76

I'm trying to make a function that takes a character, then returns a pointer to a function depending on what the character was. I just am not sure how to make a function return a pointer to a function.

2
  • Will the signature of the returned function always be the same?
    – sean e
    Commented Jun 15, 2009 at 19:12
  • Here's the signature of a function that takes a function pointer and returns one: en.cppreference.com/w/c/program/signal Commented Nov 23, 2012 at 11:56

14 Answers 14

106
int f(char) {
    return 0;
}

int (*return_f())(char) {
    return f;
}

No, seriously, use a typedef :)

3
  • @Axalo The program compiles as is. return_f does not take any arguments but returns a function that takes a char.
    – erikkallen
    Commented Apr 24, 2015 at 9:21
  • 6
    Can you elaborate on "use a typedef"?
    – S.S. Anne
    Commented Mar 31, 2019 at 16:54
  • 2
    provide a shortcut typedef int (*ifc)(char); and use it as the return type in your function: ifc return_f();
    – Ralph
    Commented Aug 25, 2019 at 13:22
72
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int f1() {
    return 1;
}

int f2() {
    return 2;
}

typedef int (*fptr)();


fptr f( char c ) {
    if ( c == '1' ) {
        return f1;
    }
    else {
        return f2;
    }
}

int main() {
    char c = '1';
    fptr fp = f( c );
    cout << fp() << endl;
}
3
  • 2
    I am wondering why this works. Shouldn't we deference the function pointer first, i.e. cout << (*fp)() << endl; ?
    – qed
    Commented Mar 12, 2014 at 10:21
  • 4
    @qed: No. You can dereference it, but it's perfectly ok not to do it. Usual function are already pointer internally anyway.
    – xryl669
    Commented May 9, 2014 at 17:38
  • To @qed and anyone else who stumbles upon this and has the same question: I had a similar question. See the summary of the answer in the bottom of my question here: C++ Function call via an object with public member pointer to function, without using dereference operator. Whether you do myFuncPtr();, (*myFuncPtr)();, (**myFuncPtr)();, or even (**********************************f)();, it makes no difference. They are all valid function calls. Commented Feb 5, 2022 at 4:53
20

Create a typedef for the function signature:

typedef void (* FuncSig)(int param);

Then declare your function as returning FuncSig:

FuncSig GetFunction();
15

Assuming int f(char) and ret_f which returns &f.

C++98/C++03 compatible ways:

  • Ugly way:

    int (*ret_f()) (char) { return &f; }
    
  • With typedef:

    typedef int (sig)(char);
    
    sig* ret_f() { return &f; }
    

    or:

    typedef int (*sig_ptr)(char);
    
    sig_ptr ret_f() { return &f; }
    

Since C++11, in addition we have:

  • with decltype:

    decltype(&f) ret_f() { return &f; }
    
  • trailing return type:

    auto ret_f() -> int(*)(char) { return &f; }
    

    or:

    auto ret_f() -> decltype(&f) { return &f; }
    
  • typedef with using:

    using sig = int(char);
    
    sig* ret_f() { return &f; }
    

    or:

    using sig_ptr = int (*)(char);
    
    sig_ptr ret_f() { return &f; }
    

C++14 adds:

  • auto deduction:

    auto ret_f() { return &f; }
    
1
  • A "developers reference answer", clear and straight to the point! Commented Jun 10, 2020 at 5:01
10

In C++11 you can use trailing return types to simplify the syntax, e.g. assuming a function:

int c(int d) { return d * 2; }

This can be returned from a function (that takes a double to show that):

int (*foo(double e))(int)
{
    e;
    return c;
}

Using a trailing return type, this becomes a bit easier to read:

auto foo2(double e) -> int(*)(int)
{
    e;
    return c;
}
1
  • Thank you so much. Super helpful!
    – Sami
    Commented Jul 22, 2020 at 21:01
6

Here is how to do it without using a typedef:

int c(){ return 0; }

int (* foo (void))(){  //compiles
return c;
}
5

Syntax for returning the function:

return_type_of_returning_function (*function_name_which_returns_function)(actual_function_parameters) (returning_function_parameters)

Eg: Consider the function that need to be returned as follows,

void* (iNeedToBeReturend)(double iNeedToBeReturend_par)
{
}

Now the iNeedToBeReturend function can be returned as

void* (*iAmGoingToReturn(int iAmGoingToReturn_par))(double)
{
   return iNeedToBeReturend;
}

I Felt very bad to learn this concept after 3 years of professional programming life.

Bonus for you waiting down for dereferencing function pointer.

C++ Interview questions

Example for function which returns the function pointer is dlopen in dynamic library in c++

4
typedef void (*voidFn)();

void foo()
{
}

voidFn goo(char c)
{
    if (c == 'f') {
        return foo;
    }
    else {
        //..
    }
    // ..
}
2

This is the code to show return of a function pointer. You need to define the "function signature" to return first:

int returnsOne() {
     return 1;
}

typedef int(*fp)();

fp returnsFPtoReturnsOne() {
    &returnsOne;
}

In your specific case:

fp getFunctionFor(char code) {
    switch (code) {
        case 'a': return &functionA;
        case 'b': return &functionB;
    }
    return NULL;
}
0
2

Check out this site - http://cdecl.org

Helps you convert english to C declarations and back!

Cool Stuff!

This link decodes the example in erikallen's answer. int (*return_f())(char)

0
1

Easiest way is to typedef the pointer-to-function type you want, and then use that

typedef void (*fnptr_t)(int, int);
fptr_t myfunc(char *) { ....
1

I prefer returning objects and call the operator(). This way your function can return an interface and all classes can inherit from this. That is, if you're using C++ and not C.

Then you can use the parametrized factor method to return the objects based on your input.

0

Something like this

#include <iostream>

typedef char (*fn_ptr_t)(char);

char a_fn(char c)
{
  return c + 1;
}

char b_fn(char c)
{
  return c + 2;
}

fn_ptr_t
return_function(char c)
{
  fn_ptr_t result = 0;

  switch (c)
 {
    case 'a':
      result = a_fn;
      break;
    case 'b':
      result = b_fn;
      break;
 }

 return result;
}

int
main()
{
  fn_ptr_t fn = return_function('a');

  std::cout << "a(l) = " << (fn)('l') << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
0

I'm assuming C here (no objects) :) :

// Type of function which takes a char and returns an int:
typedef int (*Func)(char a);

// An example of the function you're trying to return and which does something
// with char:
int exampleFunc(char a)
{
    return (int)(a + 42);
}

// The function returning the pointer to a function:
Func *returnAfunc(void)
{
    return exampleFunc;
}
0