Questions tagged [strict-aliasing]

Strict aliasing is an assumption, made by the C or C++ compiler, that de-referencing pointers to objects of different types will never refer to the same memory location (i.e. they will not alias each other).

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Accessing pointer variable as a pointer to a different type in C

Is it good practice to access a pointer variable by dereferencing a pointer to a pointer, which points to a different type or void? Could this break strict aliasing rules? C and C++ have some ...
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Accessing pointer variable as a pointer to a different type in C++

Is it good practice to access a pointer variable by dereferencing a pointer to a pointer, which points to a different type or void? Could this break strict aliasing rules? C and C++ have some ...
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Which of these pointer comparisons should a conforming compiler be able to optimize to “always false”?

In an attempt to get a better understand of how pointer aliasing invariants manifested during optimization, I plugged some code into the renowned Compiler Explorer, which I'll repeat here: #include &...
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1answer
45 views

Need help to resolve warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer will break strict-aliasing rules

I am working on a set of C code to optimize it. I came across a warning while fixing a broken code. The environment is Linux, C99, compiling with -Wall -O2 flags. Initially a struct text is defined ...
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Does the strict-aliasing rules apply across function calls?

About the example below, in f1, no alias occurs because p(void*) isn't accessible and p1 is the only pointer accessing memory. However, there is a pointer aliasing between p1(float*) and p2(int*) ...
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Clang strict-aliasing optimizations vs unreachable code violating strict-aliasing

I have a question about strict-aliasing and clang optimizations for one example. Let's consider the following example (1): typedef void (*FTy)(void); FTy F = 0; (*F)(); It is an undefined behavior. ...
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2answers
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Aliasing through unions

The 6.5(p7) has a bullet about unions and aggregates: An object shall have its stored value accessed only by an lvalue expression that has one of the following types: [...] — an ...
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Inconsistent strict aliasing rules

I have the following program where I initialize two buffers in a seemingly fast way by casting the 8-bit buffer to 32 and 64-bit values. #include <stdio.h> #include <stdint.h> typedef ...
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Can arrays overlap (alias), or is GCC being overly cautious?

For the following C++ code, GCC 8.3 and Clang 7.0 (both with -O2) generate a call to memmove unless compiling with -DRESTRICT. With -DRESTRICT, faster code is generated (either "rep movsq" or memcpy)....
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Unions, aliasing and type-punning in practice: what works and what does not?

I have a problem understanding what can and cannot be done using unions with GCC. I read the questions (in particular here and here) about it but they focus the C++ standard, I feel there's a mismatch ...
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1answer
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Strict aliasing rule in C

I'm trying to understand strict aliasing rule as defined in 6.5(p6): If a value is stored into an object having no declared type through an lvalue having a type that is not a character type, then ...
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Strict aliasing in flexible array member?

I'm writing an Arena Allocator and it works, but I feel like it violates strict aliasing rules. I want to know if I'm right or wrong. Here's the relevant part of the code: typedef struct ArenaNode ...
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4answers
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Can a type which is a union member alias that union?

Prompted by this question: The C11 standard states that a pointer to a union can be converted to a pointer to each of its members. From Section 6.7.2.1p17: The size of a union is sufficient ...
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Does the following code violate strict aliasing?

Does the following code violate strict aliasing? int a = 0; *((int *)((char *)&a)) = 1; Why not? because we end up dereferencing the pointer of int a using int * which is legit Why yes? because ...
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1answer
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Stricit aliasing violation: Why gcc and clang generate different output?

When the typecasting violates the strict aliasing rule in C and C++, a compiler may optimize in such a way that wrong constant value can be propagated and unaligned access could be allowed, which ...
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1answer
235 views

Has signed/unsigned aliasing rule ever worked as intended?

Here is the rule ([basic.lval]/8) in its C++17 form, but it looks similar in the other standards ("lvalue" instead of "glvalue" in C++98): 8 If a program attempts to access the stored value of an ...
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4answers
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What is the rationale behind the strict aliasing rule?

I am currently wondering about the rationale behind the strict aliasing rule. I understand that certain aliasing is not allowed in C and that the intention is to allow optimizations, but I am ...
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1answer
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Is casting incomplete struct pointers undefined behavior?

I was currently reading about some strict aliasing rules, and I was wondering whether casting a pointer to an incomplete struct is undefined behavior. Example 1: #include <stdlib.h> struct ...
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1answer
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Strict aliasing rules broken with templates and inheritance

The following code gives me warning in gcc that I break strict aliasing rules: struct Base { int field = 2; }; template <typename T> struct Specialization: public Base { void method() { ...
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1answer
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c++ array of templated abstract-base-class without breaking strict-aliasing rule

What is the best way to create an array of objects derived from an abstract template base class without violating the strict-aliasing rule. Each derived object will define the template arguments of ...
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Breaking the strict-aliasing rule in the simplest assignment

After reading the Understanding Strict Aliasing article https://cellperformance.beyond3d.com/articles/2006/06/understanding-strict-aliasing.html I see, how breaking the strict-aliasing rules can cause ...
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1answer
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Is it well-defined to use memset on a dynamic bool array?

Is this code well-defined behavior, in terms of strict aliasing? _Bool* array = malloc(n); memset(array, 0xFF, n); _Bool x = array[0]; The rule of effective type has special cases for memcpy and ...
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Could we access member of a non-existing class type object?

In the c++ standard, in [basic.lval]/11.6 says: If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:[.....
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Can we access a member of a non-existing union?

In the c++ standard, in [basic.lval]/11.6 says: If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:[.....
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2answers
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Placement new base subobject of derived in C++

Is it defined behavior to placement-new a trivially destructible base object of a derived? struct base { int& ref; }; struct derived : public base { complicated_object complicated; ...
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2answers
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Is aliasing an array of T to an array of std::complex<T> legal?

I am aware of the strong type-aliasing rule. However, cppreference notes that An implementation cannot declare additional non-static data members that would occupy storage disjoint from the real ...
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1answer
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C++ type aliasing, where value is replaced

Is the following code legal in C++? int get_i(int idx) { ... } float transform(int i) { ... } void use(float f) { ... } static_assert(sizeof(int) == sizeof(float)); void* buffer = std::malloc(n * ...
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3answers
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How to indicate absence of aliasing for a struct member?

If you write statements like: a[i] = b[i] + c[i]; ...you might want to indicate to the compiler that a[i], b[i] and c[i] point to different places in memory, thus enabling various optimizations (e.g....
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2answers
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Why doesn't strict aliasing rule apply to int* and unsigned*?

In the C language, we cannot access an object using an lvalue expression that has an incompatible type with the effective type of that object as this yields to undefined behaviour. And based on this ...
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2answers
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Is there a legal way to convert a unsigned char pointer to std::byte pointer?

I use the STB library to load images into memory. The specific function, stbi_load, returns a pointer to an unsigned char, which is an array. I'm tempted to use the new C++17 API for raw data, std::...
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1answer
134 views

_Bool type and strict aliasing

I was trying to write some macros for type safe use of _Bool and then stress test my code. For evil testing purposes, I came up with this dirty hack: _Bool b=0; *(unsigned char*)&b = 42; Given ...
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1answer
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Does dereferencing void**-casted type** break strict aliasing?

Consider this artificial example: #include <stddef.h> static inline void nullify(void **ptr) { *ptr = NULL; } int main() { int i; int *p = &i; nullify((void **) &p); ...
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2answers
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Strict Aliasing Rule and Type Aliasing in C++

I am trying to get a grasp of undefined-behavior when violating the strict aliasing rule. I have read many articles on SO in order to understand it. However, one question remains: I do not really ...
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3answers
560 views

reinterpret_cast vs strict aliasing

I was reading about strict aliasing, but its still kinda foggy and I am never sure where is the line of defined / undefined behaviour. The most detailed post i found concentrates on C. So it would be ...
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3answers
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Is it legal to reuse memory from a fundamental type array for a different (yet still fundamental) type array

This is a follow up to this other question about memory re-use. As the original question was about a specific implementation, the answer was related to that specific implementation. So I wonder ...
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2answers
352 views

Buffer filled with different types of data, and strict aliasing

According to the standard, it is always undefined behavior in C++ to make, for example, a float* point to the same memory location as a int*, and then read/write from them. In the application I have, ...
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Why does N2263 view “wildcard” or “escape-hatch” provenance as problematical?

Reading through standard proposal document "n2263: Clarifying Pointer Provenance v4" (http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n2263.htm#provenance-escape-hatches-for-io-and-inter-object-...
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Does access through pointer change strict aliasing semantics?

With these definitions: struct My_Header { uintptr_t bits; } struct Foo_Type { struct My_Header header; int x; } struct Foo_Type *foo = ...; struct Bar_Type { struct My_Header header; float x; } ...
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2answers
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Does strict aliasing prevent you from writing to a char array through a different type?

My understanding is that strict aliasing in C++ is defined in basic.lval 11: (11) If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following ...
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3answers
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Is std::memcpy between different trivially copyable types undefined behavior?

I've been using std::memcpy to circumvent strict aliasing for a long time. For example, inspecting a float, like this: float f = ...; uint32_t i; static_assert(sizeof(f)==sizeof(i)); std::memcpy(&...
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6answers
915 views

Reusing a float buffer for doubles without undefined behaviour

In one particular C++ function, I happen to have a pointer to a big buffer of floats that I want to temporarily use to store half the number of doubles. Is there a method to use this buffer as scratch ...
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1answer
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std::launder and strict aliasing rule

Consider this code: void f(char * ptr) { auto int_ptr = reinterpret_cast<int*>(ptr); // <---- line of interest // use int_ptr ... } void example_1() { int i = 10; f(...
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2answers
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Does giving data an effective type count as a side-effect?

Suppose I have a chunk of dynamically allocated data: void* allocate (size_t n) { void* foo = malloc(n); ... return foo; } I wish to use the data pointed at by foo as a special type, type_t. ...
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4answers
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Structure over flexible array member

I'm writing a C program (g++ compilable) that has to deal with a lot of different structures, all coming from a buffer with a predefined format. The format specifies which type of structure I should ...
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2answers
301 views

When are type-punned pointers safe in practice?

A colleague of mine is working on C++ code that works with binary data arrays a lot. In certain places, he has code like char *bytes = ... T *p = (T*) bytes; T v = p[i]; // UB Here, T can be ...
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1answer
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g++'s strict-aliasing warning accuracy

GCC's documentation says that -Wstrict-aliasing=3 is the most accurate level and that lower levels are more likely to give false positives. I believe the following examples all violate the strict ...
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Are there are any examples of modern target/compilers where breaking strict aliasing in C affects the programs result?

Sometimes questions and answers on Stack overflow suggest pointer cast as a valid way of type punning. It is often refused by claims that this breaks strict aliasing and hence invokes undefined ...
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2answers
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Is it a strict aliasing violation to alias a struct as its first member?

Sample code: struct S { int x; }; int func() { S s{2}; return (int &)s; // Equivalent to *reinterpret_cast<int *>(&s) } I believe this is common and considered acceptable....
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1answer
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C++ strict aliasing rule for bit field struct

Does the getValue() member function below violate the c++ strict aliasing rule? According to the standard, I believe setValue() violates the strict aliasing rule since double is neither an aggregate ...
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0answers
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Strict aliasing of array vs std::array

This problem depends on the GCC verion used. On 5.4.0, at least, the following code will fail: #include <iostream> #include <iomanip> #include <array> int main() { ...