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C++ is a general-purpose programming language. It was originally designed as an extension to C, and keeps a similar syntax, but is now a completely different language. Use this tag for questions about code (to be) compiled with a C++ compiler. Use a version specific tag for questions related to a specific standard revision [C++11], [C++17], etc.

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0
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It means that the types of arguments, and the number of them are unspecified. A concrete example with which you are probably familiar would be something like printf(char *, ...) If you use printf, …
answered Jan 6 '11 by Paul Butcher
1
vote
There is no reason to ever write a loop that is known, at compile time, to execute exactly once. Doing so, in order to pretend that goto is written as break, is abusive. EDIT: I've just realised th …
answered Jan 7 '11 by Paul Butcher
1
vote
There seems to be some confusion of ideas here: A static member doesn't have to be an integral type, the disadvantage you mention does not exist. const and private are unrelated, just because a memb …
answered Dec 24 '11 by Paul Butcher
8
votes
I'd probably try to demonstrate the power of templates, by demonstrating the annoyance of not using them. A good demonstration would be to write something simple like a stack of doubles (hand-written …
answered Nov 19 '09 by Paul Butcher
1
vote
A stepping debugger, as found in most IDEs will help you with this. Here (for example) is a description of how to set the Execution point in In Visual Studio, which sounds like what you want to do. …
answered Jan 9 '11 by Paul Butcher
3
votes
Avoid putting too many (read, any unnecessary) #includes in your .h file. Doing so can lead to long build times, as e.g. whenever you change Camera.h you will have changed Controller.h, so anything t …
answered Aug 26 '10 by Paul Butcher
2
votes
From your list, you've missed new and delete - some say never to use malloc and free. Also the oft forgotten delete[].
answered Dec 15 '09 by Paul Butcher
1
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Given any pointer to an object, it's value will be different based on whatever it is cast to. Within a member function of MenuBox, this points to the MenuBox part of the object in question. However, …
answered Jun 29 '10 by Paul Butcher
3
votes
Personally, I like to keep the content of any blocks as small as possible. One line, calling out to another function is ideal (after Bob Martin's Clean Code). I'd go with an option you haven't propo …
answered May 20 '11 by Paul Butcher
3
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I believe that it is a hard-coded limit, so no. As others have commented, it's difficult to understand what you want to achieve by this. At the end of the day, you'll have to fix them all, so get …
answered May 21 '10 by Paul Butcher