27

Consider

CREATE TABLE foo (
    id SERIAL,
    foo_created_on ABSTIME,
    foo_deactivated_on ABSTIME,
    PRIMARY KEY (id, foo_created_on)
);

CREATE TABLE bar (
    id SERIAL,
    bar_created_on ABSTIME,
    bar_deactivated_on ABSTIME,
    foo_id REFERENCES ( .. what goes here? ..),
    PRIMARY KEY (id, bar_created_on)
);

How do I create an FK in "bar" that references the PK in "foo"?

  • 3
    Btw: the "ABSTIME" data type is de-supported. You should use DATE or TIMESTAMP instead. – a_horse_with_no_name Apr 2 '12 at 22:36
39

How do I create an FK in "bar" that references the PK in "foo"?

With your current structure, you can't.

The target of a foreign key reference has to be declared either PRIMARY KEY or UNIQUE. So either this

CREATE TABLE foo (
    id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
    foo_created_on ABSTIME,
    foo_deactivated_on ABSTIME,
    UNIQUE (id, foo_created_on)
);

or this

CREATE TABLE foo (
    id SERIAL,
    foo_created_on ABSTIME,
    foo_deactivated_on ABSTIME,
    PRIMARY KEY (id, foo_created_on),
    UNIQUE (id)
);

would work as a target for bar.foo_id. Then bar would have a simple reference.

CREATE TABLE bar (
    id SERIAL,
    bar_created_on ABSTIME,
    bar_deactivated_on ABSTIME,
    foo_id REFERENCES foo (id),
    PRIMARY KEY (id, bar_created_on)
);

If you want to reference the primary key you originally declared in foo, you have to store that primary key in bar. You have to store all of it, not part of it. So without modifying foo, you could build bar like this.

CREATE TABLE bar (
    id SERIAL,
    bar_created_on ABSTIME,
    bar_deactivated_on ABSTIME,
    foo_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
    foo_created_on ABSTIME NOT NULL,
    FOREIGN KEY (foo_id, foo_created_on) REFERENCES foo (id, foo_created_on),
    PRIMARY KEY (id, bar_created_on)
);
17

You have to create separate foreign keys:

CREATE TABLE bar (
  id SERIAL,
  bar_created_on ABSTIME,
  bar_deactivated_on ABSTIME,
  foo_id INT,
  FOREIGN KEY (foo_id, created_on) REFERENCES foo (id, created_on),
  PRIMARY KEY (id, bar_created_on)
);
  • sorry, not clear... (I should have given the "created_on" column distinctive names to disambiguate... see the updated question now). Is the above incantation in "bar" schema? Keep in mind, bar's created_on tracks created_on for bar entries, not foo entries. – punkish Apr 2 '12 at 21:31
  • I updated the answer. I don't know what your foo_id was for, therefore I just made it an int. References are pretty easy, but maybe I don't understand what you mean. – Dave Halter Apr 2 '12 at 22:11

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