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Nicole
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No, it's actually the same process to hashbangs, but with better-looking URLs. Think about what really happens when you use hashbangs...

You say:

With hashbangs, google knows to go to the escaped_fragment url to get their static content.

So in other words,

  1. Google sees a link to site.com/#!/blog
  2. Google requests site.com/?_escaped_fragment_=/blog
  3. You return a snapshot of the content the user should see

As you can see, it already relies on the server. If you aren't serving a snapshot of the content from the server, then your site isn't getting index properly.

With pushState, google just sees nothing as it can't use the javascript to load the json and subsequently create the template.

Actually, Google will see whatever it can request at site.com/blog. The elegance of pushState is that it serves the same content to all users, old and new, JS-capable and not, but the new users get an enhanced experience.

So, in other words, you need to serve the same content at the URL site.com/blog that your client app would transform into. Having a pushState call that pretends site.com/blog exists when it does not is not the purpose and will break your site's search engine readability.

Nicole
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