I have a git repository hosted on github. Many of the files were initially developed on Windows, and I wasn't too careful about line endings. When I performed the initial commit, I also didn't have any git configuration in place to enforce correct line endings. The upshot is that I have a number of files with CRLF line endings in my github repository.

I'm now developing partially on Linux, and I'd like to clean up the line endings. How can I ensure the files are stored correctly with LF on github, and have LF in my working copy?

I've set up a .gitattributes file containing text eol=LF; is that correct? With that committed and pushed, can I just rm my local repo and re-clone from github to get the desired effect?

  • 1
    possible duplicate of git replacing LF with CRLF – Lazy Badger Apr 2 '12 at 13:19
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  • Neither of those is quite what I'm asking. I'm the only developer, and I'm quite willing to set up all my machines the same. I have an existing repo with some CRLF files already committed to it, and a couple of clones on different machines. How can I update the repo, and each working copy, so that there are LF everywhere? – Chowlett Apr 2 '12 at 13:23
  • Have you looked this Github guide? – Andy Apr 2 '12 at 13:36
  • @Andy - ah, that looks like it might be what I need. I'll give it a go later. – Chowlett Apr 2 '12 at 13:40
up vote 185 down vote accepted

Without a bit of information about what files are in your repository (pure source code, images, executables, ...), it's a bit hard to answer the question :)

Beside this, I'll consider that you're willing to default to LF as line endings in your working directory because you're willing to make sure that text files have LF line endings in your .git repository wether you work on Windows or Linux. Indeed better safe than sorry....

However, there's a better alternative: Benefit from LF line endings in your Linux workdir, CRLF line endings in your Windows workdir AND LF line endings in your repository.

As you're partially working on Linux and Windows, make sure core.eol is set to native and core.autocrlf is set to true.

Then, replace the content of your .gitattributes file with the following

* text=auto

This will let Git handle the automagic line endings conversion for you, on commits and checkouts. Binary files won't be altered, files detected as being text files will see the line endings converted on the fly.

However, as you know the content of your repository, you may give Git a hand and help him detect text files from binary files.

Provided you work on a C based image processing project, replace the content of your .gitattributes file with the following

* text=auto
*.txt text
*.c text
*.h text
*.jpg binary

This will make sure files which extension is c, h, or txt will be stored with LF line endings in your repo and will have native line endings in the working directory. Jpeg files won't be touched. All of the others will be benefit from the same automagic filtering as seen above.

In order to get a get a deeper understanding of the inner details of all this, I'd suggest you to dive into this very good post "Mind the end of your line" from Tim Clem, a Githubber.

As a real world example, you can also peek at this commit where those changes to a .gitattributes file are demonstrated.

UPDATE to the answer considering the following comment

I actually don't want CRLF in my Windows directories, because my Linux environment is actually a VirtualBox sharing the Windows directory

Makes sense. Thanks for the clarification. In this specific context, the .gitattributes file by itself won't be enough.

Run the following commands against your repository

$ git config core.eol lf
$ git config core.autocrlf input

As your repository is shared between your Linux and Windows environment, this will update the local config file for both environment. core.eol will make sure text files bear LF line endings on checkouts. core.autocrlf will ensure potential CRLF in text files (resulting from a copy/paste operation for instance) will be converted to LF in your repository.

Optionally, you can help Git distinguish what is a text file by creating a .gitattributes file containing something similar to the following:

# Autodetect text files
* text=auto

# ...Unless the name matches the following
# overriding patterns

# Definitively text files 
*.txt text
*.c text
*.h text

# Ensure those won't be messed up with
*.jpg binary
*.data binary

If you decided to create a .gitattributes file, commit it.

Lastly, ensure git status mentions "nothing to commit (working directory clean)", then perform the following operation

$ git checkout-index --force --all

This will recreate your files in your working directory, taking into account your config changes and the .gitattributes file and replacing any potential overlooked CRLF in your text files.

Once this is done, every text file in your working directory WILL bear LF line endings and git status should still consider the workdir as clean.

  • 19
    I actually don't want CRLF in my Windows directories, because my Linux environment is actually a VirtualBox sharing the Windows directory; and while Notepad++ etc. can handle LF-only on Windows, vi is less happy with CRLF. Do I just want to change it so that core.autocrlf is false (or input)? – Chowlett Apr 3 '12 at 7:52
  • 4
    Excellent answer. A quick note for anyone else using this setup: The line "* text=auto" should be the first line in your .gitattributes file so that subsequent lines can override that setting. – Ari Patrick Oct 7 '12 at 16:52
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    @CMCDragonkai Depending on your shell, git checkout-index --force --all may work better. The second point looks a bit off topic regarding the original question. How about asking a dedicated question? – nulltoken Nov 19 '13 at 20:22
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    I don't understand why .gitattributes can't handle the case of sharing a working copy between Linux and Windows. Can we not set text and eol=lf to achieve the same result as described in your answer via core.eol and core.autocrlf? – DanielSank Dec 10 '14 at 0:05
  • 4
    git checkout-index --force --all does nothing for me. What works is the list of commands in the GitHub instructions for dealing with this issue. – Roman Starkov Jul 5 '16 at 11:51

Starting with git 2.10, it is not necessary to enumerate each text file separately. Git 2.10 fixed the behavior of text=auto together with eol=lf. Source.

.gitattributes file in the root of your git repository:

* text=auto eol=lf

Add and commit it.

Afterwards, you can do following to steps and all files are normalized now:

git rm --cached -r .  # Remove every file from git's index.
git reset --hard      # Rewrite git's index to pick up all the new line endings.

Source: Answer by kenorb.

  • 3
    Git 2.10 has been released on 3rd September 2016. – stil Oct 23 '17 at 11:01

To force LF line endings for all text files, you can create .gitattributes file in top-level of your repository with the following lines (change as desired):

# Ensure all C and PHP files use LF.
*.c         eol=lf
*.php       eol=lf

which ensures that all files that Git considers to be text files have normalized (LF) line endings in the repository (normally core.eol configuration controls which one do you have by default).

Based on the new attribute settings, any text files containing CRLFs should be normalized by Git. If this won't happen automatically, you can refresh a repository manually after changing line endings, so you can re-scan and commit the working directory by the following steps (given clean working directory):

$ echo "* text=auto" >> .gitattributes
$ rm .git/index     # Remove the index to force Git to
$ git reset         # re-scan the working directory
$ git status        # Show files that will be normalized
$ git add -u
$ git add .gitattributes
$ git commit -m "Introduce end-of-line normalization"

or as per GitHub docs:

git add . -u
git commit -m "Saving files before refreshing line endings"
git rm --cached -r . # Remove every file from Git's index.
git reset --hard # Rewrite the Git index to pick up all the new line endings.
git add . # Add all your changed files back, and prepare them for a commit.
git commit -m "Normalize all the line endings" # Commit the changes to your repository.

See also: @Charles Bailey post.

In addition, if you would like to exclude any files to not being treated as a text, unset their text attribute, e.g.

manual.pdf      -text

Or mark it explicitly as binary:

# Denote all files that are truly binary and should not be modified.
*.png binary
*.jpg binary

To see some more advanced git normalization file, check .gitattributes at Drupal core:

# Drupal git normalization
# @see https://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/gitattributes.html
# @see https://www.drupal.org/node/1542048

# Normally these settings would be done with macro attributes for improved
# readability and easier maintenance. However macros can only be defined at the
# repository root directory. Drupal avoids making any assumptions about where it
# is installed.

# Define text file attributes.
# - Treat them as text.
# - Ensure no CRLF line-endings, neither on checkout nor on checkin.
# - Detect whitespace errors.
#   - Exposed by default in `git diff --color` on the CLI.
#   - Validate with `git diff --check`.
#   - Deny applying with `git apply --whitespace=error-all`.
#   - Fix automatically with `git apply --whitespace=fix`.

*.config  text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.css     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.dist    text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.engine  text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.html    text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=html
*.inc     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.install text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.js      text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.json    text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.lock    text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.map     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.md      text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.module  text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.php     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.po      text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.profile text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.script  text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.sh      text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.sql     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.svg     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.theme   text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2 diff=php
*.twig    text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.txt     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.xml     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2
*.yml     text eol=lf whitespace=blank-at-eol,-blank-at-eof,-space-before-tab,tab-in-indent,tabwidth=2

# Define binary file attributes.
# - Do not treat them as text.
# - Include binary diff in patches instead of "binary files differ."
*.eot     -text diff
*.exe     -text diff
*.gif     -text diff
*.gz      -text diff
*.ico     -text diff
*.jpeg    -text diff
*.jpg     -text diff
*.otf     -text diff
*.phar    -text diff
*.png     -text diff
*.svgz    -text diff
*.ttf     -text diff
*.woff    -text diff
*.woff2   -text diff

See also:

  • 2
    1. text=auto is misleading. You can't use text=auto and eol together. Setting eol disables automatic detection of text files. This is why you have to specify all those file types. If auto was enabled, you wouldn't need all of that. 2. You don't need text and eol=lf. eol=lf effectively sets text. – Ben Jan 31 '16 at 19:08
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    2nd what @Ben said, this config is currently wrong and dangerous if you don't explicitly mark all binary files. – Michael R May 16 '16 at 21:51
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    I've read that * text=auto eol=lf the first text=auto is overridden by eol=lf. Where did you find this feature? Here's my source: stackoverflow.com/questions/29435156/… – CMCDragonkai Jun 26 '16 at 13:59
  • Removed * text=auto eol=lf from the example, since it was removed from Drupal as well. Consider removing comments as well. – kenorb Jul 28 '16 at 9:25

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