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I read the Calculate Bounding box coordinates from a rotated rectangle to know how to calculate bounding box coordinates from a rotated rectangle. But in a special case as follow image:

http://i.stack.imgur.com/3UNfD.png

How to get the rotated rectangle size if had get the bounding box size, coordinates and rotate degree?

I try write code in javascript

//assume w=123,h=98,deg=35 and get calculate box size
var deg = 35;
var bw = 156.9661922099485;
var bh = 150.82680201149986;

//calculate w and h
var xMax = bw / 2;
var yMax = bh / 2;
var radian = (deg / 180) * Math.PI;
var cosine = Math.cos(radian);
var sine = Math.sin(radian);
var cx = (xMax * cosine) + (yMax * sine)   / (cosine * cosine + sine * sine);
var cy =  -(-(xMax * sine)  - (yMax * cosine) / (cosine * cosine + sine * sine));
var w = (cx * 2 - bw)*2;
var h = (cy * 2 - bh)*2;

But...the answer is not match w and h

  • Do you have theta? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 2 '12 at 5:21
  • what do you mean by "rectangle size"? if you rotate an object, you will obtain, well, the same object rotated... same lengths, same area ... if you have the result of the rotation and not the original object, just use the coordinates (you say you have them), computing distances between the "corner points" to get the length of each side. – ShinTakezou Apr 2 '12 at 5:26
  • I'm assuming, with reference to your "Case Image", that you have bh, bw and theta, and you want w and h? – Li-aung Yip Apr 2 '12 at 5:31
  • @Li-aung Yip Yes,you got me! – Liao San Kai Apr 2 '12 at 5:39
  • I think your Javascript code is nearly correct, but you're off by a few plus/minus signs. See my answer. – Li-aung Yip Apr 2 '12 at 8:51
42

enter image description here

Solution

Given bounding box dimensions bx by by and t being the anticlockwise rotation of rectangle sized x by y:

x = (1/(cos(t)^2-sin(t)^2)) * (  bx * cos(t) - by * sin(t))
y = (1/(cos(t)^2-sin(t)^2)) * (- bx * sin(t) + by * cos(t))

Derivation

Why is this?

First, consider that the length bx is cut in two pieces, a and b, by the corner of the rectangle. Use trigonometry to express bx in terms of x, y, and theta:

bx = b          + a
bx = x * cos(t) + y * sin(t)            [1]

and similarly for by:

by = c          + d
by = x * sin(t) + y * cos(t)            [2]

1 and 2 can be expressed in matrix form as:

[ bx ] = [ cos(t)  sin(t) ] * [ x ]     [3]
[ by ]   [ sin(t)  cos(t) ]   [ y ]

Note that the matrix is nearly a rotation matrix (but not quite - it's off by a minus sign.)

Left-divide the matrix on both sides, giving:

[ x ] = inverse ( [ cos(t)  sin(t) ]    * [ bx ]                        [4]
[ y ]             [ sin(t)  cos(t) ] )    [ by ]

The matrix inverse is easy to evaluate for a 2x2 matrix and expands to:

[ x ] = (1/(cos(t)^2-sin(t)^2)) * [ cos(t) -sin(t) ] * [ bx ]           [5]
[ y ]                             [-sin(t)  cos(t) ]   [ by ]

[5] gives the two formulas:

x = (1/(cos(t)^2-sin(t)^2)) * (  bx * cos(t) - by * sin(t))             [6]
y = (1/(cos(t)^2-sin(t)^2)) * (- bx * sin(t) + by * cos(t))

Easy as pie!

  • And this is what five years of university-level mathematics teaches you how to do. :P – Li-aung Yip Apr 2 '12 at 7:58
  • +1: Li-aung Yip: you put me to shame with the amount of time and effort you have put into this answer. – High Performance Mark Apr 2 '12 at 10:34
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    @HighPerformanceMark: Time and effort spent answering questions is proportional to how interesting the question is. This one nerd sniped me. ;) – Li-aung Yip Apr 2 '12 at 11:56
  • @Li-aungYip:thank you for your kind generosity! – Liao San Kai Apr 2 '12 at 23:36
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    @anna.mi for 45º, there is no inverse matrix. See mathsisfun.com/algebra/matrix-inverse.html - The Inverse May Not Exist. I would assume that you'd have to use the affine transformation method mentioned below. – Marius Aug 19 '15 at 6:15
-1

You'll probably need something like affine transformation to discover point coordinates. And then using standard geometry formulas calculate the size.

  • An affine transformation is a very general case of rotation. In this case only simple trigonometry is required. ;) – Li-aung Yip Apr 2 '12 at 7:56
  • Though knowing about affine wouldn't hurt :) – Dmitry Reznik Apr 2 '12 at 17:38
  • How would we apply the affine transportation to this particular instance? Could you please provide an example? – Shotgun Ninja Apr 16 at 14:24

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