109

Is there a css-only solution to scale an image into a bounding box (keeping aspect-ratio)? This works if the image is bigger than the container:

img {
  max-width: 100%;
  max-height: 100%;
}

Example:

But I want to scale up the image until a dimension is 100% of the container.

  • Do you mean like height: 100% and width: 100% ? do you have a desired dimension you want to reach? otherwise you could also stretch the image and force it to reach those dimensions too. – mikevoermans Apr 3 '12 at 13:42
  • jsfiddle.net/Jp5AQ/7 – jacktheripper Apr 3 '12 at 13:43
  • @mikevoermans Look at my two first examples: I want to strech the image until one of the dimensions is 100% and the other is <=100% – Thomas Guillory Apr 3 '12 at 13:55
  • @jacktheripper Conserving aspect-ratio of course... – Thomas Guillory Apr 3 '12 at 13:59
  • @gryzzly The examples speaks for themselves! If they had looked to the examples, that was obvious. – Thomas Guillory Apr 3 '12 at 14:12

13 Answers 13

91

Note: Even though this is the accepted answer, the answer below is more accurate and is currently supported in all browsers if you have the option of using a background image.

No, there is no CSS only way to do this in both directions. You could add

.fillwidth {
    min-width: 100%;
    height: auto;
}

To the an element to always have it 100% width and automatically scale the height to the aspect ratio, or the inverse:

.fillheight {
    min-height: 100%; 
    width: auto;
}

to always scale to max height and relative width. To do both, you will need to determine if the aspect ratio is higher or lower than it's container, and CSS can't do this.

The reason is that CSS does not know what the page looks like. It sets rules beforehand, but only after that it is that the elements get rendered and you know exactly what sizes and ratios you're dealing with. The only way to detect that is with JavaScript.


Although you're not looking for a JS solution I'll add one anyway if someone might need it. The easiest way to handle this with JavaScript is to add a class based on the difference in ratio. If the width-to-height ratio of the box is greater than that of the image, add the class "fillwidth", else add the class "fillheight".

$('div').each(function() {
  var fillClass = ($(this).height() > $(this).width()) 
    ? 'fillheight'
    : 'fillwidth';
  $(this).find('img').addClass(fillClass);
});
.fillwidth { 
  width: 100%; 
  height: auto; 
}
.fillheight { 
  height: 100%; 
  width: auto; 
}

div {
  border: 1px solid black;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.tower {
  width: 100px;
  height: 200px;
}

.trailer {
  width: 200px;
  height: 100px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="tower">
  <img src="http://placekitten.com/150/150" />
</div>
<div class="trailer">
  <img src="http://placekitten.com/150/150" />
</div>

  • 7
    Actually there is a solution: setting CSS3 background-size to contain. See my answer. – Thomas Guillory Apr 4 '12 at 17:57
  • You're totally right. Even though it's one and a half year later now, I edited my post. – Stephan Muller Sep 17 '13 at 14:01
  • 4
    I'd posit that this is the correct answer for the question asked, which is what's the CSS for the img tag. This is relevant because semantically the img tag is content, the image as background to a div isn't. While some circumstances make this impractical (if you don't know image vs. container ratio), for others it's just right. Thanks. – duncanwilcox Jan 2 '14 at 11:43
164

Thanks to CSS3 there is a solution !

The solution is to put the image as background-image and then set the background-size to contain.

HTML

<div class='bounding-box'>
</div>

CSS

.bounding-box {
  background-image: url(...);
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-size: contain;
}

Test it here: http://www.w3schools.com/cssref/playit.asp?filename=playcss_background-size&preval=contain

Full compatibility with latest browsers: http://caniuse.com/background-img-opts

To align the div in the center, you can use this variation:

.bounding-box {
  background-image: url(...);
  background-size: contain;
  position: absolute;
  background-position: center;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
}
  • 1
    Nice one, although my answer isn't incorrect (you were asking about the img specifically) this is a great solution and I should've thought of that. The only problem is that IE 8 is still so widely used that I wouldn't want to rely on this yet, but nice catch nonetheless. – Stephan Muller Apr 5 '12 at 10:49
  • 6
    Set it to "cover" if you don't want any letterboxing: background-size: contain; – arxpoetica Dec 6 '12 at 16:55
  • 3
    It should be noted that you can inject image URLs with HTML: <div class=image style="background-image: url('/images/foo.jpg');"></div>. All other styles should be applied with CSS. – Andrey Mikhaylov - lolmaus Aug 28 '13 at 19:09
  • 12
    I would say this is a terrible approach. By changing it to a background-image, you're removing the semantic meaning of the image in the HTML. – animuson Sep 6 '13 at 0:16
  • 14
    @animuson: It still helped me as I'm using HTML/CSS for printed reports, and couldn't give a quack about semantics :) – Christian Wattengård Jan 7 '14 at 11:46
35

Here's a hackish solution I discovered:

#image {
    max-width: 10%;
    max-height: 10%;
    transform: scale(10);
}

This will enlarge the image tenfold, but restrict it to 10% of its final size - thus bounding it to the container.

Unlike the background-image solution, this will also work with <video> elements.

  • 1
    I love this solution. Not only does it actually answer the question (I know, what a thought), it works beautifully in all modern browsers without having to resort to Javascript! – ndm13 Dec 2 '14 at 0:25
  • 1
    I'd love to see a fiddle of that. In my test of placing an img in a 400x400 container the img just gets cropped in the corner – cyberwombat Apr 11 '15 at 18:45
  • 3
    Nice answer! @Yashua You need to add transform-origin: top left to stop the cropping. /Zombie – XwipeoutX Jun 15 '15 at 1:36
  • Brilliant. My only concern would be a possible loss of image quality in a poorly-coded browser, but in theory it should work fine! – Codemonkey Feb 23 '16 at 22:38
  • Interesting, but doesn't work on Chrome. Results in a cropped row of the image. – MattK Jul 3 '16 at 14:21
22

Today, just say object-fit: contain. Support is everything but IE: http://caniuse.com/#feat=object-fit

  • 3
    IE only has about 16% market share now at the time of writing this (09/12/2016 10:56am) and continues to dwindle, so this is best answer for me :D – Zhang Dec 9 '16 at 2:56
  • 8
    Don't edit other people's answers to fix things other than typos or broken links. I wouldn't say something childish like "There is a polyfill for crap browsers" in an SO answer, and I don't appreciate my answer being edited to make it look like I said that. if you want to use your words, put them in your own answer. – Glenn Maynard Dec 18 '16 at 22:01
  • I'd say, that not IE is the problem, but Edge. According to caniuse object-fit is still under development for it. – BairDev Jun 9 '17 at 7:47
  • This should be one of the top-voted answers 2017 and onwards... According to the caniuse link above, 90% of all users globally now use a browser that supports this – fgblomqvist Jul 27 '17 at 13:40
  • I just posted an answer which works with and without object-fit: stackoverflow.com/a/46456673/474031 – gabrielmaldi Sep 27 '17 at 20:28
6

html:

    <div class="container">
      <img class="flowerImg" src="flower.jpg">
    </div>

css:

.container{
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
}


.flowerImg{
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  object-fit: cover;
  /*object-fit: contain;
  object-fit: scale-down;
  object-position: -10% 0;
  object-fit: none;
  object-fit: fill;*/
}
2

Another solution without background image and without the need for a container (though the max sizes of the bounding box must be known):

img{
  max-height: 100px;
  max-width: 100px;
  width: auto;    /* These two are added only for clarity, */
  height: auto;   /* as the default is auto anyway */
}


If a container's use is required, then the max-width and max-height can be set to 100%:

img {
    max-height: 100%;
    max-width: 100%;
    width: auto; /* These two are added only for clarity, */
    height: auto; /* as the default is auto anyway */
}

div.container {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
}

For this you would have something like:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td>Lorem</td>
        <td>Ipsum<br />dolor</td>
        <td>
            <div class="container"><img src="image5.png" /></div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
1

Are you looking to scale upwards but not downwards?

div {
    border: solid 1px green;
    width: 60px;
    height: 70px;
}

div img {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    min-height: 500px;
    min-width: 500px;
    outline: solid 1px red;
}

This however, does not lock aspect-ratio.

  • 4
    Try to be a little more clear with your expectations before down-voting someone's answer. Especially when they've answered your question before you've cleared up your question with edits. – Khan Apr 3 '12 at 13:54
  • 2
    Also, try to be more polite. No one is going to help you if you talk that way. – Misha Reyzlin Apr 3 '12 at 14:07
  • @Artimuz My apologies if I miss-guided you, but it seemed unclear to me that you wished to keep aspect-ratio, which is why I commented on that specifically. Also, you'll notice that I pasted a snippet of your code from the examples. I believe keeping height: auto; will do that for you if you specify a width. – ericosg Apr 3 '12 at 14:09
1

This example to stretch the image proportionally to fit the entire window. An improvisation to the above correct code is to add $( window ).resize(function(){});

function stretchImg(){
    $('div').each(function() {
      ($(this).height() > $(this).find('img').height()) 
        ? $(this).find('img').removeClass('fillwidth').addClass('fillheight')
        : '';
      ($(this).width() > $(this).find('img').width()) 
        ? $(this).find('img').removeClass('fillheight').addClass('fillwidth')
        : '';
    });
}
stretchImg();

$( window ).resize(function() {
    strechImg();
});

There are two if conditions. The first one keeps checking if the image height is less than the div and applies .fillheight class while the next checks for width and applies .fillwidth class. In both cases the other class is removed using .removeClass()

Here is the CSS

.fillwidth { 
   width: 100%;
   max-width: none;
   height: auto; 
}
.fillheight { 
   height: 100vh;
   max-width: none;
   width: auto; 
}

You can replace 100vh by 100% if you want to stretch the image with in a div. This example to stretch the image proportionally to fit the entire window.

  • OP specifically asked for a css-only approach. – Colt McCormack Jan 20 '15 at 21:11
1

You can accomplish this with pure CSS, both for vertically-long and horizontally-long images at the same tame.

Here's a snippet which works in Chrome, Firefox, and Safari (both using object-fit: scale-down, and without using it):

figure {
  margin: 0;
}

.container {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
  width: 80px;
  height: 80px;
  border: 1px solid #aaa;
}

.container_image {
  display: block;
  max-width: 100%;
  max-height: 100%;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
}

.container2_image2 {
  width: 80px;
  height: 80px;
  object-fit: scale-down;
  border: 1px solid #aaa;
}
Without `object-fit: scale-down`:

<br>
<br>

<figure class="container">
  <img class="container_image" src="https://i.imgur.com/EQgexUd.jpg">
</figure>

<br>

<figure class="container">
  <img class="container_image" src="https://i.imgur.com/ptO8pGi.jpg">
</figure>

<br> Using `object-fit: scale-down`:

<br>
<br>

<figure>
  <img class="container2_image2" src="https://i.imgur.com/EQgexUd.jpg">
</figure>

<br>

<figure>
  <img class="container2_image2" src="https://i.imgur.com/ptO8pGi.jpg">
</figure>

0

I have used table to center image inside the box. It keeps aspect ratio and scales image in a way that is totally inside the box. If the image is smaller than the box then it is shown as it is in the center. Below code uses 40px width and 40px height box. (Not quite sure how well it works because I removed it from another more complex code and simplified it little bit)

CSS:

.SmallThumbnailContainer
{
    display: inline-block; position: relative;
    float: left;    
    width: 40px;
    height: 40px;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
    margin: 0px; padding: 0px;
}
.SmallThumbnailContainer { width: 40px; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } 
.SmallThumbnailContainer tr { height: 40px; text-align: center; }
.SmallThumbnailContainer tr td { vertical-align: middle; position: relative; width: 40px;  }
.SmallThumbnailContainer tr td img { overflow: hidden; max-height: 40px; max-width: 40px; vertical-align: middle; margin: -1px -1px 1px -1px; }

HTML:

<table class="SmallThumbnailContainer" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
    <tr><td>
        <img src="thumbnail.jpg" alt="alternative text"/>
    </td></tr>
    </table>
0

The cleanest and simplest way to do this:

First some CSS:

div.image-wrapper {
    height: 230px; /* Suggestive number; pick your own height as desired */
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden; /* This will do the magic */
    width: 300px; /* Pick an appropriate width as desired, unless you already use a grid, in that case use 100% */
}
img {
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    height: auto;
}

The HTML:

<div class="image-wrapper">
  <img src="yourSource.jpg">
</div>

This should do the trick!

0

This helped me:

.img-class {
  width: <img width>;
  height: <img height>;
  content: url('/path/to/img.png');
}

Then on the element (you can use javascript or media queries to add responsiveness):

<div class='img-class' style='transform: scale(X);'></div>

Hope this helps!

-3
.boundingbox {
    width: 400px;
    height: 500px;
    border: 2px solid #F63;
}
img{
    width:400px;
    max-height: 500px;
    height:auto;
}

I'm editing my answer to further explain my soluton as I've got a down vote.

With the styles set as shown above in css, now the following html div will show the image always fit width wise and will adjust hight aspect ratio to width. Thus image will scale to fit a bounding box as asked in the question.

<div class="boundingbox"><img src="image.jpg"/></div>
  • This answer only works when the box is taller than it is wide. – XwipeoutX Jun 15 '15 at 1:33

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