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In mathematics, a matrix (plural matrices) is a rectangular array of numbers, symbols, or expressions, arranged in rows and columns. The individual items in a matrix are called its elements or entries.

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2
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without analyzing the background of this formula, we can do some basic approaches given minimal assumptions and classic rules like: A: associativity of matrix-multiplication B: solving a system of … -entries of Q only (or else we would have a result matrix of N*N = 2.5e8 entries for your numbers) i used this Code: import numpy as np from time import perf_counter as pc # python 3 only m …
answered Dec 16 '17 by sascha
10
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introduce one variable for every cell of the matrix. N=20 means 400 binary-variables. Adjancency: Precalculate all symmetry-reduced conflicts and add conflict-clauses. Basic theory: a -> !b … ). One thing we can be sure about (imho): symmetry! Given a cell-PDF matrix, we should expect, that the matrix is symmetric (A = A.T). This is checked in the visualization and the euclidean-norm of …
answered Nov 9 '17 by sascha
14
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All those vector-vector and matrix-vector operations are using BLAS internally. BLAS, optimized over decades for different archs, cpus, instructions and cache-sizes has no integer-type! Here is some …
answered Jul 28 '17 by sascha
1
vote
import numpy as np mat = np.array([[2,3,2], [7,7,6], [2,7,3]]) print(mat) max_indices = np.where(mat == np.amax(mat)) print(max_indices) index_max = mat[max_indices] print(index_max) Output: [[2 …
answered Aug 22 '16 by sascha
1
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Here is some partially-hardcoded easy-to-understand-approach. Edit: faster version due to preprocessing Edit 2: one more final speedup (symmetry-reduction in preprocessing) Edit 3: okay; added one m …
answered Oct 18 '16 by sascha
3
votes
As you mentioned, np.linalg.solve needs a full-rank square matrix. For all the other linear cases, if you are interested in min||Ax-b||^2. (you probably are) you can use np.linalg.lstsq. Solves …
answered Sep 23 '17 by sascha
1
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For debugging purposes you are probably interested in knowing if those errors are small or not. You might use the following demo, which: creates some erroneous sym-matrix checks symmetry using the … is probably something seriously broken. When having small errors, you might use sklearn's util-function, which actually provides a repaired matrix (by averaging; probably the best you can do without …
answered Dec 13 '17 by sascha
3
votes
Your problem is called non-negative least-squares and scipy supports it. Without testing, usage would look like: import numpy as np from scipy.optimize import nnls N=10 A = np.random.rand(N,N) B = …
answered Jun 5 '17 by sascha
2
votes
This is actually quite a common-form and if you are able to use python's excellent scientific-stack (numpy and scipy needed for this approach), this is already available: import numpy as np from scip …
answered Dec 13 '17 by sascha
0
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A start would be: import numpy as np np.random.seed(1) M, N = 5, 4 a = np.random.choice([0, 1, 2], size=(M, N), p=[0.6, 0.2, 0.2]).astype(float) print(a) a_inds = np.where(~a.any(axis=0))[0] b_ind …
answered Oct 10 '17 by sascha
0
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This is the Steiner tree problem and NP-hard. In your example it seems you got a 8-neighborhood grid here as diagonals are allowed. In the case of 4-neighborhood, there is a special version called Re …
answered Oct 23 '17 by sascha
1
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Modified code: import random def randsq(word): size = len(word) for i in range(size): for j in range(size): if i == j: # we are at a diagonal-value print( …
answered Oct 3 '16 by sascha
1
vote
The approach in your link is working: import numpy as np data = np.matrix([[9, 8], [7, 6], [5, 7], [3, 2], [1, 0]]) print(data[np.argsort(data.A[:, 1])]) [[1 0] …
answered May 29 '16 by sascha
1
vote
To be honest: your question needs context! It's not exactly clear what you need, how it is parameterized and what you are needing it for. The pattern, name coeff matrix and sparseness somewhat points …
answered Jan 15 '18 by sascha
0
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A general remark: It's obvious you are missing a lot of programming basics and should read way more tutorials. Using sklearn without knowing, that it's completely based on numpy and scipy-arrays show …
answered Aug 13 '17 by sascha

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