15

I am writing code for implementing a simple i2c read/write function using the general linux i2c driver linux/i2c-dev.h

I am confused about the ioctl : I2C_SLAVE

The kernel documentation states as follows :

You can do plain i2c transactions by using read(2) and write(2) calls. You do not need to pass the address byte; instead, set it through ioctl I2C_SLAVE before you try to access the device

However I am using the ioctl I2C_RDWR where I again set the slave address using i2c_msg.addr.

The kernel documentation also mentions the following :

Some ioctl() calls are for administrative tasks and are handled by i2c-dev directly. Examples include I2C_SLAVE

So is it must to use the ioctl I2C_SLAVE? If so do I need to set it just once or every time I perform a read and write?

If I had an i2c device I could have just tested the code on the device and would not have bothered you guys but unfortunately I don't have one right now.

Thanks for the help.

21

There are three major methods of communicating with i2c devices from userspace.

1. IOCTL I2C_RDWR

This method allows for simultaneous read/write and sending an uninterrupted sequence of message. Not all i2c devices support this method.

Before performing i/o with this method, you should check whether the device supports this method using an ioctl I2C_FUNCS operation.

Using this method, you do not need to perform an ioctl I2C_SLAVE operation -- it is done behind the scenes using the information embedded in the messages.

2. IOCTL SMBUS

This method of i/o is more powerful but the resulting code is more verbose. This method can be used if the device does not support the I2C_RDWR method.

Using this method, you do need to perform an ioctl I2C_SLAVE operation (or, if the device is busy, an I2C_SLAVE_FORCE operation).

3. SYSFS I/O

This method uses the basic file i/o system calls read() and write(). Uninterrupted sequential operations are not possible using this method. This method can be used if the device does not support the I2C_RDWR method.

Using this method, you do need to perform an ioctl I2C_SLAVE operation (or, if the device is busy, an I2C_SLAVE_FORCE operation).

I can't think of any situation when this method would be preferable to others, unless you need the chip to be treated like a file.


Full IOCTL Example

I haven't tested this example, but it shows the conceptual flow of writing to an i2c device.-- automatically detecting whether to use the ioctl I2C_RDWR or smbus technique.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>

#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#include <linux/i2c.h>
#include <linux/i2c-dev.h>
#include <sys/ioctl.h>

#define I2C_ADAPTER "/dev/i2c-0"
#define I2C_DEVICE  0x00

int i2c_ioctl_write (int fd, uint8_t dev, uint8_t regaddr, uint16_t *data, size_t size)
{
    int i, j = 0;
    int ret;
    uint8_t *buf;
    // the extra byte is for the regaddr
    size_t buff_size = 1 + size;

    buf = malloc(buff_size);
    if (buf == NULL) {
        return -ENOMEM;
    }

    buf[j ++] = regaddr;
    for (i = 0; i < size / sizeof(uint16_t); i ++) {
        buf[j ++] = (data[i] & 0xff00) >> 8;
        buf[j ++] = data[i] & 0xff;
    }

    struct i2c_msg messages[] = {
        {
            .addr = dev,
            .buf = buf,
            .len = buff_size,
        },
    };

    struct i2c_rdwr_ioctl_data payload = {
        .msgs = messages,
        .nmsgs = sizeof(messages) / sizeof(messages[0]),
    };

    ret = ioctl(fd, I2C_RDWR, &payload);
    if (ret < 0) {
        ret = -errno;
    }

    free (buf);
    return ret;
}

int i2c_ioctl_smbus_write (int fd, uint8_t dev, uint8_t regaddr, uint16_t *data, size_t size)
{
    int i, j = 0;
    int ret;
    uint8_t *buf;

    buf = malloc(size);
    if (buf == NULL) {
        return -ENOMEM;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < size / sizeof(uint16_t); i ++) {
        buf[j ++] = (data[i] & 0xff00) >> 8;
        buf[j ++] = data[i] & 0xff;
    }

    struct i2c_smbus_ioctl_data payload = {
        .read_write = I2C_SMBUS_WRITE,
        .size = I2C_SMBUS_WORD_DATA,
        .command = regaddr,
        .data = (void *) buf,
    };

    ret = ioctl (fd, I2C_SLAVE_FORCE, dev);
    if (ret < 0)
    {
        ret = -errno;
        goto exit;
    }

    ret = ioctl (fd, I2C_SMBUS, &payload);
    if (ret < 0)
    {
        ret = -errno;
        goto exit;
    }

exit:
    free(buf);
    return ret;
}

int i2c_write (int fd, uint8_t dev, uint8_t regaddr, uint16_t *data, size_t size)
{
    unsigned long funcs;

    if (ioctl(fd, I2C_FUNCS, &funcs) < 0) {
        return -errno;
    }

    if (funcs & I2C_FUNC_I2C) {
        return i2c_ioctl_write (fd, dev, regaddr, data, size);
    } else if (funcs & I2C_FUNC_SMBUS_WORD_DATA) {
        return i2c_ioctl_smbus_write (fd, dev, regaddr, data, size);
    } else {
        return -ENOSYS;
    }
}

int parse_args (uint8_t *regaddr, uint16_t *data, size_t size, char *argv[])
{
    char *endptr;
    int i;

    *regaddr = (uint8_t) strtol(argv[1], &endptr, 0);
    if (errno || endptr == argv[1]) {
        return -1;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < size / sizeof(uint16_t); i ++) {
        data[i] = (uint16_t) strtol(argv[i + 2], &endptr, 0);
        if (errno || endptr == argv[i + 2]) {
            return -1;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

void usage (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s regaddr data [data]*\n", argv[0]);
    fprintf(stderr, "  regaddr   The 8-bit register address to write to.\n");
    fprintf(stderr, "  data      The 16-bit data to be written.\n");
    exit(-1);
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    uint8_t regaddr;
    uint16_t *data;
    size_t size;
    int fd;
    int ret = 0;

    if (argc < 3) {
        usage(argc, argv);
    }

    size = (argc - 2) * sizeof(uint16_t);
    data = malloc(size);
    if (data == NULL) {
        fprintf (stderr, "%s.\n", strerror(ENOMEM));
        return -ENOMEM;
    }

    if (parse_args(&regaddr, data, size, argv) != 0) {
        free(data);
        usage(argc, argv);
    }

    fd = open(I2C_ADAPTER, O_RDWR | O_NONBLOCK);
    ret = i2c_write(fd, I2C_DEVICE, regaddr, data);
    close(fd);

    if (ret) {
        fprintf (stderr, "%s.\n", strerror(-ret));
    }

    free(data);

    return ret;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Example code uses sizeof(data) when data is a pointer, which always returns sizeof pointer (4 or 8 on common OSes). You need to pass size of data, can't use sizeof like this! – hyde Nov 16 '17 at 8:05
  • Could you please add execution sample command?.. That will be more helpfull. – Ashok Reddy Apr 19 '18 at 13:32
  • @hyde (much delayed, but...) you're right. i've updated the code sample to remove this bug. – Woodrow Barlow Jul 12 '18 at 14:16
  • @Naresh ./program 0xD 0x1337 0xdead 0xbeef (see also the usage function) – Woodrow Barlow Jul 12 '18 at 14:18
2

I'm not too sure if this helps because I don't use ioctl I2C_RDWR but I've been using the following code with success:

int fd;
fd = open("/dev/i2c-5", O_RDWR);
ioctl(fd, I2C_SLAVE_FORCE, 0x20);
i2c_smbus_write_word_data(fd, ___, ___);
i2c_smbus_read_word_data(fd, ___);

All I do is set I2C_SLAVE_FORCE once at the beginning and I can read and write as much as I want to after that.

PS - This is just a code sample and obviously you should check the returns of all of these functions. I'm using this code to communicate with a digital I/O chip. The two i2c_* functions are just wrappers that call ioctl(fd, I2C_SMBUS, &args); where args is a struct i2c_smbus_ioctl_data type.

| improve this answer | |
  • Why is I2C_SLAVE_FORCE working and not I2C_SLAVE (in the case where it's the first time we use the driver) ? – AwaX Nov 25 '16 at 15:02
  • 2
    It's been a while since I've worked on I2C code but the program that I was working one was a userland program for a custom embedded board. I'm guessing that a driver was already attached to the device and that's why I was using _FORCE. – Kristina Dec 4 '16 at 3:56
1

If you use the read() and write() methods, calling ioctl with I2C_SLAVE once is enough. You can also use I2C_SLAVE_FORCE if the device is already in use.

However I haven't yet found a consistent way to read specific registers for every device using the read()/write() methods.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanx for the info,but like i mentioned i am using I2C_RDWR ioctl,so do i need to use I2C_SLAVE ioctl? – zacurry Apr 3 '12 at 7:26
0

For the interested, SLAVE_FORCE is used when the device in question is already being managed by a kernel driver. (i2cdetect will show UU for that address)

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.