Linked Questions

130
votes
12answers
18k views

What platforms have something other than 8-bit char?

Every now and then, someone on SO points out that char (aka 'byte') isn't necessarily 8 bits. It seems that 8-bit char is almost universal. I would have thought that for mainstream platforms, it is ...
92
votes
7answers
7k views

Is it possible to differentiate between 0 and -0?

I know that the integer values 0 and -0 are essentially the same. But, I am wondering if it is possible to differentiate between them. For example, how do I know if a variable was assigned -0? bool ...
49
votes
18answers
5k views

Why is number of bits always(?) a power of two?

We have 8-bit, 16-bit, 32-bit and 64-bit hardware architectures and operating systems. But not, say, 42-bit or 69-bit ones. Why? Is it something fundamental that makes 2^n bits a better choice, or is ...
96
votes
4answers
34k views

What is uint_fast32_t and why should it be used instead of the regular int and uint32_t?

So the reason for typedef:ed primitive data types is to abstract the low-level representation and make it easier to comprehend (uint64_t instead of long long type, which is 8 bytes). However, there ...
46
votes
6answers
4k views

Does integer overflow cause undefined behavior because of memory corruption?

I recently read that signed integer overflow in C and C++ causes undefined behavior: If during the evaluation of an expression, the result is not mathematically defined or not in the range of ...
48
votes
5answers
11k views

Is there any reason not to use fixed width integer types (e.g. uint8_t)?

Assuming you're using a compiler that supports C99 (or even just stdint.h), is there any reason not to use fixed width integer types such as uint8_t? One reason that I'm aware of is that it makes ...
38
votes
7answers
3k views

Why does the C++ standard algorithm “count” return a difference_type instead of size_t?

Why is the return type of std::count the difference_type of the iterators (often a ptrdiff_t). Since count can never be negative, isn't size_t technically the right choice? And what if the count ...
24
votes
7answers
737 views

List of platforms supported by the C standard

Does anyone know of any platforms supported by the C standard, for which there is still active development work, but which are: not 2's complement or the integer width is not 32 bits or 64 bits or ...
25
votes
3answers
2k views

Why sizeof built in types except char is compiler dependent in C & C++?

Why are fundamental types in C and C++ not strictly defined like in Java where an int is always 4 bytes and long is 8 bytes, etc. To my knowledge in C and C++ only a char is defined as 1 byte and ...
30
votes
5answers
6k views

Do any real-world CPUs not use IEEE 754?

I'm optimizing a sorting function for a numerics/statistics library based on the assumption that, after filtering out any NaNs and doing a little bit twiddling, floats can be compared as 32-bit ints ...
23
votes
6answers
2k views

Is it safe to assume floating point is represented using IEEE754 floats in C?

Floating point is implementation defined in the C. So there isn't any guarantees. Our code needs to be portable, we are discussing whether or not acceptable to use IEEE754 floats in our protocol. For ...
17
votes
5answers
60k views

Convert big endian to little endian when reading from a binary file [duplicate]

I've been looking around how to convert big-endian to little-endians. But I didn't find any good that could solve my problem. It seem to be there's many way you can do this conversion. Anyway this ...
39
votes
2answers
3k views

Are there any non-twos-complement implementations of C?

As we all no doubt know, the ISO C standard (and C++ as well, I think, though I'm more interested on the C side) allows three underlying representations of signed numbers: two's complement; ones' ...
17
votes
4answers
1k views

%p format specifier needs explicit cast to void* for all types but char* in printf

I've read a lot of answers about the %p format specifier usage in C language here in Stack Overflow, but none seems to give an explanation as to why explicit cast to void* is needed for all types but ...
10
votes
6answers
21k views

Why do C compilers specify long to be 32-bit and long long to be 64-bit?

Wouldn't it have made more sense to make long 64-bit and reserve long long until 128-bit numbers become a reality?

15 30 50 per page