Questions tagged [spaceship-operator]

The <=> comparison operator is often referred to as the spaceship operator. It performs a 3-way comparison (returning less, equal, or greater) on the two operands.

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Which equality/comparison operators are synthesized for heterogeneous spaceship operator definitions? [duplicate]

C++20 introduced the new spaceship operator <=> which allows for synthesizing equality and comparison operators based on the strength of the ordering of the three-way comparison. However, it ...
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Nested generation of comparison operator with three-way operator?

Consider the following two overload operator<=> for S: #include <compare> struct S {}; int operator<=>(S, int) { return 0; } #1 S operator<=>(S, S) { return {}; } #2 If ...
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Three-way operator <=> return struct with implicit conversion function

Consider the following useless code: struct S{ constexpr operator int() const { return 0; } constexpr auto operator<=>(S) const { return *this; } }; static_assert(S{} <= S{}); Clang and ...
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More silent behaviour changes with C++20 three-way comparison

To my surprise, I ran into another snag like C++20 behaviour breaking existing code with equality operator?. Consider a simple case-insensitive key type, to be used with, e.g., std::set or std::map: //...
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Why do empty structs in C++20 do not have implicit spaceship operator?

Motivation: sometimes I use std::variant to implement "fancy" enum where some enum states can carry state. Now if I want to use the <=> for my variant it requires that my empty structs ...
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Why does spaceship allow mixed comparisons (different template instantiations) with nonsense results?

EDIT: This has nothing to do with spaceship. It is just that the use of spaceship obfuscated the real issue in my code (see answer for details). I was surprised by the output of this program: (If you ...
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Why does std::tuple call operator <=> twice?

The following code calls operator <=> twice, with arguments reversed. But why? GCC 10.2 and clang 12 both seem to be using libstdc++-10, whose <tuple> does provide operator <=>, so ...
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MSVC's standard library does not define spaceship operator for std::string, std::shared_ptr, and so?

I'm trying to make my program multi-platform, originally written for Linux. MSVC (I'm using 19.28) is told to have spaceship operator support from version 19.20 (https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/...
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Ambiguous Overloaded Operator C++20

I'm trying to test my project in the latest Visual Studio and Clang versions. One of the errors that pops up is related to an ambiguous operator (with reversed parameter order). This does not seem to ...
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1answer
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Inherited synthesized comparison operator produces warning/error: ISO C++20 considers use of overloaded operator '!='

In the following code snippet clang 11.0.1 generates a warning template <class T> struct iterator_facade { template<class S> bool operator==(const S &other) const noexcept {...
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1answer
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Performance problems with the C++20 spaceship operator?

Since C++20 the standard library uses the spaceship operator to implement comparison for strings and vectors (according to this video). I am worried that this comes with a potentially huge performance ...
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C++20 behaviour breaking existing code with equality operator?

I ran into this while debugging this question. I trimmed it down all the way to just using Boost Operators: Compiler Explorer C++17 C++20 #include <boost/operators.hpp> struct F : boost::...
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Why doesn't the spaceship operator allow me to perform an equality operation but allow inequality operations? [duplicate]

Does anyone know why I’m getting a compiler error for the equality operation on a class that has a 3 way operator override? I'm using VS 2019. class Rectangle { public: constexpr Rectangle(const ...
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How to write custom spaceship operator in c++20 [duplicate]

I don't understand why this code doesn't compile. According to some websites, a == b should be rewritten as a.operator<=>(b) == 0, however both clang and gcc fail to compile. #include <...
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1answer
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Checking for three-way-comparison operator support at compile time

I'd like to conditionally enable operator <=> overloads in my code depending on whether or not it is supported given the current version of the compiler and its command line options. For example,...
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2answers
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generate == operator that uses non-defaulted <=>

In a slight variation of this question. I would like to define a custom type with a custom <=> operator and use that custom <=> operator to generate a ==. Trying the following #include <...
2
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1answer
102 views

Why is there an `equivalent` value for std::strong_ordering?

The valid values of std::strong_ordering are less, equal, equivalent, and greater. However, it appears that strong_ordering::equivalent and strong_ordering::equal are equal (i.e., interchangeable), ...
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Three-way comparison operator with inconsistent ordering deduction

Some time ago I defined my first three-way comparison operator. It compared a single type and replaced multiple conventional operators. Great feature. Then I tried to implement a similar operator for ...
18
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1answer
569 views

Three-way comparison and constexpr function template: which compiler is right?

Consider: #include <compare> template<class=void> constexpr int f() { return 1; } unsigned int x; using T = decltype(x <=> f()); GCC and MSVC accept the declaration of T. Clang ...
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Rewritten comparison operators and expression templates

I have a finite volume library, strongly influenced by openfoam, which enables the solution to continuum mechanics problems to be written in C++ similarly as one would in paper. For example, to solve ...
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C++20: Automatically generated operators are unreferencable in derived classes?

I noticed something rather strange while writing C++20 related to spaceship operators. As I understand, since C++20, comparison operators are automatically generated by the compiler. However, I have ...
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What will be the type after Three-way comparison C++20 [closed]

When using three-way comparison in C++20, like: type1 foo = Value1; type2 bar = Value2; auto res = foo <=> bar ; For what type of type1 and type2 the res's type will be std::weak_ordering ,...
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Is there a std::less/std::greater for the spaceship operator?

All the basic comparisons (<, <=, ==, !=, >=, >) have an associated function object (std::less, std::less_equal, std::equal_to, std::not_equal_to, std::greater_equal, std::greater). Does ...
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What does comparing the result of the three-way comparison operator with nullptr do?

Given the example from cppreference on <=>, we can simplify the example code to: struct person { std::string name; std::string surname; auto operator <=> (const person& p) ...
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C++ template class error with operator '<=>' (error C2678)

I'm attempting to make a treap class in C++. I have the .h and .cpp files for this class, as well as a test class. My 'add' method gives me the following error when I attempt to build it: "error C2678:...
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Trying to use spaceship operator in derived classes

I am trying to use spaceship operator in base class so I would have defined all operator by compilator. (source: https://devblogs.microsoft.com/cppblog/simplify-your-code-with-rocket-science-c20s-...
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187 views

Why do I need to include <compare> header to get <=> to compile?

I know the technical answer is: because the standard says so. But I am confused regarding the motivation: I see nothing "library" in the defaulting the <=>: it may return some type that is ...
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Should the operators == and <=> in C++ 20 be implemented as a member or a free function?

Note: I presume that this is technically duplicate of this question but: changes to == in C++20 are quite radical, and I am not sure if reviving 9 year question is the proper thing to do. I ask ...
3
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1answer
114 views

Check if a type is a partial order

Can a type be checked for partial ordering property in C++20? If so, how can such a check be made with the use of concepts? Is the the following code enough for this purpose? #include <compare>...
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1answer
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Why default three-way operator (spaceship <=>) generates equality operator (==) and user define three-way operator not?

Consider this code: #include <iostream> #include <compare> class A { public: int i = {}; std::strong_ordering operator<=> (A const& r) const { return i <=> r.i;...
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Why does this clang code fail to compile with clang 10 with -std=c++20

Following program fails to compile with clang10 and -std=c++20 #include "clang/AST/ASTContext.h" int main(){} With -std=c++17 it works. This is the compile attempt output(note that I am fine with ...
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How to force std::weak_ordering

While trying out the new Tie-Interceptor three-way comparison operator <=> I was wondering what would be an example such that struct Foo { /* .... */ auto operator<=>(...
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1answer
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Why does global spaceship operator not behave as expected?

#include <compare> #include <forward_list> template<typename T> struct A { std::forward_list<T> l; }; template<typename T> auto operator<=>(const A<T>&...
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1answer
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Why can I invoke == with a defaulted <=> but not a user-provided one?

#include <compare> struct A { int n; auto operator <=>(const A&) const noexcept = default; }; struct B { int n; auto operator <=>(const B& rhs) const ...
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1answer
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Why have comparison operators been removed from standard library containers in C++ 20?

I was browsing cppreference and saw that vector's comparison operations have been removed in C++20, and the spaceship operator (<=>) has been introduced. The same thing can be seen for many ...
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1answer
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How to not execute some php 7 code on php 5.6?

recently i had the necessity of use come code for backward compatibility with PHP 5.6 and i did this using if statement, checking php version for choosing what code execute. This is a little example: ...
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Three way comparison replaces all others comparison operators except ==?

In g++ 10, I am trying to use three way comparison, just for experiment. I read that other operators do not needed anymore (except ==). But even if I can use operator (it is implemented on the ...
3
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1answer
136 views

Three-way comparison of pointer to functions fails

Why can't I compare pointers to functions with GCC trunk? using f_t = int(*)(int); f_t a { nullptr }, b { nullptr }; auto c = a <=> b; int main (){} gives a.cpp:4:13: error: invalid operands ...
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How do you reverse a strong_ordering?

Is there an easier way to achieve the effect of this function? strong_ordering reverse(strong_ordering v) { if (v > 0) return strong_ordering::less; else if (v < 0) ...
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Is there a wrapper for floating point numbers in C++20 that would enable me to default the spaceship operator?

I was watching "Using C++20 three way comparison - Jonathan Müller - Meeting C++ 2019" talk and it mentioned problems with classes that contain floating point members. Problem comes from the fact ...
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non-defaulted operator <=> doesn't generate == and != in C++20

I'm running into a strange behavior with the new spaceship operator <=> in C++20. I'm using Visual Studio 2019 compiler with /std:c++latest. This code compiles fine, as expected: #include <...
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How does spaceship gets the #id value for .cer files from Apple Developer Portal?

I have the .cer certificate that is downloaded from Apple Developer Portal of the client I don't have authentication for. I am running openssl x509 to read the .cer which doesn't shows any value that ...
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Real world usage example for spaceship operator [closed]

The definition of spaceship operator is meant to have a strong definition of ordering, but does this affect the way your client code is written or just how to define your class comparison operators? ...
3
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1answer
286 views

Three-way comparison operator member vs non-member implementation

Two-way comparison operators should be non-members functions if: you want the first operand to be of a type that is not this class you want implicit type conversion any of the two operands The new C+...
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How to make an operator that is like Ruby <=> (a.k.a.: spaceship)

I have a sample code below that is made with swift and using <=> ,I want to convert it to android but I have no clue how to do.I want to convert the following sample to android with java. Some ...
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Perl lexer: why does “<=>” eq “=” in the context of <=><=><=>?

I was just reading the secret pseudo-constants, namely the Space fleet constant <=><=><=> Space fleet 0 This seems to be because the outer <=> is doing ...
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Sorting arrays in opposite order in Rby

I'm new to Ruby and need a piece of code to be explained to me. The array to be sorted is this one: books = ["Charlie and the Chocolate Factory", "War and Peace", "Utopia", "A Brief History of Time",...
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Practical meaning of strong_ordering and weak_ordering

I've been reading a bit about C++20's consistent comparison (i.e. operator<=>) but couldn't understand what's the practical difference between strong_ordering and weak_ordering (same goes for ...
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Why do we need the spaceship <=> operator in C++?

Why do we need such an operator in C++ and how is it useful in modern C++ programming? Any real world code examples where this can be applied will help. This question is geared to understand the ...
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Legitimate appearances of <=> in pre-c++20 code

Messing around in wandbox I discovered that clang will actually issue a warning if it sees <=> appear in C++17 or earlier. warning: '<=>' is a single token in C++2a; add a space to avoid ...