231

I have a file called diff.txt. I Want to check whether it is empty.

I wrote a bash script something like below, but I couldn't get it work.

if [ -s diff.txt ]
then
        touch empty.txt
        rm full.txt
else
        touch full.txt
        rm emtpy.txt
fi
4
  • 33
    [ -s FILE ] True if FILE exists and has a size greater than zero. Thus, you get "empty.txt" if "diff.txt" is not empty. – Matthias Apr 1 '12 at 13:48
  • 2
    PS: If you want to check an actual diff call, just check the return value: if diff foo.txt bar.txt; then echo 'No difference' – l0b0 Apr 2 '12 at 13:13
  • 28
    Test can be negated: if [ ! -s diff.txt ]; then echo "IS EMPTY";else echo "HAS SOMETHING";fi – David Ramirez Jun 13 '14 at 20:44
  • Beware of the trailing new-line characters. Check the file out with $ cat diff.txt | hexdump -C – Alejandro Blasco Feb 20 '18 at 15:18

10 Answers 10

276

Misspellings are irritating, aren't they? Check your spelling of empty, but then also try this:

#!/bin/bash -e

if [ -s diff.txt ]
then
        rm -f empty.txt
        touch full.txt
else
        rm -f full.txt
        touch empty.txt
fi

I like shell scripting a lot, but one disadvantage of it is that the shell cannot help you when you misspell, whereas a compiler like your C++ compiler can help you.

Notice incidentally that I have swapped the roles of empty.txt and full.txt, as @Matthias suggests.

10
  • 9
    The shell can help with misspellings. empty=empty.txt; full=full.txt; diff=diff.txt; if [ -s ${diff?} ]; then r=${empty?} t=${full?}; else r=${full?} t=${empty?}; fi; rm ${r?}; touch ${t?} – William Pursell Sep 13 '16 at 15:31
  • 2
    Using the tool shellcheck can find spelling errors just fine. – Yokai Oct 3 '16 at 3:30
  • 1
    Surely this will fail if the file does not exist either? This is supposed to be a check if the file is empty only. – geedoubleya Oct 5 '17 at 11:31
  • @geedoubleya: Sure. That's a reasonable point. If the file's existence were relevant (as, of course, it might be), then one might adjust the script accordingly. If you gave the adjusted script as an answer and pinged me, I'd upvote. – thb Oct 10 '17 at 15:08
  • 2
    You can also set -u – Jon McClung Aug 20 '19 at 19:54
87
[ -s file.name ] || echo "file is empty"
3
  • 12
    [[ -s file.name ]] && echo "full" || echo "empty" – McPeppr Jan 29 '18 at 20:27
  • 1
    [[ -s file.name ]] || { [[ -f file.name ]] && echo 'empty' || echo 'does not exist'; } – smarber Apr 11 '18 at 10:42
  • @smarber for simple check like this, please use [ ... ] instead of [[ ... ]]. The latter is bashism, which should be used only for incompatible bash checks (e.g. regexp). If you ever happen to write anything which should be POSIX shell portable (e.g. Debian system scripts), you'll appreciate this habit yourself :). – pevik May 19 at 10:00
66

[ -s file ] # Checks if file has size greater than 0

[ -s diff.txt ] && echo "file has something" || echo "file is empty"

If needed, this checks all the *.txt files in the current directory; and reports all the empty file:

for file in *.txt; do if [ ! -s $file ]; then echo $file; fi; done
2
  • 3
    You don't need to do $(ls *.txt, and in fact shouldn't. Some people have defaults set for ls that use the long format (like me) and the shell will already expand *.txt on its own. Just do for file in *.txt instead. – Lilith Jun 26 '18 at 17:19
  • Nice! If you'd like to check all txt files recursively, you can use find like this: for file in $(find . -name '*.txt'); do if [[ ! -s $file ]]; then echo $file; fi; done – KlimczakM Nov 8 '18 at 7:28
13

While the other answers are correct, using the "-s" option will also show the file is empty even if the file does not exist.
By adding this additional check "-f" to see if the file exists first, we ensure the result is correct.

if [ -f diff.txt ]
then
  if [ -s diff.txt ]
  then
    rm -f empty.txt
    touch full.txt
  else
    rm -f full.txt
    touch empty.txt
  fi
else
  echo "File diff.txt does not exist"
fi
1
11

To check if file is empty or has only white spaces, you can use grep:

if [[ -z $(grep '[^[:space:]]' $filename) ]] ; then
  echo "Empty file" 
  ...
fi
1
  • 1
    This is the only good answer and should be the accepted one. Using -s does not answer the question. It looks for a file that does exist and has a size of more than 0 bytes. – Akito May 21 '20 at 11:36
8

@geedoubleya answer is my favorite.

However, I do prefer this

if [[ -f diff.txt && -s diff.txt ]]
then
  rm -f empty.txt
  touch full.txt
elif [[ -f diff.txt && ! -s diff.txt ]]
then
  rm -f full.txt
  touch empty.txt
else
  echo "File diff.txt does not exist"
fi
7

Easiest way for checking if file is empty or not:

if [ -s /path-to-file/filename.txt ]
then
     echo "File is not empty"
else
     echo "File is empty"
fi

You can also write it on single line:

[ -s /path-to-file/filename.txt ] && echo "File is not empty" || echo "File is empty"
2
[[ -f filename && ! -s filename ]] && echo "filename exists and is empty"
2

Many of the answers are correct but I feel like they could be more complete / simplistic etc. for example :

Example 1 : Basic if statement

# BASH4+ example on Linux :

typeset read_file="/tmp/some-file.txt"
if [ ! -s "${read_file}" ]  || [ ! -f "${read_file}" ] ;then
    echo "Error: file (${read_file}) not found.. "
    exit 7
fi

if $read_file is empty or not there stop the show with exit. More than once I have had misread the top answer here to mean the opposite.

Example 2 : As a function

# -- Check if file is missing /or empty --
# Globals: None
# Arguments: file name
# Returns: Bool
# --
is_file_empty_or_missing() {
    [[ ! -f "${1}" || ! -s "${1}" ]] && return 0 || return 1
}
0

I came here looking for how to delete empty __init__.py files as they are implicit in Python 3.3+ and ended up using:

find -depth '(' -type f  -name __init__.py ')' -print0 |
  while IFS= read -d '' -r file; do if [[ ! -s $file ]]; then rm $file; fi; done

Also (at least in zsh) using $path as the variable also breaks your $PATH env and so it'll break your open shell. Anyway, thought I'd share!

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