501

I have an ASP.NET Web API (version 4) REST service where I need to pass an array of integers.

Here is my action method:

public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories(int[] categoryIds){
// code to retrieve categories from database
}

And this is the URL that I have tried:

/Categories?categoryids=1,2,3,4
3
  • 1
    I was getting a "Can't bind multiple parameters to the request's content" error when using a querystring like "/Categories?categoryids=1&categoryids=2&categoryids=3". Hope this brings people here who were getting this same error.
    – Josh Noe
    Apr 1, 2014 at 18:33
  • 2
    @Josh Did you use [FromUri] though? public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories([FromUri] int[] categoryids){...}
    – MIWMIB
    Apr 14, 2015 at 4:41
  • 2
    @FrankGorman No, I wasn't, which was my issue.
    – Josh Noe
    Apr 14, 2015 at 19:49

17 Answers 17

712

You just need to add [FromUri] before parameter, looks like:

GetCategories([FromUri] int[] categoryIds)

And send request:

/Categories?categoryids=1&categoryids=2&categoryids=3 
8
  • 24
    What if I don't know how much variables I have in the array? What if it's like 1000? The request shouldn't be like that.
    – Sahar Ch.
    May 30, 2014 at 8:22
  • 9
    This gives me an error "An item with the same key has already been added.". It does however accept categoryids[0]=1&categoryids[1]=2& etc... Jul 11, 2014 at 14:03
  • 19
    This should be the accepted answer - @Hemanshu Bhojak: isn't it about time to take your pick? Mar 25, 2015 at 14:21
  • 17
    This reason for this is due to the following statement from the ASP.NET Web API website talking about parameter binding: "If the parameter is a “simple” type, Web API tries to get the value from the URI. Simple types include the .NET primitive types (int, bool, double, and so forth), plus TimeSpan, DateTime, Guid, decimal, and string, plus any type with a type converter that can convert from a string." an int[] is not a simple type.
    – Tr1stan
    Aug 6, 2015 at 13:03
  • 4
    This works well for me. One point. On the server code, the array parameter has to come first for it to work and any other parameters, after. When feeding in the parameters in the request, the order is unimportant.
    – Sparked
    Apr 23, 2016 at 13:47
111

As Filip W points out, you might have to resort to a custom model binder like this (modified to bind to actual type of param):

public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories([ModelBinder(typeof(CommaDelimitedArrayModelBinder))]long[] categoryIds) 
{
    // do your thing
}

public class CommaDelimitedArrayModelBinder : IModelBinder
{
    public bool BindModel(HttpActionContext actionContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        var key = bindingContext.ModelName;
        var val = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue(key);
        if (val != null)
        {
            var s = val.AttemptedValue;
            if (s != null)
            {
                var elementType = bindingContext.ModelType.GetElementType();
                var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(elementType);
                var values = Array.ConvertAll(s.Split(new[] { ","},StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries),
                    x => { return converter.ConvertFromString(x != null ? x.Trim() : x); });

                var typedValues = Array.CreateInstance(elementType, values.Length);

                values.CopyTo(typedValues, 0);

                bindingContext.Model = typedValues;
            }
            else
            {
                // change this line to null if you prefer nulls to empty arrays 
                bindingContext.Model = Array.CreateInstance(bindingContext.ModelType.GetElementType(), 0);
            }
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

And then you can say:

/Categories?categoryids=1,2,3,4 and ASP.NET Web API will correctly bind your categoryIds array.

11
  • 10
    This may violate SRP and/or SoC, but you can easily make this also inherit from ModelBinderAttribute so it can be used directly instead of the laborious syntax using the typeof() argument. All you have to do is inherit like so: CommaDelimitedArrayModelBinder : ModelBinderAttribute, IModelBinder and then provide a default constructor that pushes the type definition down to the base class: public CommaDelimitedArrayModelBinder() : base(typeof(CommaDelimitedArrayModelBinder)) { }. Jan 11, 2016 at 22:49
  • Otherwise, I really like this solution and am using it in my project, so... thanks. :) Jan 11, 2016 at 22:50
  • Aa a side note, this solution doesn't work with generics like System.Collections.Generic.List<long> as bindingContext.ModelType.GetElementType() only support System.Array types Jan 12, 2016 at 10:02
  • @ViRuSTriNiTy: This question and the answer specifically talk about Arrays. If you need a generic list based solution, that's fairly trivial to implement. Feel free to raise a separate question if you're not sure how to go about that.
    – Mrchief
    Jan 12, 2016 at 17:06
  • 2
    @codeMonkey: putting the array into the body makes good sense for a POST request, but what about GET requests? These usually have no content in the body. Aug 14, 2016 at 19:17
44

I recently came across this requirement myself, and I decided to implement an ActionFilter to handle this.

public class ArrayInputAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private readonly string _parameterName;

    public ArrayInputAttribute(string parameterName)
    {
        _parameterName = parameterName;
        Separator = ',';
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(HttpActionContext actionContext)
    {
        if (actionContext.ActionArguments.ContainsKey(_parameterName))
        {
            string parameters = string.Empty;
            if (actionContext.ControllerContext.RouteData.Values.ContainsKey(_parameterName))
                parameters = (string) actionContext.ControllerContext.RouteData.Values[_parameterName];
            else if (actionContext.ControllerContext.Request.RequestUri.ParseQueryString()[_parameterName] != null)
                parameters = actionContext.ControllerContext.Request.RequestUri.ParseQueryString()[_parameterName];

            actionContext.ActionArguments[_parameterName] = parameters.Split(Separator).Select(int.Parse).ToArray();
        }
    }

    public char Separator { get; set; }
}

I am applying it like so (note that I used 'id', not 'ids', as that is how it is specified in my route):

[ArrayInput("id", Separator = ';')]
public IEnumerable<Measure> Get(int[] id)
{
    return id.Select(i => GetData(i));
}

And the public url would be:

/api/Data/1;2;3;4

You may have to refactor this to meet your specific needs.

1
  • 1
    type int are hardcoded (int.Parse) in your solution . Imho, @Mrchief's solution is better
    – razon
    Jun 19, 2015 at 10:21
29

In case someone would need - to achieve same or similar thing(like delete) via POST instead of FromUri, use FromBody and on client side(JS/jQuery) format param as $.param({ '': categoryids }, true)

c#:

public IHttpActionResult Remove([FromBody] int[] categoryIds)

jQuery:

$.ajax({
        type: 'POST',
        data: $.param({ '': categoryids }, true),
        url: url,
//...
});

The thing with $.param({ '': categoryids }, true) is that it .net will expect post body to contain urlencoded value like =1&=2&=3 without parameter name, and without brackets.

6
  • 2
    No need to resort to a POST. See @Lavel answer. Aug 5, 2015 at 19:03
  • 3
    There is a limit in how much data you can send in a URI. And by standard, this should not be a GET request since it is actually modifying data.
    – Worthy7
    Oct 3, 2016 at 9:06
  • 2
    And where exactly did you see a GET here? :)
    – Sofija
    Oct 5, 2016 at 6:33
  • 3
    @Sofija OP says code to retrieve categories from database, thus the method should be a GET method, not POST.
    – Azimuth
    May 30, 2017 at 8:11
  • @Azimuth But in this answer/example, it is the Remove method, not a retrieve method.
    – Andrew
    Mar 11, 2021 at 14:22
26

Easy way to send array params to web api

API

public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories([FromUri]int[] categoryIds){
 // code to retrieve categories from database
}

Jquery : send JSON object as request params

$.get('api/categories/GetCategories',{categoryIds:[1,2,3,4]}).done(function(response){
console.log(response);
//success response
});

It will generate your request URL like ../api/categories/GetCategories?categoryIds=1&categoryIds=2&categoryIds=3&categoryIds=4

1
  • 9
    how is this different than the accepted answer? with the exception of implementing an ajax request via jquery which had nothing to do with the original post.
    – sksallaj
    Nov 14, 2018 at 23:57
16

You may try this code for you to take comma separated values / an array of values to get back a JSON from webAPI

 public class CategoryController : ApiController
 {
     public List<Category> Get(String categoryIDs)
     {
         List<Category> categoryRepo = new List<Category>();

         String[] idRepo = categoryIDs.Split(',');

         foreach (var id in idRepo)
         {
             categoryRepo.Add(new Category()
             {
                 CategoryID = id,
                 CategoryName = String.Format("Category_{0}", id)
             });
         }
         return categoryRepo;
     }
 }

 public class Category
 {
     public String CategoryID { get; set; }
     public String CategoryName { get; set; }
 } 

Output :

[
{"CategoryID":"4","CategoryName":"Category_4"}, 
{"CategoryID":"5","CategoryName":"Category_5"}, 
{"CategoryID":"3","CategoryName":"Category_3"} 
]
14

ASP.NET Core 2.0 Solution (Swagger Ready)

Input

DELETE /api/items/1,2
DELETE /api/items/1

Code

Write the provider (how MVC knows what binder to use)

public class CustomBinderProvider : IModelBinderProvider
{
    public IModelBinder GetBinder(ModelBinderProviderContext context)
    {
        if (context == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(context));
        }

        if (context.Metadata.ModelType == typeof(int[]) || context.Metadata.ModelType == typeof(List<int>))
        {
            return new BinderTypeModelBinder(typeof(CommaDelimitedArrayParameterBinder));
        }

        return null;
    }
}

Write the actual binder (access all sorts of info about the request, action, models, types, whatever)

public class CommaDelimitedArrayParameterBinder : IModelBinder
{

    public Task BindModelAsync(ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {

        var value = bindingContext.ActionContext.RouteData.Values[bindingContext.FieldName] as string;

        // Check if the argument value is null or empty
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        {
            return Task.CompletedTask;
        }

        var ints = value?.Split(',').Select(int.Parse).ToArray();

        bindingContext.Result = ModelBindingResult.Success(ints);

        if(bindingContext.ModelType == typeof(List<int>))
        {
            bindingContext.Result = ModelBindingResult.Success(ints.ToList());
        }

        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }
}

Register it with MVC

services.AddMvc(options =>
{
    // add custom binder to beginning of collection
    options.ModelBinderProviders.Insert(0, new CustomBinderProvider());
});

Sample usage with a well documented controller for Swagger

/// <summary>
/// Deletes a list of items.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="itemIds">The list of unique identifiers for the  items.</param>
/// <returns>The deleted item.</returns>
/// <response code="201">The item was successfully deleted.</response>
/// <response code="400">The item is invalid.</response>
[HttpDelete("{itemIds}", Name = ItemControllerRoute.DeleteItems)]
[ProducesResponseType(typeof(void), StatusCodes.Status204NoContent)]
[ProducesResponseType(typeof(void), StatusCodes.Status404NotFound)]
public async Task Delete(List<int> itemIds)
=> await _itemAppService.RemoveRangeAsync(itemIds);

EDIT: Microsoft recommends using a TypeConverter for these kids of operations over this approach. So follow the below posters advice and document your custom type with a SchemaFilter.

3
  • I think the MS recomendation you're talking about is satisfied by this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/49563970/4367683
    – Machado
    Oct 15, 2018 at 16:39
  • Did you see this? github.com/aspnet/Mvc/pull/7967 it looks as if they added a fix to start parsing List<whatever> in the query string without a need for a special binder. Also the post you linked is not ASPNET Core and I do not think helps with my situation. Oct 17, 2018 at 20:38
  • The best, non-hacky answer. Jun 10, 2019 at 23:16
11

Instead of using a custom ModelBinder, you can also use a custom type with a TypeConverter.

[TypeConverter(typeof(StrListConverter))]
public class StrList : List<string>
{
    public StrList(IEnumerable<string> collection) : base(collection) {}
}

public class StrListConverter : TypeConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type sourceType)
    {
        return sourceType == typeof(string) || base.CanConvertFrom(context, sourceType);
    }

    public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value)
    {
        if (value == null)
            return null;

        if (value is string s)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                return null;
            return new StrList(s.Split(','));
        }
        return base.ConvertFrom(context, culture, value);
    }
}

The advantage is that it makes the Web API method's parameters very simple. You dont't even need to specify [FromUri].

public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories(StrList categoryIds) {
  // code to retrieve categories from database
}

This example is for a List of strings, but you could do categoryIds.Select(int.Parse) or simply write an IntList instead.

5
  • Don't understand why this solution didn't get much votes. It is nice and clean and works with swagger without adding custom binders and stuff.
    – Thieme
    Aug 21, 2018 at 19:06
  • The best/cleanest answer in my opinion. Thanks PhillipM! Mar 18, 2019 at 12:00
  • 1
    Now (2020/2021) simply this works [HttpGet] public string GetMany([FromQuery] List<string> id) { return "something"; }
    – hB0
    Mar 8, 2021 at 18:11
  • Note that Swagger treats the array of integers as string. It works but would be nicer if Swagger would treat it as array of integers instead.
    – RM.
    Aug 8, 2021 at 23:46
  • @Thieme, I think that the answer got less votes because it requires to use a custom type rather than using standard types (i.e. array of int) In general, your API should use the same pattern for all methods so it is not a problem to register a custom binder. Sep 9, 2021 at 14:09
9

I originally used the solution that @Mrchief for years (it works great). But when when I added Swagger to my project for API documentation my end point was NOT showing up.

It took me a while, but this is what I came up with. It works with Swagger, and your API method signatures look cleaner:

In the end you can do:

    // GET: /api/values/1,2,3,4 

    [Route("api/values/{ids}")]
    public IHttpActionResult GetIds(int[] ids)
    {
        return Ok(ids);
    }

WebApiConfig.cs

public static class WebApiConfig
{
    public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
    {
        // Allow WebApi to Use a Custom Parameter Binding
        config.ParameterBindingRules.Add(descriptor => descriptor.ParameterType == typeof(int[]) && descriptor.ActionDescriptor.SupportedHttpMethods.Contains(HttpMethod.Get)
                                                           ? new CommaDelimitedArrayParameterBinder(descriptor)
                                                           : null);

        // Allow ApiExplorer to understand this type (Swagger uses ApiExplorer under the hood)
        TypeDescriptor.AddAttributes(typeof(int[]), new TypeConverterAttribute(typeof(StringToIntArrayConverter)));

        // Any existing Code ..

    }
}

Create a new class: CommaDelimitedArrayParameterBinder.cs

public class CommaDelimitedArrayParameterBinder : HttpParameterBinding, IValueProviderParameterBinding
{
    public CommaDelimitedArrayParameterBinder(HttpParameterDescriptor desc)
        : base(desc)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Handles Binding (Converts a comma delimited string into an array of integers)
    /// </summary>
    public override Task ExecuteBindingAsync(ModelMetadataProvider metadataProvider,
                                             HttpActionContext actionContext,
                                             CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var queryString = actionContext.ControllerContext.RouteData.Values[Descriptor.ParameterName] as string;

        var ints = queryString?.Split(',').Select(int.Parse).ToArray();

        SetValue(actionContext, ints);

        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }

    public IEnumerable<ValueProviderFactory> ValueProviderFactories { get; } = new[] { new QueryStringValueProviderFactory() };
}

Create a new class: StringToIntArrayConverter.cs

public class StringToIntArrayConverter : TypeConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type sourceType)
    {
        return sourceType == typeof(string) || base.CanConvertFrom(context, sourceType);
    }
}

Notes:

1
  • 3
    In-case anyone else needs info on the libraries this uses. Here is the using for "CommaDelimitedArrayParameterBinder ". using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Threading; using System.Threading.Tasks; using System.Web.Http.Controllers; using System.Web.Http.Metadata; using System.Web.Http.ModelBinding; using System.Web.Http.ValueProviders; using System.Web.Http.ValueProviders.Providers;
    – SteckDEV
    Mar 15, 2019 at 19:45
6
public class ArrayInputAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private readonly string[] _ParameterNames;
    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    public string Separator { get; set; }
    /// <summary>
    /// cons
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="parameterName"></param>
    public ArrayInputAttribute(params string[] parameterName)
    {
        _ParameterNames = parameterName;
        Separator = ",";
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    public void ProcessArrayInput(HttpActionContext actionContext, string parameterName)
    {
        if (actionContext.ActionArguments.ContainsKey(parameterName))
        {
            var parameterDescriptor = actionContext.ActionDescriptor.GetParameters().FirstOrDefault(p => p.ParameterName == parameterName);
            if (parameterDescriptor != null && parameterDescriptor.ParameterType.IsArray)
            {
                var type = parameterDescriptor.ParameterType.GetElementType();
                var parameters = String.Empty;
                if (actionContext.ControllerContext.RouteData.Values.ContainsKey(parameterName))
                {
                    parameters = (string)actionContext.ControllerContext.RouteData.Values[parameterName];
                }
                else
                {
                    var queryString = actionContext.ControllerContext.Request.RequestUri.ParseQueryString();
                    if (queryString[parameterName] != null)
                    {
                        parameters = queryString[parameterName];
                    }
                }

                var values = parameters.Split(new[] { Separator }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
                    .Select(TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(type).ConvertFromString).ToArray();
                var typedValues = Array.CreateInstance(type, values.Length);
                values.CopyTo(typedValues, 0);
                actionContext.ActionArguments[parameterName] = typedValues;
            }
        }
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(HttpActionContext actionContext)
    {
        _ParameterNames.ForEach(parameterName => ProcessArrayInput(actionContext, parameterName));
    }
}

Usage:

    [HttpDelete]
    [ArrayInput("tagIDs")]
    [Route("api/v1/files/{fileID}/tags/{tagIDs}")]
    public HttpResponseMessage RemoveFileTags(Guid fileID, Guid[] tagIDs)
    {
        _FileRepository.RemoveFileTags(fileID, tagIDs);
        return Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK);
    }

Request uri

http://localhost/api/v1/files/2a9937c7-8201-59b7-bc8d-11a9178895d0/tags/BBA5CD5D-F07D-47A9-8DEE-D19F5FA65F63,BBA5CD5D-F07D-47A9-8DEE-D19F5FA65F63
3
  • @Elsa Could you please point out which piece you can't understand? I think the code is quite clear to explanation it self. It's hard for me to explain this all in English, sorry.
    – Helwos
    Jul 17, 2014 at 1:41
  • @Steve Czetty here's my reconstructed version, thanks for your idea
    – Helwos
    Jul 17, 2014 at 1:46
  • Will it work with / as the seperator? Then you could have: dns/root/mystuff/path/to/some/resource mapped to public string GetMyStuff(params string[] pathBits)
    – RoboJ1M
    Oct 20, 2014 at 9:01
6

If you want to list/ array of integers easiest way to do this is accept the comma(,) separated list of string and convert it to list of integers.Do not forgot to mention [FromUri] attriubte.your url look like:

...?ID=71&accountID=1,2,3,289,56

public HttpResponseMessage test([FromUri]int ID, [FromUri]string accountID)
{
    List<int> accountIdList = new List<int>();
    string[] arrAccountId = accountId.Split(new char[] { ',' });
    for (var i = 0; i < arrAccountId.Length; i++)
    {
        try
        {
           accountIdList.Add(Int32.Parse(arrAccountId[i]));
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
        }
    }
}
3
  • why do you use List<string> instead of just string? it will only have one string in it which is 1,2,3,289,56 in your example. I will suggest an edit. May 20, 2016 at 14:20
  • Worked for me. I was surprised my controller wouldn't bind to a List<Guid> automatically though. Note in Asp.net Core the annotation is [FromQuery], and it is not needed.
    – kitsu.eb
    Jun 28, 2016 at 17:56
  • 2
    For a one-line Linq version: int[] accountIdArray = accountId.Split(',').Select(i => int.Parse(i)).ToArray(); I'd avoid the catch since it will mask somebody passing in bad data. Oct 13, 2017 at 14:27
6

I have created a custom model binder which converts any comma separated values (only primitive, decimal, float, string) to their corresponding arrays.

public class CommaSeparatedToArrayBinder<T> : IModelBinder
    {
        public bool BindModel(HttpActionContext actionContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
        {
            Type type = typeof(T);
            if (type.IsPrimitive || type == typeof(Decimal) || type == typeof(String) || type == typeof(float))
            {
                ValueProviderResult val = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue(bindingContext.ModelName);
                if (val == null) return false;

                string key = val.RawValue as string;
                if (key == null) { bindingContext.ModelState.AddModelError(bindingContext.ModelName, "Wrong value type"); return false; }

                string[] values = key.Split(',');
                IEnumerable<T> result = this.ConvertToDesiredList(values).ToArray();
                bindingContext.Model = result;
                return true;
            }

            bindingContext.ModelState.AddModelError(bindingContext.ModelName, "Only primitive, decimal, string and float data types are allowed...");
            return false;
        }

        private IEnumerable<T> ConvertToDesiredArray(string[] values)
        {
            foreach (string value in values)
            {
                var val = (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
                yield return val;
            }
        }
    }

And how to use in Controller:

 public IHttpActionResult Get([ModelBinder(BinderType = typeof(CommaSeparatedToArrayBinder<int>))] int[] ids)
        {
            return Ok(ids);
        }
1
  • 1
    Thanks, I've ported it to netcore 3.1 with little effort and it works! Accepted answer don't solve problem with need to specify param name many-many times and is the same as default operation in netcore 3.1 Apr 29, 2020 at 0:19
3

Make the method type [HttpPost], create a model that has one int[] parameter, and post with json:

/* Model */
public class CategoryRequestModel 
{
    public int[] Categories { get; set; }
}

/* WebApi */
[HttpPost]
public HttpResponseMessage GetCategories(CategoryRequestModel model)
{
    HttpResponseMessage resp = null;

    try
    {
        var categories = //your code to get categories

        resp = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, categories);

    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        resp = Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError, ex);
    }

    return resp;
}

/* jQuery */
var ajaxSettings = {
    type: 'POST',
    url: '/Categories',
    data: JSON.serialize({Categories: [1,2,3,4]}),
    contentType: 'application/json',
    success: function(data, textStatus, jqXHR)
    {
        //get categories from data
    }
};

$.ajax(ajaxSettings);
5
  • You're wrapping your array in a class - that will work fine (MVC/WebAPI notwithstanding). The OP was about binding to array without a wrapper class.
    – Mrchief
    Jun 10, 2016 at 16:02
  • 1
    The original problem doesn't say anything about doing it without a wrapper class, just that they wanted to use query params for complex objects. If you go down that path too far you'll get to a point where you need the API to pick up a really complex js object, and query param's will fail you. Might as well learn to do it the way that will work every time.
    – codeMonkey
    Jun 10, 2016 at 16:05
  • public IEnumerable<Category> GetCategories(int[] categoryIds){ - yeah you could interpret in different ways I suppose. But many a times, I do not want to create wrapper classes for the sake of creating wrappers. If you have complex objects, then that will just work. Supporting these simpler cases is what doesn't work out of the box, hence the OP.
    – Mrchief
    Jun 10, 2016 at 16:08
  • 3
    Doing this via POST is actually against the REST paradigm. Thus such API wouldn't be a REST API.
    – Azimuth
    May 30, 2017 at 8:08
  • 1
    @Azimuth give me a paradigm in one hand, what works with .NET in the other
    – codeMonkey
    May 30, 2017 at 16:38
3

Or you could just pass a string of delimited items and put it into an array or list on the receiving end.

0
2

I addressed this issue this way.

I used a post message to the api to send the list of integers as data.

Then I returned the data as an ienumerable.

The sending code is as follows:

public override IEnumerable<Contact> Fill(IEnumerable<int> ids)
{
    IEnumerable<Contact> result = null;
    if (ids!=null&&ids.Count()>0)
    {
        try
        {
            using (var client = new HttpClient())
            {
                client.BaseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost:49520/");
                client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Clear();
                client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));

                String _endPoint = "api/" + typeof(Contact).Name + "/ListArray";

                HttpResponseMessage response = client.PostAsJsonAsync<IEnumerable<int>>(_endPoint, ids).Result;
                response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();
                if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode)
                {
                    result = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<IEnumerable<Contact>>(response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result);
                }

            }

        }
        catch (Exception)
        {

        }
    }
    return result;
}

The receiving code is as follows:

// POST api/<controller>
[HttpPost]
[ActionName("ListArray")]
public IEnumerable<Contact> Post([FromBody]IEnumerable<int> ids)
{
    IEnumerable<Contact> result = null;
    if (ids != null && ids.Count() > 0)
    {
        return contactRepository.Fill(ids);
    }
    return result;
}

It works just fine for one record or many records. The fill is an overloaded method using DapperExtensions:

public override IEnumerable<Contact> Fill(IEnumerable<int> ids)
{
    IEnumerable<Contact> result = null;
    if (ids != null && ids.Count() > 0)
    {
        using (IDbConnection dbConnection = ConnectionProvider.OpenConnection())
        {
            dbConnection.Open();
            var predicate = Predicates.Field<Contact>(f => f.id, Operator.Eq, ids);
            result = dbConnection.GetList<Contact>(predicate);
            dbConnection.Close();
        }
    }
    return result;
}

This allows you to fetch data from a composite table (the id list), and then return the records you are really interested in from the target table.

You could do the same with a view, but this gives you a little more control and flexibility.

In addition, the details of what you are seeking from the database are not shown in the query string. You also do not have to convert from a csv file.

You have to keep in mind when using any tool like the web api 2.x interface is that the get, put, post, delete, head, etc., functions have a general use, but are not restricted to that use.

So, while post is generally used in a create context in the web api interface, it is not restricted to that use. It is a regular html call that can be used for any purpose permitted by html practice.

In addition, the details of what is going on are hidden from those "prying eyes" we hear so much about these days.

The flexibility in naming conventions in the web api 2.x interface and use of regular web calling means you send a call to the web api that misleads snoopers into thinking you are really doing something else. You can use "POST" to really retrieve data, for example.

0

My solution was to create an attribute to validate strings, it does a bunch of extra common features, including regex validation that you can use to check for numbers only and then later I convert to integers as needed...

This is how you use:

public class MustBeListAndContainAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    private Regex regex = null;
    public bool RemoveDuplicates { get; }
    public string Separator { get; }
    public int MinimumItems { get; }
    public int MaximumItems { get; }

    public MustBeListAndContainAttribute(string regexEachItem,
        int minimumItems = 1,
        int maximumItems = 0,
        string separator = ",",
        bool removeDuplicates = false) : base()
    {
        this.MinimumItems = minimumItems;
        this.MaximumItems = maximumItems;
        this.Separator = separator;
        this.RemoveDuplicates = removeDuplicates;

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(regexEachItem))
            regex = new Regex(regexEachItem, RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.Singleline | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        var listOfdValues = (value as List<string>)?[0];

        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(listOfdValues))
        {
            if (MinimumItems > 0)
                return new ValidationResult(this.ErrorMessage);
            else
                return null;
        };

        var list = new List<string>();

        list.AddRange(listOfdValues.Split(new[] { Separator }, System.StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries));

        if (RemoveDuplicates) list = list.Distinct().ToList();

        var prop = validationContext.ObjectType.GetProperty(validationContext.MemberName);
        prop.SetValue(validationContext.ObjectInstance, list);
        value = list;

        if (regex != null)
            if (list.Any(c => string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(c) || !regex.IsMatch(c)))
                return new ValidationResult(this.ErrorMessage);

        return null;
    }
}
0

I just added the Query key (Refit lib) in the property for the request.

[Query(CollectionFormat.Multi)]

public class ExampleRequest
{
       
        [FromQuery(Name = "name")]
        public string Name { get; set; }               
       
        [AliasAs("category")]
        [Query(CollectionFormat.Multi)]
        public List<string> Categories { get; set; }
}
1
  • How would the request look like for this solution and does this work with Swagger Docs?
    – CodeHat
    Jan 17 at 16:30

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