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This tag should be used only on questions that are about Objective-C features or depend on code in the language. The tags [cocoa] and [cocoa-touch] should be used to ask about Apple's frameworks or classes. Use the related tags [ios], [macos], [apple-watch] and [tvos] for issues specific to those platforms.

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1
vote
It would be the same as your current handler. @interface SomeOtherHandler : NSObject { } -(void)onButtonClick:(id)sender; @end // when creating your button [button addTarget:someOtherHandler actio …
answered Oct 7 '09 by Nick Bedford
0
votes
Looking at your code, I can suggest the following changes. There's one line in your for loop which is terribly inefficient: NSString *Flower = [[NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"1.png", @"2.png", @"3.png", …
answered Sep 30 '09 by Nick Bedford
2
votes
In both cases the object being assigned it's array property from [SomeClass getArray] will need to release it itself, unless you set the property to nil. The following is required by the class owning …
answered Sep 29 '09 by Nick Bedford
3
votes
The easiest way to manage a retained property on the iPhone is the following (autorelease is not as bad as you think, at least for most uses): -(id)init { if (self = [super init]) { self. …
answered Feb 18 '10 by Nick Bedford
2
votes
A delegate in Objective-C is essentially a pointer to an object that another class uses to notify it of events. For example, class A asks you for a delegate. You tell it [this] instance of class B wi …
answered Sep 11 '09 by Nick Bedford
19
votes
Outlets (in Interface Builder) are member variables in a class where objects in the designer are assigned when they are loaded at runtime. The IBOutlet macro (which is an empty #define) signals Interf …
answered Jan 15 '10 by Nick Bedford
0
votes
I don't believe you actually need to pass in any button names. Just take out your OK button string and leave it as "nil".
answered Dec 23 '09 by Nick Bedford
6
votes
I think you're confusing the action of changing the check from one to another and the action of toggling one cell only. Assuming you only want one checkmarked cell, you could do the following: +(voi …
answered Sep 23 '09 by Nick Bedford
0
votes
Do you mean the keyword self? -(void)canHazCheeseburger:(BOOL)canHaz { if (canHaz) { self.cheeseBurger = [[[CheeseBurger alloc] init] autorelease]; [cheeseBurger onNomNom]; } …
answered Jan 14 '10 by Nick Bedford
0
votes
You have to know the heights of all cells before the tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath: delegate call which may require you to store heights inside your view controller or some other list. The function …
answered Oct 13 '09 by Nick Bedford
4
votes
Here's a way without any libraries except for modf() from math.h: float fsec = 32025.89f, frac = 0; int milliseconds = (int)(modf(fsec, &frac) * 1000); int isec = (int)frac; int hours = isec / 3600; …
answered Oct 7 '09 by Nick Bedford
4
votes
You should use the class named NSArray or NSMutableArray. These are similar to std::vector however they are somewhat different in their use due to the way Objective-C works. // Immutable array (must …
answered Jul 5 '10 by Nick Bedford
9
votes
Wow, I just figured out the problem. I figured, because the searchDisplayController property for the UIViewController is set inside the initWithSearchBar:contentsController: message I would still aut …
answered Mar 7 '10 by Nick Bedford
2
votes
The code looks fine, even though you're leaking the words string. You need to add an [autorelease] on the end of that alloc call. You could try initWithCString and also trim new lines and surrounding …
answered May 17 '11 by Nick Bedford
-1
votes
That code will crash your application. The second version only copies the pointer then releases the instance. You need to call [object retain] before releasing the reference.
answered Sep 25 '09 by Nick Bedford

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