Questions tagged [applicative]

In Haskell, Applicative functors are functors such that two functorial values can be combined into one, whilst the two values inside are combined via a functional application. An applicative functor has more structure than a functor but less than a monad.

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How to combine two composed applicative functors?

I have two composed applicative functors Maybe [Integer] and want to combine them with <$>/<*> but I am stuck with applying the applicative operation. The following does not typecheck: (&...
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Does liftA2 preserve associativity?

Given an operation (??) such that (a ?? b) ?? c = a ?? (b ?? c) (that is to say (??) is associative) must it be the case that liftA2 (??) (liftA2 (??) a b) c = liftA2 (??) a (liftA2 (??) b c) (...
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Best way to apply arguments of mixed, possibly Applicative, types to a function

I'm fairly new to Haskell and functional programming and I have recently been learning about Functors, Applicatives and Monads. While I seem to understand the basics, I have trouble figuring out the ...
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Can a Functor / Applicative be tied to one specific type or structure?

I’m trying to understand the applicative typeclass, and in particular the <*> function. Now I see its type signature is f (a -> b) -> f a -> f b and I take it that f is a functor, ...
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An alternative Alternative for lists

A few times now, I've found myself defining: (<?>) :: [a] -> [a] -> [a] [] <?> ys = ys xs <?> _ = xs This is an associative operation, of course, and the empty list [] is ...
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Where to use `ApplicativeError` instead of `Either`?

There is ApplicativeError[F,E] + F[A] and there is Either[E, A]. Both convey the message that the function could fail with an E or succeed with an A but I'm not sure about the different message they ...
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Does the Applicative interface provide power beyond the ability to lift multi-argument functions (in curried form) into a Functor?

Applicatives are often presented as a way to lift multi-argument functions into a functor and apply functor values to it. But I wonder if there is some subtle additional power stemming from the fact ...
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how to use applicative validation using languageext?

I am trying to port an example using applicative validation with the teaching-lib LaYumba to LanguageExt. Here is the LaYumba Code (works as expected): using System; using System.Linq; using ...
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Can Haskell Typeclasses be Partially Implemented?

I want to make a pair type to represent modular arithmetic. I made its constructor {- LANGUAGE GADTs -} data Zn e where Zn :: Integer -> Integer -> Zn Integer because I would like to be ...
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What does “f (a -> b)” type signature mean in Haskell?

I'm trying to understand applicatives in Haskell. Can't figure out what does following type signature mean: f (a -> b) For example: foo :: Num a => Maybe (a -> a) foo = Just (+1) How can ...
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1answer
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How to get Haskell to recognize functions as applicative functors

I'm new to Haskell and still don't understand how to deal with their type system. My problem is that I'm playing around with the sequenceA function from the book Learn You a Haskell For Great Good. ...
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Inductive lifting

I would like to combine the various lifts into a single class class Lift a b where lift :: a -> b So that lift can be used in place of fmap, liftA2, liftA3, etc. Now it is easy enough to write ...
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How can (<*) be implemented optimally for sequences?

The Applicative instance for Data.Sequence generally performs very well. Almost all the methods are incrementally asymptotically optimal in time and space. That is, given fully forced/realized inputs, ...
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The definition for (<*) and (*>)

Can I assume that the below is true for all applicatives ? f1 <* f2 = fmap const f1 <*> f2 and f1 *> f2 = fmap (flip const ) f1 <*> f2
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ignore :: Applicative f => f a -> f ()

I need any function with this signature : ignore :: Applicative f => f a -> f () Can someone point me to the right direction ? Thanks!
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Applicative for a user defined type

I'm trying to write Applicative for this type data Choice a = ColumnA a | ColumnB a I wrote a Functor instance: instance Functor Choice where fmap f (ColumnA a ) = (ColumnA (f a) ) fmap f (...
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Are all fixed size containers strong monoidal functors, and/or vice versa?

The Applicative typeclass represents lax monoidal functors that preserve the cartesian monoidal structure on the category of typed functions. In other words, given the canonical isomorphisms ...
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Weird behaviour of pure from Applicative in GHCi

I am reading the excellent article Understanding map and apply by Scott Wlaschin and running some Haskell code to understand the concepts (Functor, Applicative, ...). I stumbled upon a behaviour I do ...
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Haskell - applying a function that returns a functor onto a functor

Say I have function two functions f and g that both take in regular values and return an Either value like so: g :: a -> Either x b f :: b -> Either x c How do I chain the two together to get ...
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When should one use applicatives over monads?

I’ve been using Scala at work and to understand Functional Programming more deeply I picked Graham Hutton’s Programming in Haskell (love it :) In the chapter on Monads I got my first look into the ...
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The need for pure in Applicatives

I'm learning Haskell's Applicatives. It seems to me (I'm probably wrong) that the pure function is not really needed, for example: pure (+) <*> [1,2,3] <*> [3,4,5] can be written as (+...
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Cascading Parsers in Haskell

My parser type is newtype Parser a = Parser { parse :: String -> Maybe (a,String) } I have two parsers : 1) a = (satisfy isAlpha) that knows how to match the first alpha numeric character in a ...
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1answer
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The <* syntax in Haskell

I'm given the following code newtype Parser a = Parser { parse :: String -> Maybe (a,String) } instance Applicative Parser where pure a = Parser $ \s -> Just (a,s) f <*> a = ...
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Combining parsers in Haskell

I'm given the following parsers newtype Parser a = Parser { parse :: String -> Maybe (a,String) } instance Functor Parser where fmap f p = Parser $ \s -> (\(a,c) -> (f a, c)) <$> ...
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Are the liftM functions deprived of their monadic essence?

The difference between monad and applicative is that the former can choose the next computation depending on a previous result: (\x -> if x == 1 then (\_ -> []) else (\y -> (\z -> \w ->...
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How to make a proper “pure” for an Applicative instance?

I've found out that there are at least 2 realizations of pure for this Applicative instance, that follow all the laws (Identity, Homomorphism, Interchange, Composition). Is one of them still wrong? ...
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Why does mutual yielding makes ArrowApply and Monads equivalent, unlike Arrow and Applicative?

Here's the SO post I'm going to refer to. Also, I'm going to use the same snippets as the OP in that question in order not to separate the materials. It is widely known that an ArrowApply instance ...
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Applicatives: <$> vs. pure and <*>

After trying out examples for a while, to me it looks like myFunction <$> and pure myFunction <*> are equivalent when working on the Control.Applicative type class. Example: (++) <$&...
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1answer
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How do the requirements for the instances of the Applicative type class relate to their implementations for Functor [duplicate]

According to Haskell's library documentation, every instance of the Applicative class must satisfy the four rules: identity: pure id <*> v = v composition: pure (.) <*> u <*> v <*...
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Applicative functor laws violation

Excersize from an online course. Suppose, that for a standard list Applicative functor the <*> operator is defined in a standard way, while pure is changed to pure x = [x,x] What laws of ...
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1answer
66 views

Couldn't match type ‘a’ with ‘b’error in Monad instance definition

I'm writing a haskell program to execute a bunch of statements to modify a data record. I would like to make modifications and tests to the state at each statement without user intervention. I had the ...
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How to flatMap cats Applicatives

I've started learning functional programming with Cats and I stuck with flatMapping (merging) applicatives F[List]. What is very simple in pure Scala is flatmapping list of lists like that: val ...
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1answer
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How do you define the monad instance for the following data types?

Here's the code I have to work with: infixl 9 :@: -- This is newly defined symbol used in the application of expressions data Expr = Lit Integer -- a literal | Var String -- a ...
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What does the Naturality law for Traversables mean?

The Naturality law states that: t . traverse f == traverse (t . f) -- for every applicative transformer t Now for the RHS of the law, if f has the type Applicative a => x -> a y, then t has to ...
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How to define (*>), (<*) in terms of (<*>) and pure?

I can define them using monads. (<*) :: Monad m => m a -> m b -> m a (<*) fa fb = fa >>= \a -> (fb >>= \_ -> return a) (<*) fa fb = ??? -- In terms of pure & (&...
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How to define apply in terms of bind?

In Haskell Applicatives are considered stronger than Functor that means we can define Functor using Applicative like -- Functor fmap :: (a -> b) -> f a -> f b fmap f fa = pure f <*> fa ...
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Looking for a Haskell function related to liftA2, but works like <|> from Alternative

Consider this liftA2 function: liftA2 :: (a -> b -> c) -> Maybe a -> Maybe b -> Maybe c liftA2 f Nothing Nothing = Nothing liftA2 f (Just x) Nothing = Nothing liftA2 f Nothing (...
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2answers
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In Haskell why Applicatives need to take morphisms and data in same Context?

I am new to Haskell. This may be stupid question. As the Applicative typeclass has apply function that takes the functions and data in the same context. Why can't it be different and be more generic. ...
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1answer
133 views

Applicative parser stuck in infinite loop

I'm trying to implement my own Applicative parser, here's the code I use: {-# LANGUAGE ApplicativeDo, LambdaCase #-} module Parser where -- Implementation of an Applicative Parser import Data.Char ...
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Implement Applicative for custom ZipList

This comes from an exercise in book Haskell from First Principles. The exercise is to implement Applicative for ZipList', which is analogous to the Prelude's ZipList. The book has this hint Check ...
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Can I invert Applicative?

Thereto. It is folklore that we can have a monoidal functor in Haskell. For example, I can offer this definition: class Functor f => Monoidal f where coherence :: (f a, f b) -> f (a, b) ...
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How to make instance of Applicative a certain data type

I'm reading Graham Hutton book on Haskell, and don't no how to proceed in one part of an excercise. The excercise says as follows: Given the following type expressions data Expr a = Var a | Val Int |...
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Why does a “let” statement force an “applicative do” block into requiring a monad constraint?

Consider this example: {-# language ApplicativeDo #-} module X where data Tuple a b = Tuple a b deriving Show instance Functor (Tuple a) where fmap f (Tuple x y) = Tuple x (f y) instance ...
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how to run an arbitrary number of generations in the bunny invasion problem

I'm working through a problem in the haskell wikibook and am totally stuck. They ask to "Generalize the bunny invasion example in the list monad chapter for an arbitrary number of generations." The ...
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Composing Applicatives

I'm reading through Chapter 25 (Composing Types) of the haskellbook, and wish to understand applicative composition more completely The author provides a type to embody type composition: newtype ...
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How do I map functions over a RoseTree in Applicative (Haskell)?

How do I apply applicative to a RoseTree, i.e. return a tree composed of trees created by the successive application of functions to initial nodes. Here's the code that I have written: {-# LANGUAGE ...
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1answer
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Applicative functors. Type signatures of <*> and <$> in detail

We have signatures: (<$>) :: Functor f => (a -> b) -> f a -> f b (<*>) :: Applicative f => f (a -> b) -> f a -> f b Let us play with it a bit: (/) <$&...
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Why managing data integrity at the applicative level? Since we can do it at the database level? Why avoid constraints at the database level? [closed]

One of my professor said: "If we consider that, if constraints are sometimes completely avoided and therefore not defined in some database of some project, it is only at the application level that we ...
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What is the best way to realize `(->) ((->) a b)` as an applicative functor?

I'm working on Problem 19 in Ninety-Nine Haskell Problems, and I've encountered the following difficulty. The problem asks to "rotate a list N places to the left." This could easily be achieved in a ...
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Proving equivalence of sequence definitions from Applicative and Monad

How can I properly prove that sequenceA :: (Traversable t, Applicative f) => t (f a) -> f (t a) sequenceA [] = pure [] sequenceA (x:xs) = pure (:) <*> x <*> sequenceA xs is ...

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