135

I am trying to create a nice column list in python for use with commandline admin tools which I create.

Basicly, I want a list like:

[['a', 'b', 'c'], ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']]

To turn into:

a            b            c
aaaaaaaaaa   b            c
a            bbbbbbbbbb   c

Using plain tabs wont do the trick here because I don't know the longest data in each row.

This is the same behavior as 'column -t' in Linux..

$ echo -e "a b c\naaaaaaaaaa b c\na bbbbbbbbbb c"
a b c
aaaaaaaaaa b c
a bbbbbbbbbb c

$ echo -e "a b c\naaaaaaaaaa b c\na bbbbbbbbbb c" | column -t
a           b           c
aaaaaaaaaa  b           c
a           bbbbbbbbbb  c

I have looked around for various python libraries to do this but can't find anything useful.

1
  • 4
    Using ncurses is a little overkill for displaying the small ~10 lines of information I want.. But we are using ncurses for other stuff. – xeor Apr 3 '12 at 8:43

18 Answers 18

130
data = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']]

col_width = max(len(word) for row in data for word in row) + 2  # padding
for row in data:
    print "".join(word.ljust(col_width) for word in row)

a            b            c            
aaaaaaaaaa   b            c            
a            bbbbbbbbbb   c   

What this does is calculate the longest data entry to determine the column width, then use .ljust() to add the necessary padding when printing out each column.

7
  • 2
    The name longest is misleading beacuse it's not the longest element but the max_length. BTW the longest could be taken with something like: max((w for sub in data for w in sub), key=len). [P.S. I wasn't the one to downvote] – Rik Poggi Apr 3 '12 at 8:19
  • 1
    max((w for ...), key=len) gives you the longest entry and you'll then need to do a run len again. Couldn't decide which was clear so I stuck with the first. Good point on the misleading var name. Changed. – Shawn Chin Apr 3 '12 at 8:26
  • 1
    Yes, there's no big difference with one or the other, just a matter of taste I'd say. Apart from that, as you noticed, that line is a bit (too) confused. It would be better to do it directly: max(len(x) for sub in data for x in sub), that also doesn't build unnecessary lists. – Rik Poggi Apr 3 '12 at 8:31
  • 1
    Thanks! This is exactly what I need. However, I had to get it to work with python 2.4 as well, so I tok away chain.from_iterable, and replaced col_width with max(len(x) for sub in data for x in sub) + 2 as suggested. Hope you can change your code above to make it clear if someone else wants this to run with 2.4. – xeor Apr 3 '12 at 8:48
  • 3
    This will make all columns the same width, which is not what column -t does. – intuited Dec 5 '12 at 0:54
170

Since Python 2.6+, you can use a format string in the following way to set the columns to a minimum of 20 characters and align text to right.

table_data = [
    ['a', 'b', 'c'],
    ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], 
    ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']
]
for row in table_data:
    print("{: >20} {: >20} {: >20}".format(*row))

Output:

               a                    b                    c
      aaaaaaaaaa                    b                    c
               a           bbbbbbbbbb                    c
7
  • 10
    by far the best solution as of now – zlr Apr 18 '14 at 10:17
  • This only ever shows 9 items when I tried to use it. – Dorian Dore May 7 '15 at 2:48
  • 9
    Adding onto the solution from KurzedMetal, in the format specifier shown above; {: >20}, the > indicates right alignment. By using {: <20} you would get a left aligned column and by using {: ^20} you would get a centered aligned column. – Dale Moore Sep 25 '17 at 18:25
  • 1
    The syntaxis is {:>20.2f} if you want to combine it with other format specifiers, such as ` .2f`. – Dr_Zaszuś Apr 22 '20 at 15:53
  • 1
    I don't think this answers the question—it sounds like the OP wants to make each row no wider than it needs to be to hold its contents. This just sets a fixed width of 20. – intuited May 5 '20 at 22:05
49

I came here with the same requirements but @lvc and @Preet's answers seems more inline with what column -t produces in that columns have different widths:

>>> rows =  [   ['a',           'b',            'c',    'd']
...         ,   ['aaaaaaaaaa',  'b',            'c',    'd']
...         ,   ['a',           'bbbbbbbbbb',   'c',    'd']
...         ]
...

>>> widths = [max(map(len, col)) for col in zip(*rows)]
>>> for row in rows:
...     print "  ".join((val.ljust(width) for val, width in zip(row, widths)))
...
a           b           c  d
aaaaaaaaaa  b           c  d
a           bbbbbbbbbb  c  d
4
  • 3
    Nice. This is the clearest solution that actually follows the original "spec". – intuited Dec 5 '12 at 0:56
  • 2
    This is the solution that worked for me. Other solutions produced columnar output but this one gave the most control on the padding along with accurate column widths. – Michael J Jun 12 '14 at 22:23
  • 2
    Beautiful solution. For any columns not strings, just add an extra map: map(len, map(str, col)). – Druckles Sep 24 '15 at 9:04
  • Fantastic answer, thanks! I changed the print ... to print string.rstrip(...), and this formats a bit nicer in a terminal (large amounts of trailing whitespace can show as unnecessary blank lines due to text wrapping). – 808sound Dec 10 '20 at 7:14
18

This is a little late to the party, and a shameless plug for a package I wrote, but you can also check out the Columnar package.

It takes a list of lists of input and a list of headers and outputs a table-formatted string. This snippet creates a docker-esque table:

from columnar import columnar

headers = ['name', 'id', 'host', 'notes']

data = [
    ['busybox', 'c3c37d5d-38d2-409f-8d02-600fd9d51239', 'linuxnode-1-292735', 'Test server.'],
    ['alpine-python', '6bb77855-0fda-45a9-b553-e19e1a795f1e', 'linuxnode-2-249253', 'The one that runs python.'],
    ['redis', 'afb648ba-ac97-4fb2-8953-9a5b5f39663e', 'linuxnode-3-3416918', 'For queues and stuff.'],
    ['app-server', 'b866cd0f-bf80-40c7-84e3-c40891ec68f9', 'linuxnode-4-295918', 'A popular destination.'],
    ['nginx', '76fea0f0-aa53-4911-b7e4-fae28c2e469b', 'linuxnode-5-292735', 'Traffic Cop'],
]

table = columnar(data, headers, no_borders=True)
print(table)

Table Displaying No-border Style

Or you can get a little fancier with colors and borders. Table Displaying Spring Classics

To read more about the column-sizing algorithm and see the rest of the API you can check out the link above or see the Columnar GitHub Repo

1
  • This is a really nice and useful package. I've loved it! Congratulations! – Talendar Jan 13 at 20:55
9

You have to do this with 2 passes:

  1. get the maximum width of each column.
  2. formatting the columns using our knowledge of max width from the first pass using str.ljust() and str.rjust()
1
  • short and sweet. – Sunny Nov 23 '20 at 9:15
8

Wow, only 17 answers. The zen of python says "There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it."

So here is an 18th way to do it: The tabulate package supports a bunch of data types that it can display as tables, here is a simple example adapted from their docs:

from tabulate import tabulate

table = [["Sun",696000,1989100000],
         ["Earth",6371,5973.6],
         ["Moon",1737,73.5],
         ["Mars",3390,641.85]]

print(tabulate(table, headers=["Planet","R (km)", "mass (x 10^29 kg)"]))

which outputs

Planet      R (km)    mass (x 10^29 kg)
--------  --------  -------------------
Sun         696000           1.9891e+09
Earth         6371        5973.6
Moon          1737          73.5
Mars          3390         641.85
1
  • Looks pretty right in the first try. It deals with lists and lists of lists hat makes it very easy to use. – Stefatronik Apr 21 at 10:42
7

Transposing the columns like that is a job for zip:

>>> a = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']]
>>> list(zip(*a))
[('a', 'aaaaaaaaaa', 'a'), ('b', 'b', 'bbbbbbbbbb'), ('c', 'c', 'c')]

To find the required length of each column, you can use max:

>>> trans_a = zip(*a)
>>> [max(len(c) for c in b) for b in trans_a]
[10, 10, 1]

Which you can use, with suitable padding, to construct strings to pass to print:

>>> col_lenghts = [max(len(c) for c in b) for b in trans_a]
>>> padding = ' ' # You might want more
>>> padding.join(s.ljust(l) for s,l in zip(a[0], col_lenghts))
'a          b          c'
6

To get fancier tables like

---------------------------------------------------
| First Name | Last Name        | Age | Position  |
---------------------------------------------------
| John       | Smith            | 24  | Software  |
|            |                  |     | Engineer  |
---------------------------------------------------
| Mary       | Brohowski        | 23  | Sales     |
|            |                  |     | Manager   |
---------------------------------------------------
| Aristidis  | Papageorgopoulos | 28  | Senior    |
|            |                  |     | Reseacher |
---------------------------------------------------

you can use this Python recipe:

'''
From http://code.activestate.com/recipes/267662-table-indentation/
PSF License
'''
import cStringIO,operator

def indent(rows, hasHeader=False, headerChar='-', delim=' | ', justify='left',
           separateRows=False, prefix='', postfix='', wrapfunc=lambda x:x):
    """Indents a table by column.
       - rows: A sequence of sequences of items, one sequence per row.
       - hasHeader: True if the first row consists of the columns' names.
       - headerChar: Character to be used for the row separator line
         (if hasHeader==True or separateRows==True).
       - delim: The column delimiter.
       - justify: Determines how are data justified in their column. 
         Valid values are 'left','right' and 'center'.
       - separateRows: True if rows are to be separated by a line
         of 'headerChar's.
       - prefix: A string prepended to each printed row.
       - postfix: A string appended to each printed row.
       - wrapfunc: A function f(text) for wrapping text; each element in
         the table is first wrapped by this function."""
    # closure for breaking logical rows to physical, using wrapfunc
    def rowWrapper(row):
        newRows = [wrapfunc(item).split('\n') for item in row]
        return [[substr or '' for substr in item] for item in map(None,*newRows)]
    # break each logical row into one or more physical ones
    logicalRows = [rowWrapper(row) for row in rows]
    # columns of physical rows
    columns = map(None,*reduce(operator.add,logicalRows))
    # get the maximum of each column by the string length of its items
    maxWidths = [max([len(str(item)) for item in column]) for column in columns]
    rowSeparator = headerChar * (len(prefix) + len(postfix) + sum(maxWidths) + \
                                 len(delim)*(len(maxWidths)-1))
    # select the appropriate justify method
    justify = {'center':str.center, 'right':str.rjust, 'left':str.ljust}[justify.lower()]
    output=cStringIO.StringIO()
    if separateRows: print >> output, rowSeparator
    for physicalRows in logicalRows:
        for row in physicalRows:
            print >> output, \
                prefix \
                + delim.join([justify(str(item),width) for (item,width) in zip(row,maxWidths)]) \
                + postfix
        if separateRows or hasHeader: print >> output, rowSeparator; hasHeader=False
    return output.getvalue()

# written by Mike Brown
# http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Cookbook/Python/Recipe/148061
def wrap_onspace(text, width):
    """
    A word-wrap function that preserves existing line breaks
    and most spaces in the text. Expects that existing line
    breaks are posix newlines (\n).
    """
    return reduce(lambda line, word, width=width: '%s%s%s' %
                  (line,
                   ' \n'[(len(line[line.rfind('\n')+1:])
                         + len(word.split('\n',1)[0]
                              ) >= width)],
                   word),
                  text.split(' ')
                 )

import re
def wrap_onspace_strict(text, width):
    """Similar to wrap_onspace, but enforces the width constraint:
       words longer than width are split."""
    wordRegex = re.compile(r'\S{'+str(width)+r',}')
    return wrap_onspace(wordRegex.sub(lambda m: wrap_always(m.group(),width),text),width)

import math
def wrap_always(text, width):
    """A simple word-wrap function that wraps text on exactly width characters.
       It doesn't split the text in words."""
    return '\n'.join([ text[width*i:width*(i+1)] \
                       for i in xrange(int(math.ceil(1.*len(text)/width))) ])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    labels = ('First Name', 'Last Name', 'Age', 'Position')
    data = \
    '''John,Smith,24,Software Engineer
       Mary,Brohowski,23,Sales Manager
       Aristidis,Papageorgopoulos,28,Senior Reseacher'''
    rows = [row.strip().split(',')  for row in data.splitlines()]

    print 'Without wrapping function\n'
    print indent([labels]+rows, hasHeader=True)
    # test indent with different wrapping functions
    width = 10
    for wrapper in (wrap_always,wrap_onspace,wrap_onspace_strict):
        print 'Wrapping function: %s(x,width=%d)\n' % (wrapper.__name__,width)
        print indent([labels]+rows, hasHeader=True, separateRows=True,
                     prefix='| ', postfix=' |',
                     wrapfunc=lambda x: wrapper(x,width))

    # output:
    #
    #Without wrapping function
    #
    #First Name | Last Name        | Age | Position         
    #-------------------------------------------------------
    #John       | Smith            | 24  | Software Engineer
    #Mary       | Brohowski        | 23  | Sales Manager    
    #Aristidis  | Papageorgopoulos | 28  | Senior Reseacher 
    #
    #Wrapping function: wrap_always(x,width=10)
    #
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| First Name | Last Name  | Age | Position   |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| John       | Smith      | 24  | Software E |
    #|            |            |     | ngineer    |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| Mary       | Brohowski  | 23  | Sales Mana |
    #|            |            |     | ger        |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #| Aristidis  | Papageorgo | 28  | Senior Res |
    #|            | poulos     |     | eacher     |
    #----------------------------------------------
    #
    #Wrapping function: wrap_onspace(x,width=10)
    #
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| First Name | Last Name        | Age | Position  |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| John       | Smith            | 24  | Software  |
    #|            |                  |     | Engineer  |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| Mary       | Brohowski        | 23  | Sales     |
    #|            |                  |     | Manager   |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #| Aristidis  | Papageorgopoulos | 28  | Senior    |
    #|            |                  |     | Reseacher |
    #---------------------------------------------------
    #
    #Wrapping function: wrap_onspace_strict(x,width=10)
    #
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| First Name | Last Name  | Age | Position  |
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| John       | Smith      | 24  | Software  |
    #|            |            |     | Engineer  |
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| Mary       | Brohowski  | 23  | Sales     |
    #|            |            |     | Manager   |
    #---------------------------------------------
    #| Aristidis  | Papageorgo | 28  | Senior    |
    #|            | poulos     |     | Reseacher |
    #---------------------------------------------

The Python recipe page contains a few improvements on it.

5

pandas based solution with creating dataframe:

import pandas as pd
l = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']]
df = pd.DataFrame(l)

print(df)
            0           1  2
0           a           b  c
1  aaaaaaaaaa           b  c
2           a  bbbbbbbbbb  c

To remove index and header values to create output what you want you could use to_string method:

result = df.to_string(index=False, header=False)

print(result)
          a           b  c
 aaaaaaaaaa           b  c
          a  bbbbbbbbbb  c
2

Scolp is a new library that lets you pretty print streaming columnar data easily while auto-adjusting column width.

(Disclaimer: I am the author)

2

For lazy people

that are using Python 3.* and Pandas/Geopandas; universal simple in-class approach (for 'normal' script just remove self):

Function colorize:

    def colorize(self,s,color):
        s = color+str(s)+"\033[0m"
        return s

Header:

print('{0:<23} {1:>24} {2:>26} {3:>26} {4:>11} {5:>11}'.format('Road name','Classification','Function','Form of road','Length','Distance') )

and then data from Pandas/Geopandas dataframe:

            for index, row in clipped.iterrows():
                rdName      = self.colorize(row['name1'],"\033[32m")
                rdClass     = self.colorize(row['roadClassification'],"\033[93m")
                rdFunction  = self.colorize(row['roadFunction'],"\033[33m")
                rdForm      = self.colorize(row['formOfWay'],"\033[94m")
                rdLength    = self.colorize(row['length'],"\033[97m")
                rdDistance  = self.colorize(row['distance'],"\033[96m")
                print('{0:<30} {1:>35} {2:>35} {3:>35} {4:>20} {5:>20}'.format(rdName,rdClass,rdFunction,rdForm,rdLength,rdDistance) )

Meaning of {0:<30} {1:>35} {2:>35} {3:>35} {4:>20} {5:>20}:

0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 -> columns, there are 6 in total in this case

30, 35, 20 -> width of column (note that you'll have to add length of \033[96m - this for Python is a string as well), just experiment :)

>, < -> justify: right, left (there is = for filling with zeros as well)

If you want to distinct e.g. max value, you'll have to switch to special Pandas style function, but suppose that's far enough to present data on terminal window.

Result:

enter image description here

1

This sets independent, best-fit column widths based on the max-metric used in other answers.

data = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']]
padding = 2
col_widths = [max(len(w) for w in [r[cn] for r in data]) + padding for cn in range(len(data[0]))]
format_string = "{{:{}}}{{:{}}}{{:{}}}".format(*col_widths)
for row in data:
    print(format_string.format(*row))
1
  • This is the superior answer, though the code is a bit smelly. – Sam Morgan Feb 27 '20 at 18:18
1

A slight variation on a previous answer (I don't have enough rep to comment on it). The format library lets you specify the width and alignment of an element but not where it starts, ie, you can say "be 20 columns wide" but not "start in column 20". Which leads to this issue:

table_data = [
    ['a', 'b', 'c'],
    ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], 
    ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']
]

print("first row: {: >20} {: >20} {: >20}".format(*table_data[0]))
print("second row: {: >20} {: >20} {: >20}".format(*table_data[1]))
print("third row: {: >20} {: >20} {: >20}".format(*table_data[2]))

Output

first row:                    a                    b                    c
second row:           aaaaaaaaaa                    b                    c
third row:                    a           bbbbbbbbbb                    c

The answer of course is to format the literal strings as well, which combines slightly weirdly with the format:

table_data = [
    ['a', 'b', 'c'],
    ['aaaaaaaaaa', 'b', 'c'], 
    ['a', 'bbbbbbbbbb', 'c']
]

print(f"{'first row:': <20} {table_data[0][0]: >20} {table_data[0][1]: >20} {table_data[0][2]: >20}")
print("{: <20} {: >20} {: >20} {: >20}".format(*['second row:', *table_data[1]]))
print("{: <20} {: >20} {: >20} {: >20}".format(*['third row:', *table_data[1]]))

Output

first row:                              a                    b                    c
second row:                    aaaaaaaaaa                    b                    c
third row:                     aaaaaaaaaa                    b                    c
0

I found this answer super-helpful and elegant, originally from here:

matrix = [["A", "B"], ["C", "D"]]

print('\n'.join(['\t'.join([str(cell) for cell in row]) for row in matrix]))

Output

A   B
C   D
0

Here is a variation of the Shawn Chin's answer. The width is fixed per column, not over all columns. There is also a border below the first row and between the columns. (icontract library is used to enforce the contracts.)

@icontract.pre(
    lambda table: not table or all(len(row) == len(table[0]) for row in table))
@icontract.post(lambda table, result: result == "" if not table else True)
@icontract.post(lambda result: not result.endswith("\n"))
def format_table(table: List[List[str]]) -> str:
    """
    Format the table as equal-spaced columns.

    :param table: rows of cells
    :return: table as string
    """
    cols = len(table[0])

    col_widths = [max(len(row[i]) for row in table) for i in range(cols)]

    lines = []  # type: List[str]
    for i, row in enumerate(table):
        parts = []  # type: List[str]

        for cell, width in zip(row, col_widths):
            parts.append(cell.ljust(width))

        line = " | ".join(parts)
        lines.append(line)

        if i == 0:
            border = []  # type: List[str]

            for width in col_widths:
                border.append("-" * width)

            lines.append("-+-".join(border))

    result = "\n".join(lines)

    return result

Here is an example:

>>> table = [['column 0', 'another column 1'], ['00', '01'], ['10', '11']]
>>> result = packagery._format_table(table=table)
>>> print(result)
column 0 | another column 1
---------+-----------------
00       | 01              
10       | 11              
0

updated @Franck Dernoncourt fancy recipe to be python 3 and PEP8 compliant

import io
import math
import operator
import re
import functools

from itertools import zip_longest


def indent(
    rows,
    has_header=False,
    header_char="-",
    delim=" | ",
    justify="left",
    separate_rows=False,
    prefix="",
    postfix="",
    wrapfunc=lambda x: x,
):
    """Indents a table by column.
       - rows: A sequence of sequences of items, one sequence per row.
       - hasHeader: True if the first row consists of the columns' names.
       - headerChar: Character to be used for the row separator line
         (if hasHeader==True or separateRows==True).
       - delim: The column delimiter.
       - justify: Determines how are data justified in their column.
         Valid values are 'left','right' and 'center'.
       - separateRows: True if rows are to be separated by a line
         of 'headerChar's.
       - prefix: A string prepended to each printed row.
       - postfix: A string appended to each printed row.
       - wrapfunc: A function f(text) for wrapping text; each element in
         the table is first wrapped by this function."""

    # closure for breaking logical rows to physical, using wrapfunc
    def row_wrapper(row):
        new_rows = [wrapfunc(item).split("\n") for item in row]
        return [[substr or "" for substr in item] for item in zip_longest(*new_rows)]

    # break each logical row into one or more physical ones
    logical_rows = [row_wrapper(row) for row in rows]
    # columns of physical rows
    columns = zip_longest(*functools.reduce(operator.add, logical_rows))
    # get the maximum of each column by the string length of its items
    max_widths = [max([len(str(item)) for item in column]) for column in columns]
    row_separator = header_char * (
        len(prefix) + len(postfix) + sum(max_widths) + len(delim) * (len(max_widths) - 1)
    )
    # select the appropriate justify method
    justify = {"center": str.center, "right": str.rjust, "left": str.ljust}[
        justify.lower()
    ]
    output = io.StringIO()
    if separate_rows:
        print(output, row_separator)
    for physicalRows in logical_rows:
        for row in physicalRows:
            print( output, prefix + delim.join(
                [justify(str(item), width) for (item, width) in zip(row, max_widths)]
            ) + postfix)
        if separate_rows or has_header:
            print(output, row_separator)
            has_header = False
    return output.getvalue()


# written by Mike Brown
# http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Cookbook/Python/Recipe/148061
def wrap_onspace(text, width):
    """
    A word-wrap function that preserves existing line breaks
    and most spaces in the text. Expects that existing line
    breaks are posix newlines (\n).
    """
    return functools.reduce(
        lambda line, word, i_width=width: "%s%s%s"
        % (
            line,
            " \n"[
                (
                    len(line[line.rfind("\n") + 1 :]) + len(word.split("\n", 1)[0])
                    >= i_width
                )
            ],
            word,
        ),
        text.split(" "),
    )


def wrap_onspace_strict(text, i_width):
    """Similar to wrap_onspace, but enforces the width constraint:
       words longer than width are split."""
    word_regex = re.compile(r"\S{" + str(i_width) + r",}")
    return wrap_onspace(
        word_regex.sub(lambda m: wrap_always(m.group(), i_width), text), i_width
    )


def wrap_always(text, width):
    """A simple word-wrap function that wraps text on exactly width characters.
       It doesn't split the text in words."""
    return "\n".join(
        [
            text[width * i : width * (i + 1)]
            for i in range(int(math.ceil(1.0 * len(text) / width)))
        ]
    )


if __name__ == "__main__":
    labels = ("First Name", "Last Name", "Age", "Position")
    data = """John,Smith,24,Software Engineer
           Mary,Brohowski,23,Sales Manager
           Aristidis,Papageorgopoulos,28,Senior Reseacher"""
    rows = [row.strip().split(",") for row in data.splitlines()]

    print("Without wrapping function\n")
    print(indent([labels] + rows, has_header=True))

    # test indent with different wrapping functions
    width = 10
    for wrapper in (wrap_always, wrap_onspace, wrap_onspace_strict):
        print("Wrapping function: %s(x,width=%d)\n" % (wrapper.__name__, width))

        print(
            indent(
                [labels] + rows,
                has_header=True,
                separate_rows=True,
                prefix="| ",
                postfix=" |",
                wrapfunc=lambda x: wrapper(x, width),
            )
        )

    # output:
    #
    # Without wrapping function
    #
    # First Name | Last Name        | Age | Position
    # -------------------------------------------------------
    # John       | Smith            | 24  | Software Engineer
    # Mary       | Brohowski        | 23  | Sales Manager
    # Aristidis  | Papageorgopoulos | 28  | Senior Reseacher
    #
    # Wrapping function: wrap_always(x,width=10)
    #
    # ----------------------------------------------
    # | First Name | Last Name  | Age | Position   |
    # ----------------------------------------------
    # | John       | Smith      | 24  | Software E |
    # |            |            |     | ngineer    |
    # ----------------------------------------------
    # | Mary       | Brohowski  | 23  | Sales Mana |
    # |            |            |     | ger        |
    # ----------------------------------------------
    # | Aristidis  | Papageorgo | 28  | Senior Res |
    # |            | poulos     |     | eacher     |
    # ----------------------------------------------
    #
    # Wrapping function: wrap_onspace(x,width=10)
    #
    # ---------------------------------------------------
    # | First Name | Last Name        | Age | Position  |
    # ---------------------------------------------------
    # | John       | Smith            | 24  | Software  |
    # |            |                  |     | Engineer  |
    # ---------------------------------------------------
    # | Mary       | Brohowski        | 23  | Sales     |
    # |            |                  |     | Manager   |
    # ---------------------------------------------------
    # | Aristidis  | Papageorgopoulos | 28  | Senior    |
    # |            |                  |     | Reseacher |
    # ---------------------------------------------------
    #
    # Wrapping function: wrap_onspace_strict(x,width=10)
    #
    # ---------------------------------------------
    # | First Name | Last Name  | Age | Position  |
    # ---------------------------------------------
    # | John       | Smith      | 24  | Software  |
    # |            |            |     | Engineer  |
    # ---------------------------------------------
    # | Mary       | Brohowski  | 23  | Sales     |
    # |            |            |     | Manager   |
    # ---------------------------------------------
    # | Aristidis  | Papageorgo | 28  | Senior    |
    # |            | poulos     |     | Reseacher |
    # ---------------------------------------------
0

You can prepare your data and pass it to the real column utility.

Let's assume you have printed data to file /tmp/filename.txt with the tab as a delimeter. Then you can columnize it like this:

import subprocess

result = subprocess.run("cat /tmp/filename.txt | column -N \"col_1,col_2,col_3\" -t -s'\t' -R 2,3", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
print(result.stdout.decode("utf-8"))

As you can see, you can use features of column utility, such as right aligning.

-1

I realize this question is old but I didn't understand Antak's answer and didn't want to use a library so I rolled my own solution.

Solution assumes records is a 2D array, records are all the same length, and that fields are all strings.

def stringifyRecords(records):
    column_widths = [0] * len(records[0])
    for record in records:
        for i, field in enumerate(record):
            width = len(field)
            if width > column_widths[i]: column_widths[i] = width

    s = ""
    for record in records:
        for column_width, field in zip(column_widths, record):
            s += field.ljust(column_width+1)
        s += "\n"

    return s

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