On a fresh database in simple recovery model with the data file sized at 1GB and the log file at 3GB (laptop machine, both files on the same drive) and recovery interval set to 100 minutes (to avoid a checkpoint skewing the results) I see similar results to you with the single row `inserts` (Script to reproduce at end of answer).

###Results (ms)

    batchNumber  NEWSEQUENTIALID()   IDENTITY()           INT
    1               2066               2870               1910
    2               1950               2616               1746
    3               2000               2456               1863
    4               2063               2856               1756
    5               1983               2953               2013
    6               2070               2590               1976
    7               1906               2490               2003
    8               2086               2626               1750
    9               1856               2720               1896
    10              2043               2786               1883
    11              2036               2653               1863
    12              2126               2556               1943
    13              1930               2630               2060
    14              1990               2670               1913
    15              2003               2726               1803
    16              2023               2616               1843
    17              1986               2660               1880
    18              1986               2533               1883
    19              1890               2370               1913
    20              1980               2276               1660
    NULL           39973              52653              37557

###Conclusion 

It definitely appears to be overhead of the `identity` creation process that is responsible for the results. If I add an additional test case that just inserts a self calculated incrementing integer then the results are much more in-line with what you probably expected to see.

When I put the insert code into stored procedures and review `sys.dm_exec_procedure_stats` it gives the following results (after 20 executions with each execution inserting 100,000 rows one at a time in a loop)

    proc_name      execution_count      total_worker_time    last_worker_time     min_worker_time      max_worker_time      total_elapsed_time   last_elapsed_time    min_elapsed_time     max_elapsed_time     total_physical_reads last_physical_reads  min_physical_reads   max_physical_reads   total_logical_writes last_logical_writes  min_logical_writes   max_logical_writes   total_logical_reads  last_logical_reads   min_logical_reads    max_logical_reads
    -------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- --------------------
    IdentityInsert 20                   45060360             2231067              2094063              2645079              45119362             2234067              2094063              2660080              0                    0                    0                    0                    32505                1626                 1621                 1626                 6268917              315377               276833               315381
    GuidInsert     20                   34829052             1742052              1696051              1833055              34900053             1744052              1698051              1838055              0                    0                    0                    0                    35408                1771                 1768                 1772                 6316837              316766               298386               316774

So in those results `total_worker_time` is about 30% higher. [This represents][1]

> Total amount of CPU time, in
> microseconds, that was consumed by
> executions of this stored procedure
> since it was compiled.

So it simply appears as though the code that generates the `IDENTITY` value is more CPU intensive than that which generates the `NEWSEQUENTIALID()` (The difference between the 2 figures is 10231308 which averages out at about 5µs per insert.) and that for this table definition this fixed CPU cost was sufficiently high to outweigh the additional logical reads and writes incurred due to the greater width of the key.

###So why is `IDENTITY` more CPU intensive than `UuidCreateSequential`?

One obvious area of increased overhead can be seen in the transaction log files. Each row inserted to the `identity` column table generates 2 log file entries (`LOP_IDENT_NEWVAL` and `LOP_INSERT_ROWS`) whereas for the `GUID` column only the `LOP_INSERT_ROWS` entry is generated. Additionally I just read an answer on [dba.stackexchange.com][2] by [@mrdenny][3] that sheds some light on this.

> With IDENTITY the SQL Server pre-caches 20 values into memory, so that
> they are readily available. As values are used, a background process
> generates more values. As you can imagine this 20 value pool can run
> out pretty quickly leaving the application at the mercy of the
> background process that is generating the values.



###What about MultiRow Inserts?

When the 100,000 rows are inserted in a single statement I found the difference disappeared with still perhaps a slight benefit to the `GUID` case but nowhere near as clear cut results.

The reason that it doesn't have the penalty apparent in Phil's code and Mitch's first set of results is because the optimiser does not correctly estimate the number of rows that will be inserted. This seems to be of benefit as there is a certain tipping point at which it will add an additional sort operation for the (supposedly sequential!) `GUID`s. 

![GUID Sort][4]

This sort operation is not required from [the explanatory text in BOL][5].

> Creates a GUID that is greater than
> any GUID previously generated by this
> function on a specified computer since
> Windows was started. After restarting
> Windows, the GUID can start again from
> a lower range, but is still globally
> unique.

So it seemed to me a bug or missing optimisation that SQL Server does not recognise that the output of the compute scalar will already be pre-sorted as it apparently already does for the `identity` column. (**Edit [I reported this and it is now fixed in Denali][6]** )

###Script for multi row inserts

    SET NOCOUNT ON
    
    DECLARE @Results TABLE(
    Batch INT PRIMARY KEY,
    GuidTime INT, 
    IdTime INT)
    
    TRUNCATE TABLE TestInt
    TRUNCATE TABLE TestGuid2
    
    DECLARE @BatchCounter INT = 1
    DECLARE @NumRows INT = 100000
    
    /*Get these pages into cache now
    so first query not penalised*/
    SELECT @BatchCounter = COUNT(*) 
    FROM master..spt_values 
    
    SET @BatchCounter = 1
    
    WHILE @BatchCounter <= 20
    BEGIN
    
    --Do inserts using GUIDs
    DECLARE @GUIDTimeStart DATETIME = GETDATE()
    INSERT TestGuid2 (SomeDate,batchNumber) 
    SELECT TOP (@NumRows) 0,@BatchCounter
    FROM master..spt_values v1,  master..spt_values v2
    DECLARE @GUIDTimeEnd  DATETIME = GETDATE()
    
    --Do inserts using IDENTITY
    DECLARE @IdTimeStart DATETIME = GETDATE()
    INSERT TestInt (SomeDate,batchNumber) 
    SELECT TOP (@NumRows) 0,@BatchCounter
    FROM master..spt_values v1,  master..spt_values v2
    DECLARE @IdTimeEnd DATETIME = GETDATE()
    
    INSERT INTO @Results
    SELECT @BatchCounter,
           DATEDIFF(ms, @GUIDTimeStart, @GUIDTimeEnd) AS GuidTime, 
           DATEDIFF(ms, @IdTimeStart, @IdTimeEnd) AS IdTime
    
    SET @BatchCounter +=1;
    END
    
    SELECT Batch, 
           AVG(GuidTime) GuidTime,
           AVG(IdTime) IdTime
    FROM  @Results     
    GROUP BY Batch
    WITH ROLLUP

###Results (ms)

NB: This batch size is 100,000 not 1 million as in Mitch's answer. 

    Batch       GuidTime    IdTime
    ----------- ----------- -----------
    1           1076        1660
    2           1286        986
    3           946         1106
    4           1000        1050
    5           1023        983
    6           956         1036
    7           1136        1020
    8           946         1070
    9           983         1030
    10          1086        996
    11          923         1023
    12          913         1093
    13          960         1143
    14          1050        1096
    15          1100        1056
    16          1043        1206
    17          893         1046
    18          1006        1140
    19          986         1026
    20          1016        1010
    NULL        1016        1088

Plans for the query above

[![Plan 1][7]][8]


Plans for the code in Phil's answer (the GUID one now gets a parallel plan with an additional sort operator)

[![Plan 2][9]][10]


###Script for single row inserts


        SET NOCOUNT ON
          
        CREATE TABLE TestGuid2 (Id UNIQUEIDENTIFIER NOT NULL DEFAULT NEWSEQUENTIALID() PRIMARY KEY,
        SomeDate DATETIME, batchNumber BIGINT, FILLER CHAR(100))
        
        CREATE TABLE TestInt (Id Int NOT NULL identity(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,
        SomeDate DATETIME, batchNumber BIGINT, FILLER CHAR(100))
        
        CREATE TABLE TestInt2 (Id Int NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
        SomeDate DATETIME, batchNumber BIGINT, FILLER CHAR(100))
        
        DECLARE @BatchCounter INT = 1
        DECLARE @NumRows INT = 100000
        DECLARE @NextId INT = 0
        
        
        WHILE (@BatchCounter <= 20)
        BEGIN 
        BEGIN TRAN
        
        DECLARE @LocalCounter INT = 0
        
            WHILE (@LocalCounter <= @NumRows)
            BEGIN
            INSERT TestGuid2 (SomeDate,batchNumber) VALUES (GETDATE(),@BatchCounter)
            SET @LocalCounter +=1
            END
        
        SET @LocalCounter = 0
        
            WHILE (@LocalCounter <= @NumRows)
            BEGIN
            INSERT TestInt (SomeDate,batchNumber) VALUES (GETDATE(),@BatchCounter)
            SET @LocalCounter +=1
            END
        
        SET @LocalCounter = 0
        
            WHILE (@LocalCounter <= @NumRows)
            BEGIN
            SET @NextId += 1
            INSERT TestInt2 (Id, SomeDate,batchNumber) VALUES (@NextId,  GETDATE(),@BatchCounter)
            SET @LocalCounter +=1
            END    
        
        SET @BatchCounter +=1
        COMMIT 
        END
        
    SELECT batchNumber, SUM([NEWSEQUENTIALID()]) [NEWSEQUENTIALID()]
    FROM (
    SELECT batchNumber,DATEDIFF(ms,MIN(SomeDate),MAX(SomeDate)) AS [NEWSEQUENTIALID()]
    FROM TestGuid2
    GROUP BY batchNumber ) T
    GROUP BY batchNumber
    WITH ROLLUP
    
    SELECT batchNumber, SUM([IDENTITY()]) [IDENTITY()]
    FROM (
    SELECT batchNumber,DATEDIFF(ms,MIN(SomeDate),MAX(SomeDate)) AS [IDENTITY()]
    FROM TestInt
    GROUP BY batchNumber ) T
    GROUP BY batchNumber
    WITH ROLLUP
    
    SELECT batchNumber, SUM([INT]) [INT]
    FROM (
    SELECT batchNumber,DATEDIFF(ms,MIN(SomeDate),MAX(SomeDate)) AS [INT]
    FROM TestInt2
    GROUP BY batchNumber ) T
    GROUP BY batchNumber
    WITH ROLLUP
    
    DROP TABLE TestGuid2
    DROP TABLE TestInt
    DROP TABLE TestInt2


  [1]: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc280701.aspx
  [2]: http://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/1635/why-are-denali-sequences-supposed-to-perform-better-than-identity-columns/1638#1638
  [3]: http://stackoverflow.com/users/4197/mrdenny
  [4]: http://i.stack.imgur.com/FaJbx.png
  [5]: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189786.aspx
  [6]: https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/668540/unnecessary-sort-operation-for-insert-into-clustered-index-with-newsequentialid-key
  [7]: http://i.stack.imgur.com/NHrkk.jpg
  [8]: http://i.stack.imgur.com/NHrkk.jpg
  [9]: http://i.stack.imgur.com/F2UYe.jpg
  [10]: http://i.stack.imgur.com/F2UYe.jpg