Let's start differentiating between _observing_ the elements in the continer 
vs. _modifying_ them in place.


# Observing the elements #

Let's consider a simple example:

    vector<int> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};
    
    for (auto x : v)
        cout << x << ' ';

The above code prints the elements (`int`s) in the `vector`:

>     1 3 5 7 9

Now consider another case, in which the vector elements are not just simple integers,
but instances of a more complex class, with custom copy constructor, etc.

    // A sample test class, with custom copy semantics.
    class X
    {
    public:
        X() 
            : m_data(0) 
        {}
        
        X(int data)
            : m_data(data)
        {}
        
        ~X() 
        {}
        
        X(const X& other) 
            : m_data(other.m_data)
        { cout << "X copy ctor.\n"; }
        
        X& operator=(const X& other)
        {
            m_data = other.m_data;       
            cout << "X copy assign.\n";
            return *this;
        }
           
        int Get() const
        {
            return m_data;
        }
        
    private:
        int m_data;
    };
    
    ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const X& x)
    {
        os << x.Get();
        return os;
    }

If we use the above `for (auto x : v) {...}` syntax with this new class:

    vector<X> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};
    
    cout << "\nElements:\n";
    for (auto x : v)
    {
        cout << x << ' ';
    }

the output is something like:

>     [... copy constructor calls for vector<X> initialization ...]
>     
>     Elements:
>     X copy ctor.
>     1 X copy ctor.
>     3 X copy ctor.
>     5 X copy ctor.
>     7 X copy ctor.
>     9
   
As it can be read from the output, **copy constructor** calls are made during 
range-based for loop iterations.  
This is because we are _capturing_ the elements from the container **by value** 
(the `auto x` part in `for (auto x : v)`).

This is _inefficient_ code, e.g. if these elements are instances of `std::string`,
heap memory allocations can be done, with expensive trips to the memory manager, etc.
This is useless if we just want to _observe_ the elements in a container.

So, a better syntax is available: capture **by `const` reference**, i.e. **`const auto&`**:

    vector<X> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};
    
    cout << "\nElements:\n";
    for (const auto& x : v)
    { 
        cout << x << ' ';
    }

Now the output is:

>      [... copy constructor calls for vector<X> initialization ...]
>     
>     Elements:
>     1 3 5 7 9

Without any spurious (and potentially expensive) copy constructor call.

So, when **observing** elements in a container (i.e. for a read-only access),
the following syntax is fine for simple _cheap-to-copy_ types, like `int`, `double`, etc.:

    for (auto elem : container) 

Else, capturing by `const` reference is better in the _general case_, 
to avoid useless (and potentially expensive) copy constructor calls:

    for (const auto& elem : container) 


# Modifying the elements in the container #

If we want to _modify_ the elements in a container using range-based `for`,
the above `for (auto elem : container)` and `for (const auto& elem : container)`
syntaxes are wrong. 

In fact, in the former case, `elem` stores a _copy_ of the original
element, so modifications done to it are just lost and not stored persistently 
in the container, e.g.:

    vector<int> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};
    for (auto x : v)  // <-- capture by value (copy)
        x *= 10;      // <-- a local temporary copy ("x") is modified,
                      //     *not* the original vector element.

    for (auto x : v)
        cout << x << ' ';

The output is just the initial sequence:

>     1 3 5 7 9

Instead, an attempt of using `for (const auto& x : v)` just fails to compile.

g++ outputs an error message something like this:

>     TestRangeFor.cpp:138:11: error: assignment of read-only reference 'x'
>               x *= 10;
>                 ^

The correct approach in this case is capturing by non-`const` reference:

    vector<int> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};
    for (auto& x : v)
        x *= 10;

    for (auto x : v)
        cout << x << ' ';

The output is (as expected):

>     10 30 50 70 90

This `for (auto& elem : container)` syntax works also for more complex types, 
e.g. considering a `vector<string>`:

    vector<string> v = {"Bob", "Jeff", "Connie"};
    
    // Modify elements in place: use "auto &"
    for (auto& x : v)
        x = "Hi " + x + "!";
        
    // Output elements (*observing* --> use "const auto&")
    for (const auto& x : v)
        cout << x << ' ';
        
the output is:

>     Hi Bob! Hi Jeff! Hi Connie!


## The special case of proxy iterators ##

Suppose we have a `vector<bool>`, and we want to invert the logical boolean state 
of its elements, using the above syntax:

    vector<bool> v = {true, false, false, true};
    for (auto& x : v)
        x = !x;

The above code fails to compile.

g++ outputs an error message similar to this:

>     TestRangeFor.cpp:168:20: error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of
>      type 'std::_Bit_reference&' from an rvalue of type 'std::_Bit_iterator::referen
>     ce {aka std::_Bit_reference}'
>          for (auto& x : v)
>                         ^

The problem is that `std::vector` template is _specialized_ for `bool`, with an
implementation that _packs_ the `bool`s to optimize space (each boolean value is
stored in one bit, eight "boolean" bits in a byte). 

Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit),
`vector<bool>` uses a so called **"proxy iterator"** pattern. 
A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does _not_ yeld an 
ordinary `bool &`, but instead returns (by value) a _temporary object_, 
which is a [_proxy class_ convertible to `bool`][wikipedia_vector_bool].
(See also [this question and related answers][SO_vector_bool] here on StackOverflow.)

To modify in place the elements of `vector<bool>`, a new kind of syntax (using `auto&&`) 
must be used:

    for (auto&& x : v)
        x = !x;

The following code works fine:

    vector<bool> v = {true, false, false, true};
    
    // Invert boolean status
    for (auto&& x : v)  // <-- note use of "auto&&" for proxy iterators
        x = !x;

    // Print new element values
    cout << boolalpha;        
    for (const auto& x : v)
        cout << x << ' ';
        
and outputs:

>     false true true false

Note that the **`for (auto&& elem : container)`** syntax works also in the other cases
of ordinary (non-proxy) iterators (e.g. for a `vector<int>` or a `vector<string>`).


# Summary #

The above discussion can be summarized in the following guide-lines:

1.  For **observing** the elements, use the following syntax:
 
        for (const auto& elem : container)    // capture by const reference
 
    - If the objects are _cheap to copy_ (like `int`s, `double`s, etc.), 
      it's possible to use a slightly simplified form:

          for (auto elem : container)    // capture by value

  
  
2.  For **modifying** the elements in place, use:

        for (auto& elem : container)    // capture by (non-const) reference
  
    - If the container uses _"proxy iterators"_ (like `std::vector<bool>`), use:

            for (auto&& elem : container)    // capture by &&
              

            
[wikipedia_vector_bool]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequence_container_%28C%2B%2B%29#Specialization_for_bool
                         "std::vector<bool> specialization on Wikipedia"
                         
[SO_vector_bool]: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8399417/why-vectorboolreference-doesnt-return-reference-to-bool
                  "Why vector<bool>::reference doesn't return reference to bool?"