Linked Questions

129
votes
8answers
232k views

Difference between signed / unsigned char [duplicate]

So I know that the difference between a signed and unsigned int is that a bit is used to signify if the number if positive or negative, but how does this apply to a char? How can a character be ...
0
votes
1answer
7k views

What is signed char? [duplicate]

I understand what signed and unsigned int means.But a signed char doesn't make any sense to me. Also why both signed and unsigned int occupies the same amount of space. Signed int should occupy more ...
0
votes
3answers
116 views

What is difference between signed char and char in C language? [duplicate]

I have seen in my legacy embedded code that people are using signed char as return type. What's the need to put signed there? Isn't that implicit that char is nothing but signed char.
0
votes
0answers
109 views

How come (int) '\xNN' is not equal to 0xNN? [duplicate]

I clearly don't understand something about cpp (int) '\x89' gives -119, but i was expecting 137 or 0x89. how can i get for the second byte in "~\x89"? (or how should i format my string so that i ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Output of a signed char [duplicate]

I have the following code: unsigned char i = -1; printf("%d\n", i); The output is 255 I dont understand why
26
votes
3answers
13k views

Difference between char and signed char in c++?

Consider the following code : #include <iostream> #include <type_traits> int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { std::cout<<"std::is_same<int, int>::value = "<<std::...
18
votes
5answers
35k views

C++ type unsigned long int

Is unsigned long int equivlant to unsigned long ? in C++ In my opinion they are same. But I saw some people still using unsigned long int in code. Don't understand why? Could anybody explain it for ...
16
votes
3answers
12k views

Cout not printing number

Issue I'm getting no output from a simple cout, whereas a printf will always print the number: std::cout << variableuint8; // prints nothing printf("%u", variableuint8); // prints the number ...
5
votes
5answers
9k views

Why I can't declare unsigned char* test = “Some text”

This isn't working in visual studio 2010 , it gives me the following error void main (void) { unsigned char* test = "ATGST"; } Edit 1: My question is why this works on Embedded systems, but ...
3
votes
4answers
17k views

Which datatype is used for unsigned char in C#?

I have a c++ application. In that application one of the function is returning unsigned char value. I want to convert that function into C# code. But, I don't have enough knowledge about c++ ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

SQLite C/C++ API unsigned char *

Why does the SQLite C/C++ API return unsigned char *s for text values as opposed to the more de-facto char * type? This is somewhat related to the unsigned char question, except that the SQLite API's ...
0
votes
6answers
1k views

how many times will an unsigned Char loop run

I'm a noob at C/C++ So excuse the simplicity of the question, but here goes unsigned char i; for (i=0; i<1000; ++i) if ((i%4) == 0) printf("hello\n"); how many times will the code print "...
6
votes
5answers
900 views

Can Aliasing Problems be Avoided with const Variables

My company uses a messaging server which gets a message into a const char* and then casts it to the message type. I've become concerned about this after asking this question. I'm not aware of any bad ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Whats the working difference between a signed char pointer and an unsigned one?

I can understand the difference between a signed char and an unsigned one. But dont the pointers of the corresponding type equivalent in their operation? Cos sizeof(char) and sizeof(unsigned char) is ...
3
votes
9answers
611 views

Simple Character Interpretation In C

Here is my code #include<stdio.h> void main() { char ch = 129; printf("%d", ch); } I get the output as -127. What does it mean?

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