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C# (pronounced "see sharp") is a high level, statically typed, multi-paradigm programming language developed by Microsoft. C# code usually targets Microsoft's .NET family of tools and run-times, which include the .NET Framework and .NET Core. Use this tag for questions about code written in C# or C#'s formal specification.

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153
votes
Quite simple indeed: bool b = str == "1";
answered Mar 16 '12 by Kendall Frey
162
votes
A console application does not automatically add a reference to System.Windows.Forms.dll. Right-click your project in Solution Explorer and select Add reference... and then find System.Windows.Forms …
answered Mar 10 '12 by Kendall Frey
131
votes
No, you don't want a generic method. This is much easier: MyEnum enum = (MyEnum)myInt; MyEnum enum = (MyEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyEnum), myString); I think it will also be faster.
answered May 9 '14 by Kendall Frey
78
votes
Use a timer. There are 3 basic kinds, each suited for different purposes. System.Windows.Forms.Timer Use only in a Windows Form application. This timer is processed as part of the message loop, so …
answered Jul 2 '12 by Kendall Frey
84
votes
Instead of "$2 $1", you can use "${secondMatch} ${firstMatch}". There is a list of all the replacements you can do here. Here is an abbreviated list: $number - The captured group by number. ${name …
answered Oct 18 '12 by Kendall Frey
50
votes
I'm guessing that you are creating a new Quotes with the same values. In this case they are not equal. If they should be considered equal, override the Equals and GetHashCode methods. public class Qu …
answered Jan 5 '12 by Kendall Frey
10
votes
Use uint.TryParse() and cast the result to int. string s = "4294967196"; uint ux; int x = 0; if (uint.TryParse(s, out ux)) { x = (int)ux; } // x = -100
answered Apr 24 '12 by Kendall Frey
35
votes
PropertyInfo[] properties = entity.GetType().GetProperties() .Where(p => p.GetMethod.IsVirtual).ToArray(); Or, for .NET 4 and below: PropertyInfo[] properties = entity.GetType().GetProperties() …
answered Sep 6 '12 by Kendall Frey
33
votes
Here is the difference between the two statements: x += x ?? 1 x = (x + x) ?? 1 The second isn't what you were expecting. Here's a breakdown of them both: x += x ?? 1 x += null ?? 1 x += 1 x = x …
answered Oct 3 '12 by Kendall Frey
11
votes
Yes. ObservableCollection<T> implements IList<T>, which means that items are stored in the order you specify. As a general rule, this is how the basic collection types in .NET work. IEnumerable<T …
answered May 22 '13 by Kendall Frey
7
votes
The reason lies in the CLR itself. The CLR does not treat Int32 as any ordinary struct. It has a special type for storing int, which is not a CLR object. This means that it does not need a contructor, …
answered Jun 22 '12 by Kendall Frey
9
votes
A static method is called like this: MyClass.Method(arg); An instance method is called like this: MyClass myInstance = new MyClass(); myInstance.Method(arg); The two are not compatible. If you …
answered Apr 26 '12 by Kendall Frey
5
votes
The compiler doesn't know whether those if statements are going to be executed, so it considers the worst case scenario, and realizes that one or both variables may not be initialized before they are …
answered Jul 14 '12 by Kendall Frey
25
votes
Here's a function to convert a char to an escape sequence: string GetEscapeSequence(char c) { return "\\u" + ((int)c).ToString("X4"); } It isn't gonna get much better than a one-liner. And no, …
answered Nov 8 '12 by Kendall Frey
19
votes
The difference between the two lies in the way the compiler optimizes floating point operations. Let me explain. string value = "0.01"; float convertedValue = float.Parse(value); return (int)(convert …
answered Mar 14 '12 by Kendall Frey

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