1

I just started using View & Domain model design in my MVC web app but got the question where to perform calculations and other View related actions. I will try to give example below.

My Domain Model (Linq2Sql)

public class Product
{
  public int Id;
  public string Name;
}

The View Model with new UserCount property which I would like to calculate.

public class ProductViewModel
{
  public int Id;
  public string Name;
  public int UserCount;
}

My controller action looks like

public ActionResult _SelectionClientSide_Products()
{
  IQueryable<Product> products = _repository.GetProducts(true); 
  var  model = Mapper.Map<IEnumerable<Product>, IEnumerable<ProductViewModel>>(products);                                
  return View(model);
}

I query for data using repository method and get IQueryable<Product> and map it to ProductViewModel list. But I also need to perform another query operation to count users for every queried product and assign all values to ProductViewModel. What design I should follow to achieve this?

The relationship between tables

Products -> Orders - > Users

EDIT

I have decided to remove AutoMapper because it gives more problems than benefits and created my own Builder which contain everything what I need. I make field assign and also add calculation.

    public ActionResult _SelectionClientSide_Products()
    {        
      Data = new ProductViewModelBuilder(_repository).Build();
      return View(Data);
    }

namespace PC.Models
{
            public class ProductViewModel
            {
                public int Id { get; set; }
                public string Name { get; set; }
                public int UsersCount { get; set; }
            }

            public class ProductViewModelBuilder
             {
                 private readonly IDataAccess _repository;

                 public ProductViewModelBuilder(IDataAccess repository)
                 {
                     _repository = repository;
                 }

                 public IQueryable<ProductViewModel> Build()
                 {
                     return _repository.GetProducts().Select(p=> new ProductViewModel
                                                                         {
                                                                             Id = p.Id, 
                                                                             Name = p.Name,
                                                                             UsersCount = _repository.CountUsers(p.Id)
                                                                         });         
                 }

            }
        }
0

In my opinion, by the time your Controller has begun it's model setup, there should be no more "logic" or talking to the model. Having a "builder" which queries the model again is bad practice. Not really "breaking" the MVC pattern, but still bad practice. Your ViewModel has a dependency on your DAL. Bad bad boy. :)

If you have to run another query, well that should be encapsulated in the original query. Instead of calling _repository.GetProducts, call a different method which not only gets the products, but get's the count as well. Create a DTO if necessary.

Then your controller should look like:

public ActionResult _SelectionClientSide_Products()
{
  var someDto = _repository.GetProductsAndUserCount(true); 
  var  model = Mapper.Map<IEnumerable<SomeDto>, IEnumerable<ProductViewModel>>(someDto);                                
  return View(model);
}

Personally i go for generic repositories over specialized ones, as i don't want a IProductRepository interface with 50 signatures. I opt for LINQ IEnumerable<T> extensions (aka "pipes and filters") which allows complex queries to be built and remain in my domain.

So my version of the above would be:

public ActionResult _SelectionClientSide_Products()
{
  var someDto = _productRepository.Find().WithSomeCondition(true).ToSomeDto(); 
  var  model = Mapper.Map<IEnumerable<SomeDto>, IEnumerable<ProductViewModel>>(someDto);                                
  return View(model);
}

On a side note, why do you say AutoMapper causes you more problems that benefits? AutoMapper has saved me tons and tons of repetitive code. If you know how to use it properly, it's your best friend. Hands down the most important NuGet package in my current application.

  • I have read that is it bad practice to create additional fields in Domain model if these fields are only required once in one View model. If your example _repository.GetProductsAndUserCount method return Domain model(not sure but it seems so) but it is do not have UserCount field by default. So do you suggest to create Calculate Field in Domain Model(i use linq2sql and it this case Domain partial class would be extended)? But as I said I have read that it is not practical. – Tomas Apr 3 '12 at 11:00
  • @Tomas - it's a DTO. So it's purpose is to wrap one or more domain objects so it can be trasferred down the app stack. How is that bad practice? Your ProductViewModelBuilder is bad practice. – RPM1984 Apr 3 '12 at 21:16
  • I use Linq2SQL and my DTO is automatic generated classes by Linq2Sql builder. Product(DTO) class do not have UserCount property, I can extend it using Partial class but it is not rational because the same Product class is used elsewhere. So should I create another DTO class similar to Product DTO generated by Linq2Sql and add UserCount property and then use var someDto = _productRepository.Find().WithSomeCondition(true).ToSomeDto();? – Tomas Apr 4 '12 at 10:48
  • @Tomas - LINQ2SQL?? Dude, if you have the option, ditch L2SQL and move onto EF or something more mature. I haven't used L2SQL for ages so i can't remember how it works but can't you just do a specialized L2SQL query and map the result to another object - e.g a DTO, not the Products object, but another one? Or create a SQL Server View and map that on the designer? – RPM1984 Apr 4 '12 at 11:21
  • Yes, I decided to go with SQL Server View, done calculation in view and got fully functional DTO without need to create or map to other object. I am considering to move to EF in near future. Thank you for your help. – Tomas Apr 4 '12 at 12:24

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