Questions tagged [spaceship-operator]

The <=> comparison operator is often referred to as the spaceship operator. It performs a 3-way comparison (returning less, equal, or greater) on the two operands.

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How does spaceship gets the #id value for .cer files from Apple Developer Portal?

I have the .cer certificate that is downloaded from Apple Developer Portal of the client I don't have authentication for. I am running openssl x509 to read the .cer which doesn't shows any value that ...
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Real world usage example for spaceship operator [closed]

The definition of spaceship operator is meant to have a strong definition of ordering, but does this affect the way your client code or just how to define your class comparison operators? Since in ...
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How to sort a multidimensional array by two values using spaceship operator?

I am trying to sort a multidimensional array using spaceship operator. <?php $my_array = [ ['name'=>'cool', 'volume'=> 2, 'page'=>1], ['name'=>'sonic', 'volume'=> 1, '...
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Three-way comparison operator member vs non-member implementation

Two-way comparison operators should be non-members functions if: you want the first operand to be of a type that is not this class you want implicit type conversion any of the two operands The new C+...
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How to make an operator that is like Ruby <=> (a.k.a.: spaceship)

I have a sample code below that is made with swift and using <=> ,I want to convert it to android but I have no clue how to do.I want to convert the following sample to android with java. Some ...
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Perl lexer: why does “<=>” eq “=” in the context of <=><=><=>?

I was just reading the secret pseudo-constants, namely the Space fleet constant <=><=><=> Space fleet 0 This seems to be because the outer <=> is doing ...
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Sorting arrays in opposite order in Rby

I'm new to Ruby and need a piece of code to be explained to me. The array to be sorted is this one: books = ["Charlie and the Chocolate Factory", "War and Peace", "Utopia", "A Brief History of Time",...
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Practical meaning of strong_ordering and weak_ordering

I've been reading a bit about C++20's consistent comparison (i.e. operator<=>) but couldn't understand what's the practical difference between strong_ordering and weak_ordering (same goes for ...
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Why do we need the spaceship <=> operator in C++?

Why do we need such an operator in C++ and how is it useful in modern C++ programming? Any real world code examples where this can be applied will help. This question is geared to understand the ...
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Legitimate appearances of <=> in pre-c++20 code

Messing around in wandbox I discovered that clang will actually issue a warning if it sees <=> appear in C++17 or earlier. warning: '<=>' is a single token in C++2a; add a space to avoid ...
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Spaceship Operator [duplicate]

I have a PHP page that I use to perform some tasks. This page reloads every minute. Along with this page it works in conjunction with two other pages and a database. The other two pages display ...
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Trouble creating my own bubble sort method for an Array class

I completely understand how a bubble sort works. It's just I have been given a coding exercise where I have to create a method that's monkey patched to the Array class where a block of code is used ...
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Is the three-way comparison operator always efficient?

Herb Sutter, in his proposal for the "spaceship" operator (section 2.2.2, bottom of page 12), says: Basing everything on <=> and its return type: This model has major advantages, some unique ...
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How is the three-way comparison operator different from subtraction?

There's a new comparison operator <=> in C++20. However I think in most cases a simple subtraction works well: int my_strcmp(const char *a, const char *b) { while (*a == *b && *a != ...
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What does “compares less than 0” mean?

Context While I was reading Consistent comparison, I have noticed a peculiar usage of the verb to compare: There’s a new three-way comparison operator, <=>. The expression a <=> b returns ...
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How and why did the ISO C++ Standards Committee (WG21) decide to accept the proposal for a spaceship operator as it is? [closed]

In a recently published paper [1], Herb Sutter et al. describe an extension of the programming language C++ by a three way comparison operator. The authors refer to a considerable number of earlier ...
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What is the <=> operator in C++?

While I was trying to learn about C++ operators, I stumbled upon a strange comparison operator on cppreference.com,* in a table that looked like this: "Well, if these are common operators in C++, I ...
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1answer
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Implementing operator<=> for optional<T>

With operator<=> being added into C++20, I wanted to try to reason about how to implement this operator for those cases where it's not a simple member-wise comparison. How would you implement ...
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Sort objects in array by 2 attributes in Ruby with the spaceship operator

I have a SizeMatters class that creates an object from a given string. In order to sort these objects in an array, I've implemented the <=>(other) method. But the following code only helps the ...
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Is there any use of ruby combined comparison operator/spaceship operator other than in sorting?

Ruby's combined comparison operator, or spaceship operator, is used in sorting. I used this operator with sort function, and cannot understand the mechanism of this operator. Are there any other uses ...
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How operator <=> compare the objects?

In the RFC given this example: // only values are compared $a = (object) ["a" => "b"]; $b = (object) ["b" => "b"]; echo $a <=> $b; // 0 But when I execute it I get 1 as output back: $...
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Combined Comparison / “Spaceship” Operator (<=>) in Javascript?

Ruby has something called a Combined Comparison or "Spaceship" Operator, it looks like this: <=> It does the following: a <=> b := if a < b then return -1 if a = b then return ...
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How does PHP's spaceship operator <=> handle incomparable operands?

There will be the spaceship operator added in PHP 7. I am not sure about how it works in some edge cases. $a <=> $b will return: 1 if $a > $b 0 if $a == $b -1 if $a < $b What will happen ...
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What is <=> (the 'Spaceship' Operator) in PHP 7? [duplicate]

PHP 7, which will come out in November this year will introduce the Spaceship (<=>) operator. What is it and how does it work? This question already has an answer in our general reference question ...
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How will comparison operators (spaceship operator) be handled in ternary operators

This question is a little preemptive, as php 7 is not even released yet. I'm curious how the spaceship operator will be handled in the context of ternary operators. so if I have a pre-spaceship ...
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1answer
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What actually happens when Spaceship operator is overwritten in Ruby?

I am new to Ruby. Can someone kindly explain how the <=> method works in the following program. How is the 'other' parameter being used below? class Age attr_reader :value def initialize(...
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Spaceship operator and conditional statements

Quick question. Is there more elegant way to write something like this? result = a <=> b if result == 1 # do something elsif result == 0 # do something else else # do something else end
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ruby's <=> operator and sort method

player1 = Player.new("moe") player2 = Player.new("larry",60) player3 = Player.new("curly", 125) @players = [player1, player2, player3] Above, I created some player objects and added them to the ...
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alternative to combined comparison operator (<=>) in .sort

I know that if I want to sort an array in descending order I have to do the following: array.sort!{|a,b| b <=> a} However, if I want to avoid using the "spaceship" (<=>) operator, I would ...
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Does Swift have a spaceship operator <=>, and if not how would a custom operator be created?

From Wikipedia: Unlike traditional equality operators, which will return true or false depending on whether the arguments are equal or unequal, the spaceship operator will return 1, 0, or −1 ...
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What is this operator <=> in MySQL?

I'm working on code written by a previous developer and in a query it says, WHERE p.name <=> NULL What does <=> mean in this query? Is it something equal to =? Or is it a syntax error? ...
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How do I call the superclass comparator (spaceship) method in Ruby?

I'm trying to a comparator for a class without rewriting the comparison logic from the superclass, but for some reason I cannot get the return value from the superclass comparator. This issue can be ...
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How do I chain groovy's spaceship operator for multilevel sorting?

Groovy has the spaceship operator <=> which provides an easy way to implement comparisons. How can I chain it in a groovier way then the code below? In this example I want to compare the items ...
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Ruby sort - why rspec error when “expected: [7, 6, 5, 5, 4, 3, 3]” seems the same as “got: [7, 6, 5, 5, 4, 3, 3]”? [closed]

Result: Failures: 1) An usual sorter sorts downwards by default Failure/Error: [a,b,c,d,e,f,g].sort.should == [7,6,5,5,4,3,3] expected: [7, 6, 5, 5, 4, 3, 3] got: [7, 6, 5, ...
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What is the name of the <=> operator in Ruby? What do they call it?

In Ruby there is the <=> operator. In the API they do not name its name, just: The class must define the <=> operator... Comparable uses <=> to implement the conventional ...
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Why doesn't sort or the spaceship (flying saucer) operator (<=>) work on booleans in Ruby?

In "Is it possible to sort a list of objects depending on if the individual object's response to a method?", I discovered that the flying saucer doesn't work on booleans. Consider: Ruby 1.8.7: [...
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Difference between <=> and == in Ruby?

What are their differences? Coming from a Java background, it does seem to me <=> is the same as Java's equals(), while == is for direct reference comparison. Is this right?
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Why does the spaceship operator have only one equal sign in it?

Why was the spaceship operator <=> chosen to have one equal sign rather than two? Is this seen as inconsistent with one equal sign usually meaning assignment, and two meaning comparison?
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What is the meaning of '<==>' in Ruby? [duplicate]

What is the meaning of '<==>' in Ruby? Example: The code comes from the following class that compares numbers in the format x.x.x, def <==>(other) # Some code here end The following ...
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Confused with Ruby's <=> operator

I am confused with Ruby's <=> operator. How does it differ from == or ===? Any comprehensive examples/use case? Thanks.
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Overriding Ruby's spaceship operator <=>

I am trying to override Ruby's <=> (spaceship) operator to sort apples and oranges so that apples come first sorted by weight, and oranges second, sorted by sweetness. Like so: module Fruity ...
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Sorting only using the less-than operator compared to a trivalue compare function

In C++/STL sorting is done by using only the less-than operator. Altough I have no idea how the sorting algorithms are actually implemented, I assume that the other operations are created implicite: ...
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When is the spaceship operator used outside a sort?

This is a best practice question. I've only seen the Perl spaceship operator (<=>) used in numeric sort routines. But it seems useful in other situations. I just can't think of a practical use. ...
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Impementation of the Ruby <=> Combinator

Not infrequently, one wants to implement the <=> (comparison, or "spaceship") operator on a product data type, i.e., a class with multiple fields (all of which (we hope!) already have <=> ...
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What is the Ruby <=> (spaceship) operator?

What is the Ruby <=> (spaceship) operator? Is the operator implemented by any other languages?