0

My test string is contains New Lines.

Test<?TEST.
sdasdsadads
Test<?TEST.

Test<?TEST.

I want to check if the combination <? exists anywhere in the text. If so, my regex should fail.

Any ideas?

ASP.NET web page.\

<td>
                            <asp:TextBox ID="test" runat="server" Height="55px" TextMode="MultiLine"></asp:TextBox>
                            <asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="RegularExpressionValidator11" runat="server"
                                ControlToValidate="test" Display="Dynamic" ForeColor="Red"
                                ValidationGroup="Validations" ValidationExpression="^(?![\s\S]*<\?)" EnableClientScript="true"></asp:RegularExpressionValidator>
                        </td>
10
  • can you clarify the question and may be give some example?
    – Du D.
    Apr 2, 2012 at 16:03
  • Should it be case sensitive or not? Apr 2, 2012 at 16:05
  • 1
    RegEx can not do Not Match. It can only check Match Apr 2, 2012 at 16:05
  • 2
    @shiplu.mokadd.im: Of course regexes can do that. Unless you're using a regex engine that hasn't been updated since about 1970. Apr 2, 2012 at 16:08
  • 1
    "ASP.NET web page" in the text and "nsregularexpression" in the tags. What are you asking about? iOS, ASP.NET (i.e. server code), JavaScript (i.e. client code), something else? Apr 3, 2012 at 0:20

4 Answers 4

2

This is what negative lookahead assertions are for:

^(?!.*<\?)

matches only if <? doesn't occur anywhere in the string. You might want to add (?s) at the start if your text can contain newlines.

2
  • When text contains Newline characters how to form the Regex?, tired adding ?s at the start but not working in ASP.NET web page
    – sqlnewbie
    Apr 2, 2012 at 23:41
  • @sqlnewbie: It's (?s), not ?s. And if your regex engine is in fact JavaScript instead of .NET (which it is when you're doing the matching on the client side), then this doesn't work indeed. Instead, use the regex ^(?![\s\S]*<\?. Apr 3, 2012 at 5:48
1

You don't need to use regex to search for a specific word. Instead, just do a plain substring search for that specific word.

In Python, this would look like:

def string_contains_test (text):
    lowercase_text = text.lower()
    if 'test' in lowercase_text:
        return True
    else:
        return False

text_1 = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amur...."
text_2 = "This is a test."

string_contains_test ( text_1 ) # False.
string_contains_test ( text_2 ) # True.

Note that case folding (converting a string to upper or lowercase) is evil when done to a Unicode string. Don't do that.

1

Like this?

!Regex.IsMatch(testString, Regex.Escape("<?"))

Or even easier:

!testString.Contains("<?")

Using only a regex (this will work for newlines also):

^(?![\s\S]*<\?)
4
  • I have tried it but not working Akzen, with new lines, could u check it?
    – sqlnewbie
    Apr 3, 2012 at 0:33
  • I tested it using this .net regex tester: derekslager.com/blog/posts/2007/09/…
    – aKzenT
    Apr 3, 2012 at 0:37
  • Can you check your test input with the link above? it should use the same Regex engine as the .net framework. Maybe you can post some code from the ASP.net webpage where you are using the regex, to see if we spot an error.
    – aKzenT
    Apr 3, 2012 at 0:37
  • <td> <asp:TextBox ID="test" runat="server" Height="55px" TextMode="MultiLine"></asp:TextBox> <asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="RegularExpressionValidator11" runat="server" ControlToValidate="test" Display="Dynamic" ForeColor="Red" ValidationGroup="Validations" ValidationExpression="^(?![\s\S]*<\?)" EnableClientScript="true"></asp:RegularExpressionValidator> </td>
    – sqlnewbie
    Apr 3, 2012 at 0:40
0
^(?!.*(\b(these|are|bad|words)\b)).*$
1
  • Why do you recommend this approach over the other expressions previously submitted as answers? May 19, 2020 at 0:39

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