];
  if (arr.length === 1) {
    return [ arr ];
  }

  for (var i = 0; i <  arr.length; i++) { 
    var subPerms = permute_Taylor_Hakes(arr.slice(0, i).concat(arr.slice(i + 1)));
    for (var j = 0; j < subPerms.length; j++) {
      subPerms[j].unshift(arr[i]);
      permutations.push(subPerms[j]);
    }
  }
  return permutations;
}

var Combinatorics = (function () {
    'use strict';
    var version = "0.5.2";
    /* combinatory arithmetics */
    var P = function(m, n) {
        var p = 1;
        while (n--) p *= m--;
        return p;
    };
    var C = function(m, n) {
        if (n > m) {
            return 0;
        }
        return P(m, n) / P(n, n);
    };
    var factorial = function(n) {
        return P(n, n);
    };
    var factoradic = function(n, d) {
        var f = 1;
        if (!d) {
            for (d = 1; f < n; f *= ++d);
            if (f > n) f /= d--;
        } else {
            f = factorial(d);
        }
        var result = [0];
        for (; d; f /= d--) {
            result[d] = Math.floor(n / f);
            n %= f;
        }
        return result;
    };
    /* common methods */
    var addProperties = function(dst, src) {
        Object.keys(src).forEach(function(p) {
            Object.defineProperty(dst, p, {
                value: src[p],
                configurable: p == 'next'
            });
        });
    };
    var hideProperty = function(o, p) {
        Object.defineProperty(o, p, {
            writable: true
        });
    };
    var toArray = function(f) {
        var e, result = [];
        this.init();
        while (e = this.next()) result.push(f ? f(e) : e);
        this.init();
        return result;
    };
    var common = {
        toArray: toArray,
        map: toArray,
        forEach: function(f) {
            var e;
            this.init();
            while (e = this.next()) f(e);
            this.init();
        },
        filter: function(f) {
            var e, result = [];
            this.init();
            while (e = this.next()) if (f(e)) result.push(e);
            this.init();
            return result;
        },
        lazyMap: function(f) {
            this._lazyMap = f;
            return this;
        },
        lazyFilter: function(f) {
            Object.defineProperty(this, 'next', {
                writable: true
            });
            if (typeof f !== 'function') {
                this.next = this._next;
            } else {
                if (typeof (this._next) !== 'function') {
                    this._next = this.next;
                }
                var _next = this._next.bind(this);
                this.next = (function() {
                    var e;
                    while (e = _next()) {
                        if (f(e))
                            return e;
                    }
                    return e;
                }).bind(this);
            }
            Object.defineProperty(this, 'next', {
                writable: false
            });
            return this;
        }

    };
    /* power set */
    var power = function(ary, fun) {
        var size = 1 << ary.length,
            sizeOf = function() {
                return size;
            },
            that = Object.create(ary.slice(), {
                length: {
                    get: sizeOf
                }
            });
        hideProperty(that, 'index');
        addProperties(that, {
            valueOf: sizeOf,
            init: function() {
                that.index = 0;
            },
            nth: function(n) {
                if (n >= size) return;
                var i = 0,
                    result = [];
                for (; n; n >>>= 1, i++) if (n & 1) result.push(this[i]);
                return (typeof (that._lazyMap) === 'function')?that._lazyMap(result):result;
            },
            next: function() {
                return this.nth(this.index++);
            }
        });
        addProperties(that, common);
        that.init();
        return (typeof (fun) === 'function') ? that.map(fun) : that;
    };
    /* combination */
    var nextIndex = function(n) {
        var smallest = n & -n,
            ripple = n + smallest,
            new_smallest = ripple & -ripple,
            ones = ((new_smallest / smallest) >> 1) - 1;
        return ripple | ones;
    };
    var combination = function(ary, nelem, fun) {
        if (!nelem) nelem = ary.length;
        if (nelem < 1) throw new RangeError;
        if (nelem > ary.length) throw new RangeError;
        var first = (1 << nelem) - 1,
            size = C(ary.length, nelem),
            maxIndex = 1 << ary.length,
            sizeOf = function() {
                return size;
            },
            that = Object.create(ary.slice(), {
                length: {
                    get: sizeOf
                }
            });
        hideProperty(that, 'index');
        addProperties(that, {
            valueOf: sizeOf,
            init: function() {
                this.index = first;
            },
            next: function() {
                if (this.index >= maxIndex) return;
                var i = 0,
                    n = this.index,
                    result = [];
                for (; n; n >>>= 1, i++) {
                    if (n & 1) result[result.length] = this[i];
                }

                this.index = nextIndex(this.index);
                return (typeof (that._lazyMap) === 'function')?that._lazyMap(result):result;
            }
        });
        addProperties(that, common);
        that.init();
        return (typeof (fun) === 'function') ? that.map(fun) : that;
    };
    /* permutation */
    var _permutation = function(ary) {
        var that = ary.slice(),
            size = factorial(that.length);
        that.index = 0;
        that.next = function() {
            if (this.index >= size) return;
            var copy = this.slice(),
                digits = factoradic(this.index, this.length),
                result = [],
                i = this.length - 1;
            for (; i >= 0; --i) result.push(copy.splice(digits[i], 1)[0]);
            this.index++;
            return (typeof (that._lazyMap) === 'function')?that._lazyMap(result):result;
        };
        return that;
    };
    // which is really a permutation of combination
    var permutation = function(ary, nelem, fun) {
        if (!nelem) nelem = ary.length;
        if (nelem < 1) throw new RangeError;
        if (nelem > ary.length) throw new RangeError;
        var size = P(ary.length, nelem),
            sizeOf = function() {
                return size;
            },
            that = Object.create(ary.slice(), {
                length: {
                    get: sizeOf
                }
            });
        hideProperty(that, 'cmb');
        hideProperty(that, 'per');
        addProperties(that, {
            valueOf: function() {
                return size;
            },
            init: function() {
                this.cmb = combination(ary, nelem);
                this.per = _permutation(this.cmb.next());
            },
            next: function() {
                var result = this.per.next();
                if (!result) {
                    var cmb = this.cmb.next();
                    if (!cmb) return;
                    this.per = _permutation(cmb);
                    return this.next();
                }
                return (typeof (that._lazyMap) === 'function')?that._lazyMap(result):result;
            }
        });
        addProperties(that, common);
        that.init();
        return (typeof (fun) === 'function') ? that.map(fun) : that;
    };

    /* export */
    var Combinatorics = Object.create(null);
    addProperties(Combinatorics, {
        C: C,
        P: P,
        factorial: factorial,
        factoradic: factoradic,
        permutation: permutation,
    });
    return Combinatorics;
})();

function permute_Technicalbloke(inputArray) {
  if (inputArray.length === 1) return inputArray;
  return inputArray.reduce( function(accumulator,_,index){
    permute_Technicalbloke([...inputArray.slice(0,index),...inputArray.slice(index+1)])
    .map(value=>accumulator.push([inputArray[index],value]));
    return accumulator;
  },[]);
}

var suite = new Benchmark.Suite;
var input = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4];

suite.add('permute_SiGanteng', function() {
    permute_SiGanteng(input);
  })
  .add('permute_delimited', function() {
    permute_delimited(input);
  })
  .add('permute_monkey', function() {
    permute_monkey(input);
  })
  .add('permute_Oriol', function() {
    permute_Oriol(input);
  })
  .add('permute_MarkusT', function() {
    permute_MarkusT(input);
  })
  .add('permute_le_m', function() {
    permute_le_m(input);
  })
  .add('permute_Urielzen', function() {
    permute_Urielzen(input);
  })
  .add('permute_Taylor_Hakes', function() {
    permute_Taylor_Hakes(input);
  })
  .add('permute_Combinatorics', function() {
    Combinatorics.permutation(input).toArray();
  })
  .add('permute_Technicalbloke', function() {
    permute_Technicalbloke(input);
  })
  .on('cycle', function(event) {
    console.log(String(event.target));
  })
  .on('complete', function() {
    console.log('Fastest is ' + this.filter('fastest').map('name'));
  })
  .run({async: true});
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.4/lodash.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/platform/1.3.4/platform.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/benchmark/2.1.4/benchmark.min.js"></script>

Run-time results for Chrome 48:

  • 1
    How can this code be changed to deliver results for a fixed n = 2? For example, suppose we have a set of three letters: A, B, and C. We might ask how many ways we can arrange 2 letters from that set. Each possible arrangement would be an example of a permutation. The complete list of possible permutations would be: AB, AC, BA, BC, CA, and CB. – a4xrbj1 Oct 27 '16 at 15:21
  • 1
    @a4xrbj1 See e.g. the code sample in this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/37892738/… - or are you specifically asking about modifying this (Heap's) method? – le_m Oct 29 '16 at 0:51
  • @le_m yes, specifically using this (Heap's) method as it's so fast – a4xrbj1 Oct 29 '16 at 8:37
  • @a4xrbj1 I would compute all combinations of fixed length n (e.g. AB, AC, BC for n = 2) using a similar strategy to the link given above (see also stackoverflow.com/questions/127704/…) and then for each combination compute all of its permutations using Heap's method. Special cases such as n = 2 can of course be optimized. – le_m Oct 30 '16 at 0:23
  • This answer is so much superior to the the accepted answer! Especially the generator version, if you want permutations of anything more than a tiny array, this is the way to go. – Juraj Petrik Dec 3 '16 at 11:44
40
var inputArray = [1, 2, 3];

var result = inputArray.reduce(function permute(res, item, key, arr) {
    return res.concat(arr.length > 1 && arr.slice(0, key).concat(arr.slice(key + 1)).reduce(permute, []).map(function(perm) { return [item].concat(perm); }) || item);
}, []);


alert(JSON.stringify(result));
  • 10
    Wow, despite its terseness and lack of docs, I think this is the most elegant answer. My explanation of this algorithm is: For every item in the array (reduce), select all other items, permute them (recursively), and concat to this item. – aaron Oct 15 '14 at 3:57
  • Tried this solution here: codewars.com/kata/reviews/5254ca2719453dcc0b000280/groups/… I've unwrapped the original golf code into a readable one, but it's essentially the same. The problem with it is that it produces duplicates, and I had to do an additional .filter(uniq) on the result. – Andrey Mikhaylov - lolmaus Sep 18 '15 at 7:59
  • 1
    is there a lisp parallel to the concept [1,2,3].length == 3 && "foo" || "bar"or [1,2].length == 3 && "foo" || "bar" oh my! there is! (or (and (= 3 2) (print "hello!")) (print "goodbye")) – Dmitry Nov 12 '16 at 13:39
  • @lolmaus-AndreyMikhaylov how to remove duplicacy please Update the answer if you can – Pardeep Jain Nov 21 '16 at 15:05
  • @PardeepJain I gave a link to my solution above. – Andrey Mikhaylov - lolmaus Nov 21 '16 at 17:48
21

I have improved SiGanteng's answer.

Now it is possible to call permute more than once, because permArr and usedChars are cleared each time.

function permute(input) {
    var permArr = [],
        usedChars = [];
    return (function main() {
        for (var i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
            var ch = input.splice(i, 1)[0];
            usedChars.push(ch);
            if (input.length == 0) {
                permArr.push(usedChars.slice());
            }
            main();
            input.splice(i, 0, ch);
            usedChars.pop();
        }
        return permArr;
    })();
}

function permute(input) {
  var permArr = [],
      usedChars = [];
  return (function main() {
    for (var i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
      var ch = input.splice(i, 1)[0];
      usedChars.push(ch);
      if (input.length == 0) {
        permArr.push(usedChars.slice());
      }
      main();
      input.splice(i, 0, ch);
      usedChars.pop();
    }
    return permArr;
  })();
}
document.write(JSON.stringify(permute([5, 3, 7, 1])));

10

The following function permutates an array of any type and calls a specified callback function on each permutation found:

/*
  Permutate the elements in the specified array by swapping them
  in-place and calling the specified callback function on the array
  for each permutation.

  Return the number of permutations.

  If array is undefined, null or empty, return 0.

  NOTE: when permutation succeeds, the array should be in the original state
  on exit!
*/
  function permutate(array, callback) {
    // Do the actual permuation work on array[], starting at index
    function p(array, index, callback) {
      // Swap elements i1 and i2 in array a[]
      function swap(a, i1, i2) {
        var t = a[i1];
        a[i1] = a[i2];
        a[i2] = t;
      }

      if (index == array.length - 1) {
        callback(array);
        return 1;
      } else {
        var count = p(array, index + 1, callback);
        for (var i = index + 1; i < array.length; i++) {
          swap(array, i, index);
          count += p(array, index + 1, callback);
          swap(array, i, index);
        }
        return count;
      }
    }

    if (!array || array.length == 0) {
      return 0;
    }
    return p(array, 0, callback);
  }

If you call it like this:

  // Empty array to hold results
  var result = [];
  // Permutate [1, 2, 3], pushing every permutation onto result[]
  permutate([1, 2, 3], function (a) {
    // Create a copy of a[] and add that to result[]
    result.push(a.slice(0));
  });
  // Show result[]
  document.write(result);

I think it will do exactly what you need - fill an array called result with the permutations of the array [1, 2, 3]. The result is:

[[1,2,3],[1,3,2],[2,1,3],[2,3,1],[3,2,1],[3,1,2]]

Slightly clearer code on JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/MgmMg/6/

7

Most answers to this question use expensive operations like continuous insertions and deletions of items in an array, or copying arrays reiteratively.

Instead, this is the typical backtracking solution:

function permute(arr) {
  var results = [],
      l = arr.length,
      used = Array(l), // Array of bools. Keeps track of used items
      data = Array(l); // Stores items of the current permutation
  (function backtracking(pos) {
    if(pos == l) return results.push(data.slice());
    for(var i=0; i<l; ++i) if(!used[i]) { // Iterate unused items
      used[i] = true;      // Mark item as used
      data[pos] = arr[i];  // Assign item at the current position
      backtracking(pos+1); // Recursive call
      used[i] = false;     // Mark item as not used
    }
  })(0);
  return results;
}
permute([1,2,3,4]); // [  [1,2,3,4], [1,2,4,3], /* ... , */ [4,3,2,1]  ]

Since the results array will be huge, it might be a good idea to iterate the results one by one instead of allocating all the data simultaneously. In ES6, this can be done with generators:

function permute(arr) {
  var l = arr.length,
      used = Array(l),
      data = Array(l);
  return function* backtracking(pos) {
    if(pos == l) yield data.slice();
    else for(var i=0; i<l; ++i) if(!used[i]) {
      used[i] = true;
      data[pos] = arr[i];
      yield* backtracking(pos+1);
      used[i] = false;
    }
  }(0);
}
var p = permute([1,2,3,4]);
p.next(); // {value: [1,2,3,4], done: false}
p.next(); // {value: [1,2,4,3], done: false}
// ...
p.next(); // {value: [4,3,2,1], done: false}
p.next(); // {value: undefined, done: true}
5

Answer without the need for a exterior array or additional function

function permutator (arr) {
  var permutations = [];
  if (arr.length === 1) {
    return [ arr ];
  }

  for (var i = 0; i <  arr.length; i++) { 
    var subPerms = permutator(arr.slice(0, i).concat(arr.slice(i + 1)));
    for (var j = 0; j < subPerms.length; j++) {
      subPerms[j].unshift(arr[i]);
      permutations.push(subPerms[j]);
    }
  }
  return permutations;
}
5

Some version inspired from Haskell:

perms [] = [[]]
perms xs = [ x:ps | x <- xs , ps <- perms ( xs\\[x] ) ]

function perms(xs) {
  if (!xs.length) return [[]];
  return xs.flatMap((xi, i) => {
    // get permutations of xs without its i-th item, then prepend xi to each
    return perms([...xs.slice(0,i), ...xs.slice(i+1)]).map(xsi => [xi, ...xsi]);
  });
}
document.write(JSON.stringify(perms([1,2,3])));

4

This is an interesting task and and here is my contribution. It's very simple and fast. If interested please bear with me and read on.

If you would like to this job fast, you definitely have to get yourself into dynamical programming. Which means you should forget about recursive approaches. That's for sure...

OK le_m's code which uses the Heap's method seems to be the fastest so far. Well i haven't got a name for my algorithm, i don't know if it's already been implemented or not but it's very simple and fast. As with all dynamical programming approaches we will start with the simplest problem and go for the final result.

Assuming that we have an array of a = [1,2,3] we will start with

r = [[1]]; // result
t = [];    // interim result

Then follow these three steps;

  1. For each item of our r (result) array we will add the next item of the input array.
  2. We will rotate each item it's length many times and will store each instance at the interim result array t. (well except for the first one not to waste time with 0 rotation)
  3. Once we finish with all items of r the interim array t should hold the next level of results so we make r = t; t = []; and carry on up until the length of the input array a.

So the following are our steps;

r array   | push next item to |  get length many rotations
          |  each sub array   |       of each subarray
-----------------------------------------------------------
[[1]]     |     [[1,2]]       |     [[1,2],[2,1]]
----------|-------------------|----------------------------
[[1,2],   |     [[1,2,3],     |     [[1,2,3],[2,3,1],[3,1,2],
 [2,1]]   |      [2,1,3]]     |      [2,1,3],[1,3,2],[3,2,1]]
----------|-------------------|----------------------------
previous t|                   |
-----------------------------------------------------------

So here is the code

function perm(a){
  var r = [[a[0]]],
      t = [],
      s = [];
  if (a.length <= 1) return a;
  for (var i = 1, la = a.length; i < la; i++){
    for (var j = 0, lr = r.length; j < lr; j++){
      r[j].push(a[i]);
      t.push(r[j]);
      for(var k = 1, lrj = r[j].length; k < lrj; k++){
        for (var l = 0; l < lrj; l++) s[l] = r[j][(k+l)%lrj];
        t[t.length] = s;
        s = [];
      }
    }
    r = t;
    t = [];
  }
  return r;
}

var arr = [0,1,2,4,5];
console.log("The length of the permutation is:",perm(arr).length);
console.time("Permutation test");
for (var z = 0; z < 2000; z++) perm(arr);
console.timeEnd("Permutation test");

In multiple test i have seen it resolving the 120 permutations of [0,1,2,3,4] for 2000 times in 25~35ms.

  • 1
    It seems to run really fast, sometimes faster, sometimes slower than the Heap method on FF/Ubuntu for different length / warm-up iterations etc. Would need a jsperf to see results for different engines. – le_m Mar 27 '17 at 20:45
  • 1
    @le_m OK i have done some test @JSBen On Ubuntu & AMD CPU: With Chrome rotatePerm (the above one) is consistenly 1.2 faster. With FF there is no consistency. After multiple tests sometimes heapPerm is 2 times faster some times rotatePerm is 1.1 times faster. With other web-kit browsers such as Opera or Epiphany rotatePerm consistently turns out to be 1.1 times faster. However with Edge heapPerm is consistently 1.2 times faster every single time. – Redu Mar 28 '17 at 15:09
  • 1
    Nice! It seems that - at least on FF/Ubuntu - the performance of the heap method mainly depends on the performance of array copying. I modified your benchmark to compare slicing vs. pushing: jsben.ch/#/x7mYh - on FF and for small input arrays, pushing seems much faster – le_m Mar 28 '17 at 15:44
  • 2
    Would be great if the heap method could be beaten performance-wise. By the way, your method generates the same output as Langdon's algorithm (page 16) from the same 1977 paper I used as a reference for Heap's method: homepage.math.uiowa.edu/~goodman/22m150.dir/2007/… – le_m Mar 28 '17 at 16:19
  • 2
    @le_m I have just checked and it seems to be the same thing. I seem to do rotation like he implemented. Just with 40 years delay. As i have mentioned in my answer it's in fact a very simple method. Mentioned to be the choice only when fast rotation is available. Currently i am in to Haskell and it has a built in method to make a list (lets say array) cycle indefinitely (lazy evaluation makes an infinite repetition no problem) and this might come handy. Yet, Haskell already has a standard permutations function :) – Redu Mar 28 '17 at 16:44
2

Here is another "more recursive" solution.

function perms(input) {
  var data = input.slice();
  var permutations = [];
  var n = data.length;

  if (n === 0) {
    return [
      []
    ];
  } else {
    var first = data.shift();
    var words = perms(data);
    words.forEach(function(word) {
      for (var i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        var tmp = word.slice();
        tmp.splice(i, 0, first)
        permutations.push(tmp);
      }
    });
  }

  return permutations;
}

var str = 'ABC';
var chars = str.split('');
var result = perms(chars).map(function(p) {
  return p.join('');
});

console.log(result);

Output:

[ 'ABC', 'BAC', 'BCA', 'ACB', 'CAB', 'CBA' ]
2
   function perm(xs) {
       return xs.length === 0 ? [[]] : perm(xs.slice(1)).reduce(function (acc, ys) {
        for (var i = 0; i < xs.length; i++) {
          acc.push([].concat(ys.slice(0, i), xs[0], ys.slice(i)));
        }
        return acc;
      }, []);
    }

Test it with:

console.log(JSON.stringify(perm([1, 2, 3,4])));
2

Similar in spirit to the Haskell-style solution by @crl, but working with reduce:

function permutations( base ) {
  if (base.length == 0) return [[]]
  return permutations( base.slice(1) ).reduce( function(acc,perm) {
    return acc.concat( base.map( function(e,pos) {
      var new_perm = perm.slice()
      new_perm.splice(pos,0,base[0])
      return new_perm
    }))
  },[])    
}
2
#!/usr/bin/env node
"use strict";

function perm(arr) {
    if(arr.length<2) return [arr];
    var res = [];
    arr.forEach(function(x, i) {
        perm(arr.slice(0,i).concat(arr.slice(i+1))).forEach(function(a) {
            res.push([x].concat(a));
        });
    });
    return res;
}

console.log(perm([1,2,3,4]));
2

This is a very nice use-case for map/reduce:

function permutations(arr) {
    return (arr.length === 1) ? arr :
    arr.reduce((acc, cv, index) => {
        let remaining = [...arr];
        remaining.splice(index, 1);
        return acc.concat(permutations(remaining).map(a => [].concat(cv,a)));
    }, []);
}
  • First, we handle the base case and simply return the array if there is only on item in it
  • In all other cases
    • we create an empty array
    • loop over the input-array
    • and add an array of the current value and all permutations of the remaining array [].concat(cv,a)
2

Here is a minimal ES6 version. The flatten and without functions can be pulled from Lodash.

const flatten = xs =>
    xs.reduce((cum, next) => [...cum, ...next], []);

const without = (xs, x) =>
    xs.filter(y => y !== x);

const permutations = xs =>
    flatten(xs.map(x =>
        xs.length < 2
            ? [xs]
            : permutations(without(xs, x)).map(perm => [x, ...perm])
    ));

Result:

permutations([1,2,3])
// [[1, 2, 3], [1, 3, 2], [2, 1, 3], [2, 3, 1], [3, 1, 2], [3, 2, 1]]
1

Most of the other answers do not utilize the new javascript generator functions which is a perfect solution to this type of problem. You probably only need one permutation at time in memory. Also, I prefer to generate a permutation of a range of indices as this allows me to index each permutation and jump straight to any particular permutation as well as be used to permutate any other collection.

// ES6 generator version of python itertools [permutations and combinations]
const range = function*(l) { for (let i = 0; i < l; i+=1) yield i; }
const isEmpty = arr => arr.length === 0;

const permutations = function*(a) {
    const r = arguments[1] || [];
    if (isEmpty(a)) yield r;
    for (let i of range(a.length)) {
        const aa = [...a];
        const rr = [...r, ...aa.splice(i, 1)];
        yield* permutations(aa, rr);
    }
}
console.log('permutations of ABC');
console.log(JSON.stringify([...permutations([...'ABC'])]));

const combinations = function*(a, count) {
    const r = arguments[2] || [];
    if (count) {
        count = count - 1;
        for (let i of range(a.length - count)) {
            const aa = a.slice(i);
            const rr = [...r, ...aa.splice(0, 1)];
            yield* combinations(aa, count, rr);
        }
    } else {
        yield r;
    }
}
console.log('combinations of 2 of ABC');
console.log(JSON.stringify([...combinations([...'ABC'], 2)]));



const permutator = function() {
    const range = function*(args) {
        let {begin = 0, count} = args;
        for (let i = begin; count; count--, i+=1) {
            yield i;
        }
    }
    const factorial = fact => fact ? fact * factorial(fact - 1) : 1;

    return {
        perm: function(n, permutationId) {
            const indexCount = factorial(n);
            permutationId = ((permutationId%indexCount)+indexCount)%indexCount;

            let permutation = [0];
            for (const choiceCount of range({begin: 2, count: n-1})) {
                const choice = permutationId % choiceCount;
                const lastIndex = permutation.length;

                permutation.push(choice);
                permutation = permutation.map((cv, i, orig) => 
                    (cv < choice || i == lastIndex) ? cv : cv + 1
                );

                permutationId = Math.floor(permutationId / choiceCount);
            }
            return permutation.reverse();
        },
        perms: function*(n) {
            for (let i of range({count: factorial(n)})) {
                yield this.perm(n, i);
            }
        }
    };
}();

console.log('indexing type permutator');
let i = 0;
for (let elem of permutator.perms(3)) {
  console.log(`${i}: ${elem}`);
  i+=1;
}
console.log();
console.log(`3: ${permutator.perm(3,3)}`);

1
perm = x => x[0] ?  x.reduce((a, n) => (perm(x.filter(m => m!=n)).forEach(y => a.push([n,...y])), a), []): [[]]
  • 2
    Can you add an explanation please. – Mehdi Bounya Nov 5 '18 at 19:41
  • 3
    While this answer may solve the question, it contains no explanation of how or why it does so. – samlev Nov 5 '18 at 21:11
1

Quite late. Still just in case if this helps anyone.

function permute(arr) {
  if (arr.length == 1) return arr

  let res = arr.map((d, i) => permute([...arr.slice(0, i),...arr.slice(i + 1)])
                              .map(v => [d,v].join(''))).flat()

  return res
}

console.log(permute([1,2,3,4]))

1

Here's a cool solution

const rotations = ([l, ...ls], right=[]) =>
  l ? [[l, ...ls, ...right], ...rotations(ls, [...right, l])] : []

const permutations = ([x, ...xs]) =>
  x ? permutations(xs).flatMap((p) => rotations([x, ...p])) : [[]]
  
console.log(permutations("cat"))

0

I wrote a post to demonstrate how to permute an array in JavaScript. Here is the code which does this.

var count=0;
function permute(pre,cur){ 
    var len=cur.length;
    for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
        var p=clone(pre);
        var c=clone(cur);
        p.push(cur[i]);
        remove(c,cur[i]);
        if(len>1){
            permute(p,c);
        }else{
            print(p);
            count++;
        }
    }
}
function print(arr){
    var len=arr.length;
    for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
        document.write(arr[i]+" ");
    }
    document.write("<br />");
}
function remove(arr,item){
    if(contains(arr,item)){
        var len=arr.length;
        for(var i = len-1; i >= 0; i--){ // STEP 1
            if(arr[i] == item){             // STEP 2
                arr.splice(i,1);              // STEP 3
            }
        }
    }
}
function contains(arr,value){
    for(var i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
        if(arr[i]==value){
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
function clone(arr){
    var a=new Array();
    var len=arr.length;
    for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
        a.push(arr[i]);
    }
    return a;
}

Just call

permute([], [1,2,3,4])

will work. For details on how this works, please refer to the explanation in that post.

0
function nPr(xs, r) {
    if (!r) return [];
    return xs.reduce(function(memo, cur, i) {
        var others  = xs.slice(0,i).concat(xs.slice(i+1)),
            perms   = nPr(others, r-1),
            newElms = !perms.length ? [[cur]] :
                      perms.map(function(perm) { return [cur].concat(perm) });
        return memo.concat(newElms);
    }, []);
}
0

"use strict";
function getPermutations(arrP) {
    var results = [];
    var arr = arrP;
    arr.unshift(null);
    var length = arr.length;

    while (arr[0] === null) {

        results.push(arr.slice(1).join(''));

        let less = null;
        let lessIndex = null;

        for (let i = length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
            if(arr[i - 1] < arr[i]){
                less = arr[i - 1];
                lessIndex = i - 1;
                break;
            }
        }

        for (let i = length - 1; i > lessIndex; i--) {
            if(arr[i] > less){
                arr[lessIndex] = arr[i];
                arr[i] = less;
                break;
            }
        }

        for(let i = lessIndex + 1; i<length; i++){
           for(let j = i + 1; j < length; j++){
               if(arr[i] > arr[j] ){
                   arr[i] = arr[i] + arr[j];
                   arr[j] = arr[i] - arr[j];
                   arr[i] = arr[i] - arr[j];
               }
           }
        }
    }

    return results;
}

var res = getPermutations([1,2,3,4,5]);
var out = document.getElementById('myTxtArr');
res.forEach(function(i){ out.value+=i+', '});
textarea{
   height:500px;
  width:500px;
}
<textarea id='myTxtArr'></textarea>

Outputs lexicographically ordered permutations. Works only with numbers. In other case, you have to change the swap method on line 34.

0
  let permutations = []

  permutate([], {
    color: ['red', 'green'],
    size: ['big', 'small', 'medium'],
    type: ['saison', 'oldtimer']
  })

  function permutate (currentVals, remainingAttrs) {
    remainingAttrs[Object.keys(remainingAttrs)[0]].forEach(attrVal => {
      let currentValsNew = currentVals.slice(0)
      currentValsNew.push(attrVal)

      if (Object.keys(remainingAttrs).length > 1) {
        let remainingAttrsNew = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(remainingAttrs))
        delete remainingAttrsNew[Object.keys(remainingAttrs)[0]]

        permutate(currentValsNew, remainingAttrsNew)
      } else {
        permutations.push(currentValsNew)
      }
    })
  }

Result:

[ 
  [ 'red', 'big', 'saison' ],
  [ 'red', 'big', 'oldtimer' ],
  [ 'red', 'small', 'saison' ],
  [ 'red', 'small', 'oldtimer' ],
  [ 'red', 'medium', 'saison' ],
  [ 'red', 'medium', 'oldtimer' ],
  [ 'green', 'big', 'saison' ],
  [ 'green', 'big', 'oldtimer' ],
  [ 'green', 'small', 'saison' ],
  [ 'green', 'small', 'oldtimer' ],
  [ 'green', 'medium', 'saison' ],
  [ 'green', 'medium', 'oldtimer' ] 
]
0

My first contribution to the site. See here for some explanation drawings of the algorithm behind the code. Also, according to the tests that I have done, this code runs faster than all the other methods mentioned here before this date, of course it is minimal if there are few values, but the time increases exponentially when adding too many.

function permutations(arr) {
    var finalArr = [];
    function iterator(arrayTaken, tree) {
        var temp;
        for (var i = 0; i < tree; i++) {
            temp = arrayTaken.slice();
            temp.splice(tree - 1 - i, 0, temp.splice(tree - 1, 1)[0]);
            if (tree >= arr.length) {
                finalArr.push(temp);
            } else {
                iterator(temp, tree + 1);
            }
        }
    }
    iterator(arr, 1);
    return finalArr;
};
0
const removeItem = (arr, i) => {
  return arr.slice(0, i).concat(arr.slice(i+1));
}

const makePermutations = (strArr) => {
  const doPermutation = (strArr, pairArr) => {
    return strArr.reduce((result, permutItem, i) => {
      const currentPair = removeItem(pairArr, i);
      const tempResult = currentPair.map((item) => permutItem+item);
      return tempResult.length === 1 ? result.concat(tempResult) :
             result.concat(doPermutation(tempResult, currentPair));
    }, []);
  }
  return strArr.length === 1 ? strArr :
         doPermutation(strArr, strArr);
}


makePermutations(["a", "b", "c", "d"]);
//result: ["abcd", "abdc", "acbd", "acdb", "adbc", "adcb", "bacd", "badc", "bcad", "bcda", "bdac", "bdca", "cabd", "cadb", "cbad", "cbda", "cdab", "cdba", "dabc", "dacb", "dbac", "dbca", "dcab", "dcba"]
0

const permutations = array => {
  let permut = [];
  helperFunction(0, array, permut);
  return permut;
};

const helperFunction = (i, array, permut) => {
  if (i === array.length - 1) {
    permut.push(array.slice());
  } else {
    for (let j = i; j < array.length; j++) {
      swapElements(i, j, array);
      helperFunction(i + 1, array, permut);
      swapElements(i, j, array);
    }
  }
};

function swapElements(a, b, array) {
  let temp = array[a];
  array[a] = array[b];
  array[b] = temp;
}

console.log(permutations([1, 2, 3]));

0

I had a crack at making a version of this that attempts to be concise yet readable, and purely functional programming.

function stringPermutations ([...input]) {
  if (input.length === 1) return input;

  return input
    .map((thisChar, index) => {
      const remainingChars = [...input.slice(0, index), ...input.slice(index + 1)];
      return stringPermutations(remainingChars)
        .map(remainder => thisChar + remainder);
    })
    .reduce((acc, cur) => [...acc, ...cur]);
}

Note that the argument formatting turns an input string into an array. Not sure if that's a bit too magical.. Not sure I've seen it in the wild. For real readability I'd probably instead do input = [...input] for the first line of the function.

0

This is an implementation of Heap's algorithm (similar to @le_m's), except it's recursive.

function permute_kingzee(arr,n=arr.length,out=[]) {
    if(n == 1) {
        return out.push(arr.slice());
    } else {
        for(let i=0; i<n; i++) {
            permute_kingzee(arr,n-1, out);
            let j = ( n % 2 == 0 ) ? i : 0;
            let t = arr[n-1];
            arr[n-1] = arr[j];
            arr[j] = t;
        }
        return out;
    }
}

It looks like it's quite faster too : https://jsfiddle.net/3brqzaLe/

0

Here's one I made...

const permute = (ar) =>
  ar.length === 1 ? ar : ar.reduce( (ac,_,i) =>
    {permute([...ar.slice(0,i),...ar.slice(i+1)]).map(v=>ac.push([].concat(ar[i],v))); return ac;},[]);

And here it is again but written less tersely!...

function permute(inputArray) {
  if (inputArray.length === 1) return inputArray;
  return inputArray.reduce( function(accumulator,_,index){
    permute([...inputArray.slice(0,index),...inputArray.slice(index+1)])
      .map(value=>accumulator.push([].concat(inputArray[index],value)));
    return accumulator;
  },[]);
}

How it works: If the array is longer than one element it steps through each element and concatenates it with a recursive call to itself with the remaining elements as it's argument. It doesn't mutate the original array.

protected by Jack Bashford May 18 at 22:03

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