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Questions tagged [strictness]

In the semantics of Haskell, strictness relates to whether evaluating an expression forces evaluation of a sub-expression.

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127 views

Why is HashMap not in normal form upon series of inserts?

I've been trying to ensure the strictness of an in-memory model of a Haskell program using ghc-heap-view package and the utils it provides when I noticed that my HashMaps don't seem to be in NF upon a ...
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How can seq evaluate an inifinite list in Haskell?

It is said that the Haskell seq function forces the evaluation of its first argument and returns the second. It is used to add strictness to evaluation of expressions. So how can the following simply ...
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How to fully evaluate a recursive data type using Control.DeepSeq in Haskell?

I am trying to benchmark (with Criterion) a function, which uses a recursive data type. I found a similar question with an answer that I haven't been able to apply for my case. For non-recursive data ...
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Automatically inserting laziness in Haskell

Haskell pattern matching is often head strict, for example,f (x:xs) = ... requires input list to be evaluated to (thunk : thunk). But sometimes such evaluation is not needed and function can afford to ...
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GHC error for missing strict fields

I'm reading this article. It reads: When constructing a value with record syntax, GHC will give you an error if you forget a strict field. It will only give you a warning for non-strict fields. ...
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Can sequence over infinte maybes ever terminate?

In other words, can the following be optimized to Just [1..]? > sequence (map Just [1..]) *** Exception: stack overflow There is also a more specific example in data61/fp-course where early ...
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Existential data types with a single strict field

So I have an existential data type with a single strict field: data Uncurry (a :: i -> j -> *) (z :: (i,j)) = forall x y. z ~ '(x,y) => Uncurry !(a x y) Experimentation using ...
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Does Haskell have a strict Set container?

If we look at the containers package. They have Data.Map.Strict, but there is no equivalent Data.Set.Strict. Would it make sense for it to exist?
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Can pseq be defined in terms of seq?

As far as I know, seq a b evaluates (forces) a and b before returning b. It does not guarantee that a is evaluated first. pseq a b evaluates a first, then evaluates/returns b. Now consider the ...
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Operating infinite lists with strict monads

I have a function f :: [a] -> b that operates on infinite lists (e.g. take 5, takeWhile (< 100) . scanl (+) 0 and so on). I want to feed this function with values generated by strict monadic ...
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Example of performance degradation due to the use of strict data constructors

I'm reading about strict data constructors. The linked Wiki article states that, "strictness annotations can make performance worse [because] a strictness annotation forces the compiler to ensure ...
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Is there any guarantee about the evaluation order within a pattern match?

The following (&&) :: Bool -> Bool -> Bool False && _ = False True && False = False True && True = True has the desired short-circuit property False && ...
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Is evaluate or $! sufficient to WHNF-force a value in a multithreaded monadic context, or do I need pseq?

The following seems to work (as in: it keeps saying Surely tomorrow every second) import Control.Concurrent import Control.Concurrent.MVar import Control.Exception (evaluate) main :: IO () main = ...
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How is Haskell's seq used?

So, Haskell seq function forces the evaluation of it's first parameter and returns the third. Consequently it is an infix operator. If you want to force the evaluation of an expression, intuitively ...
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1answer
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When is it useful to use “strict wildcard” in Haskell, and what does it do?

I was looking at some Haskell source code and came across a pattern match with !_, the code is here: http://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.9.0.0/docs/src/GHC.List.html#unsafeTake take n xs | 0 &...
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Mapping a strict vs. a lazy function

(head . map f) xs = (f . head) xs It works for every xs list when f is strict. Can anyone give me example, why with non-strict f it doesnt work?
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Avoiding CAF in Haskell

To avoid CAF (resource sharing), I tried converting to function with dummy argument, but no success (noCafB). I've read How to make a CAF not a CAF in Haskell? so tried noCafC and noCafD. When ...
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IO monad prevents short circuiting of embedded mapM?

Somewhat mystified by the following code. In non-toy version of the problem I'm trying to do a monadic computation in a monad Result, the values of which can only be constructed from within IO. Seems ...
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1answer
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Irrefutable/lazy pattern exercise in Haskell wikibook

Half way down here... https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Laziness ...is an exercise asking about the effects of changes to an alternative implementation of the head function that uses irrefutable ...
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Strict Maybe in data definitions

I have seen many talks / read blog posts that you should have strict fields in data to avoid various performance issues, e.g.: data Person = Person { personName :: !Text , personBirthday :...
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1answer
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Where can BangPatterns appear

From GHC user guide it seems like most Pat can be PBangPat, but there are a few exceptions. e.g. top-level bangs in a module (like !main) aren't allowed and x : !xs fails to parse x : (!xs) parses ...
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What does “⊥” mean in “The Strictness Monad” from P. Wadler's paper?

Can someone help me understand the following definition from Wadler's paper titled "Comprehending Monads"? (Excerpt is from section 3.2/page 9, i.e., the "Strictness Monad" subsection.) Sometimes ...
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1answer
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A Stricter Control.Monad.Trans.Writer.Strict

So we have: import Control.Monad.Writer.Strict type M a = Writer (Map Key Val) a for some Key and Val. Everything works okay as long as we don't look at the collected outputs: report comp = do ...
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About strictness in haskell

I've created the following Haskell prime function (within ghci): let pi :: Int -> Int -> Int; pi 1 _ = 2; pi x y = if all (/=0) (map (rem y) [pi z 2| z <- [1..(x-1)]]) then y else pi x (y+1);...
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Infinite recursion when enumerating all values of a Generic instance

For another answer of mine, I wrote the following code, providing diagonally traversed Universe instances for enumerable Generics (it's slightly updated from the version there, but uses the same logic)...
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Weak head normal form and order of evaluation

I've read lots on weak head normal form and seq. But I'm still have trouble imagining the logic behind Haskell's order of evaluation A common example demonstrating when and how to use but I still ...
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Logical AND strictness with IO monad

I am trying to write a simple program in Haskell. It should basically run two shell commands in parallel. Here is the code: import System.Cmd import System.Exit import Control.Monad exitCodeToBool ...
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1answer
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What is spine strictness

In Haskell, the term spine strictness is often mentioned in relation to lazy evaluation. Though I have a vague understanding of that it means, it would be nice to have a more concrete explanation ...
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Evaluation and space leaks in Haskell

I'm learning Haskell and currently trying to wrap my head around monads. While playing with some random number generation I got tripped on lazy evaluation once again. In an effort to simplify ...
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211 views

strict evaluation of integer accumulator

Here is a classic first attempt at a custom length function: length1 [] = 0 length1 (x:xs) = 1 + length1 xs And here is a tail-recursive version: length2 = length2' 0 where length2' n [] ...
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240 views

Type enforced “strict/imperitive” subset/version of Haskell

I quite like Haskell, however one of the main things that concerns me about Haskell the difficulty in reasoning about space usage. Basically the possibility of thunks and recursion seem to make some ...
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1answer
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Stack space overflow (possibly related to mapM)

I'm writing a program that creates a shell script containing one command for each image file in a directory. There are 667,944 images in the directory, so I need to handle the strictness/laziness ...
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3answers
782 views

Haskell foldl' poor performance with (++)

I have this code: import Data.List newList_bad lst = foldl' (\acc x -> acc ++ [x*2]) [] lst newList_good lst = foldl' (\acc x -> x*2 : acc) [] lst These functions return lists with each ...
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What's the meaning of strict version in haskell?

Follow <Real World Haskell> , it is said foldl' are strict version of foldl. But it's hard for me to understand , what does strict mean?? foldl f z0 xs0 = lgo z0 xs0 where ...
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4answers
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Does the existence rseq/seq break referential transparency? Are there some alternative approaches that don't?

I always thought that replacing an expression x :: () with () :: () would be one of the most basic optimizations during compiling Haskell programs. Since () has a single inhabitant, no matter what x ...
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Unsure of how to get the right evaluation order

I'm not sure what the difference between these two pieces of code is (with respect to x), but the first one completes: $ foldr (\x y -> if x == 4 then x else x + y) 0 [1,2 .. ] 10 and the second ...
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Missing something with strictness

I have this code: divisors n = 1:[y|y<-[2..(n `div` 2)], n `mod` y == 0] writeList l = do print "Start" print l Then, i want to call the function with strict argument; i tried: ...
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1answer
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How does the bind operator for Eval in Control.Parallel.Strategies evaluate its argument strictly?

The source code for Control.Parallel.Strategies ( http://hackage.haskell.org/packages/archive/parallel/3.1.0.1/doc/html/src/Control-Parallel-Strategies.html#Eval ) contains a type Eval defined as: ...
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4answers
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Profiling a Haskell program

I have a piece of code that repeatedly samples from a probability distribution using sequence. Morally, it does something like this: sampleMean :: MonadRandom m => Int -> m Float -> m Float ...
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1answer
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Debugging unwanted strictness?

I have a problem that I don't know how to reason about. I was just about to ask if somebody could help me with the specific problem, but it dawned on me that I could ask a more general question and ...
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1answer
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Strict fmap using only Functor, not Monad

One irritation with lazy IO caught to my attention recently import System.IO import Control.Applicative main = withFile "test.txt" ReadMode getLines >>= mapM_ putStrLn where getLines h = ...
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Advantages of strict fields in data types

This may now be a bit fuzzy, but I've been wondering that for a while. To my knowledge with !, one can make sure a parameter for a data constructor is being evaluated before the value is constructed: ...
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Is foldl ever preferable to its strict cousin, foldl'?

Haskell has two left fold functions for lists: foldl, and a "strict" version, foldl'. The problem with the non-strict foldl is that it builds a tower of thunks: foldl (+) 0 [1..5] --> ((((0 + ...
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4answers
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Is operator && strict in Haskell?

For example, I have an operation fnB :: a -> Bool that makes no sense until fnA :: Bool returns False. In C I may compose these two operations in one if block: if( fnA && fnB(a) ){ ...
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What are Haskell's strictness points?

We all know (or should know) that Haskell is lazy by default. Nothing is evaluated until it must be evaluated. So when must something be evaluated? There are points where Haskell must be strict. I ...
278
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6answers
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What is Weak Head Normal Form?

What does Weak Head Normal Form (WHNF) mean? What does Head Normal form (HNF) and Normal Form (NF) mean? Real World Haskell states: The familiar seq function evaluates an expression to what we ...
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2answers
725 views

Why map does not force strictness whereas zipWith does?

There are two strict versions of zipWith function: 1) Really strict, elements of lists l1 and l2 get evaluated so their thunks do not eat all stack space (Don Stewart code) zipWith' f l1 l2 = [ f e1 ...
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3answers
635 views

How to set strictness in list comprehension?

I'm bit stuck how to rewrite following strict-evaluated list comprehension to use seq instead of bang pattern: zipWith' f l1 l2 = [ f e1 e2 | (!e1, !e2) <- zip l1 l2 ] Any idea ? I've tried ...
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How to make a table (Data.Map) strict in haskell?

For learning Haskell (nice language) I'm triying problems from Spoj. I have a table with 19000 elements all known at compile-time. How can I make the table strict with 'seq'? Here a (strong) ...
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2answers
644 views

Forced strictness for lists in haskell

I made really time consuming algorithm which produces a short string as the result. When I try to print it (via putStrLn) it appears on the screen character by character. I did understand why that ...