Print

Oleg Oshmyan

Contributor to libass and more
Last active on Stack Overflow today
Favorite editor: Sublime Text • First computer: Compaq Deskpro 2000 with 133 MHz Pentium & Windows 95; x86 with Windows 3.1

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Nov 2016 → Current (1 year, 11 months)
Programmer at Complete Payment Systems

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Dec 2012 → Current (5 years, 10 months)

I wrote this reimplementation of Event Related Model, an in-game scripting language, based on my much earlier unfinished attempt at the same. I scrapped most of the earlier work and rewrote it from scratch.

This was my first project using C++11, and this was a conscious choice I made at the start of the project. The most prominent gain from this was that I was eventually able to make a really nice C++ API for my library using variadic templates. The API automatically translates between C++ compile-time types and ERM run-time values with no effort on the part of the API client.

The library has two modes for executing the script: a simple interpreter that walks the abstract syntax tree and a much faster LLVM-based JIT compiler. This was my first project using LLVM or a compiler engine of any kind.

I wrote this reimplementation of Event Related Model, an in-game scripting language, based on my much earlier unfinished attempt at the same. I scrapped most of the earlier work and rewrote it from scratch.

This was my first project using C++11, and this was a conscious choice I made at the start of the project. The most prominent gain from this was that I was eventually able to make a really nice C++ API for my library using variadic templates. The API automatically translates between C++ compile-time types and ERM run-time values with no effort on the part of the API client.

The library has two modes for executing the script: a simple interpreter that walks the abstract syntax tree and a much faster LLVM-based JIT compiler. This was my first project using LLVM or a compiler engine of any kind.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Aug 2012 → Current (6 years, 2 months)
Last commit on Jan 08, 18
150 Commits / 2,950 ++ / 2,192 --

libass is a subtitle renderer library widely used by media players when playing video files with subtitles. It takes SSA or ASS subtitles and turns them into images that the player then blends onto the video.

I have contributed various changes over the years, and I am currently one of the core developers with direct access to the repository. Many of my changes focus on improving compatibility with other ASS renderers or fixing bugs in our code.

libass is a subtitle renderer library widely used by media players when playing video files with subtitles. It takes SSA or ASS subtitles and turns them into images that the player then blends onto the video.

I have contributed various changes over the years, and I am currently one of the core developers with direct access to the repository. Many of my changes focus on improving compatibility with other ASS renderers or fixing bugs in our code.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Jul 2011 → Current (7 years, 3 months)

This extension for Mercurial is like a simplified git stash. I submitted some patches as early as July 2011, and I have been officially maintaining hgshelve since February 2013, when its original author TK Soh transferred the responsibility to me.

This extension for Mercurial is like a simplified git stash. I submitted some patches as early as July 2011, and I have been officially maintaining hgshelve since February 2013, when its original author TK Soh transferred the responsibility to me.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Jul 2011 → Current (7 years, 3 months)

I maintain a fork of the now defunct mplayer2 media player that contains additional patches, some of which I (back)ported from mpv or MPlayer and some of which I wrote myself. Most of the patches concern portability and compatibility, but some introduce small features that I have personally found useful.

I maintain a fork of the now defunct mplayer2 media player that contains additional patches, some of which I (back)ported from mpv or MPlayer and some of which I wrote myself. Most of the patches concern portability and compatibility, but some introduce small features that I have personally found useful.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Dec 2010 → Current (7 years, 10 months)

AtomicParsley is a command-line program for reading and writing various kinds of metadata in MPEG-4 files. I have contributed bug fixes, in particular resolving portability problems and issues causing crashing and memory corruption.

AtomicParsley is a command-line program for reading and writing various kinds of metadata in MPEG-4 files. I have contributed bug fixes, in particular resolving portability problems and issues causing crashing and memory corruption.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Dec 2010 → Current (7 years, 10 months)

I wrote this automated program tester entirely from scratch so that I could easily evaluate my (and my friends’) solutions to problems set in the International Olympiad in Informatics and other similar events and get nice results resembling the scoring used at the real event.

I wrote this automated program tester entirely from scratch so that I could easily evaluate my (and my friends’) solutions to problems set in the International Olympiad in Informatics and other similar events and get nice results resembling the scoring used at the real event.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Assessment Feb 2018
Title: C# - Score: 267/300

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Assessment Feb 2018
Title: Python - Score: 280/300

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Assessment Feb 2018
Title: C++ - Score: 276/300

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Education Oct 2010 → May 2017

This is a nominal degree. Every holder of a BA degree is granted an MA several years after graduation.

This is a nominal degree. Every holder of a BA degree is granted an MA several years after graduation.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Competition May 2017
Most languages ever used in Google Code Jam

I updated my record of using more distinct programming languages over the entire history of Google Code Jam competitions than any other contestant. According to the statistics at go-hero.net, my current total is 64 languages. (It would be 65 if go-hero.net counted Bash and cmd as separate languages rather than both as “Shell”.)

I made 20 successful submissions this year, each was written in a different language, and all were languages I had never before used in Code Jam. The only language go-hero.net shows I had supposedly used before is cmd, because it lists it as “Shell”, so it aliases sh and Bash, which I used in 2013 and 2015.

Since Code Jam no longer allows arbitrary languages from 2018 on, this record is likely to stand forever!

I updated my record of using more distinct programming languages over the entire history of Google Code Jam competitions than any other contestant. According to the statistics at go-hero.net, my current total is 64 languages. (It would be 65 if go-hero.net counted Bash and cmd as separate languages rather than both as “Shell”.)

I made 20 successful submissions this year, each was written in a different language, and all were languages I had never before used in Code Jam. The only language go-hero.net shows I had supposedly used before is cmd, because it lists it as “Shell”, so it aliases sh and Bash, which I used in 2013 and 2015.

Since Code Jam no longer allows arbitrary languages from 2018 on, this record is likely to stand forever!

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Competition May 2016
Most languages ever used in Google Code Jam

I have successfully used more distinct programming languages over the entire history of Google Code Jam competitions than any other contestant, according to the statistics at go-hero.net. My current total is 45 languages.

I have successfully used more distinct programming languages over the entire history of Google Code Jam competitions than any other contestant, according to the statistics at go-hero.net. My current total is 45 languages.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Feb 2015 → Nov 2015 (10 months)
Programmer at Xtransform

I co-designed and implemented the first version of Xearch.

I co-designed and implemented the first version of Xearch.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Jul 2014 → Dec 2014 (6 months)
Software Engineer at Ferrari

I worked on in-house software at Scuderia Ferrari.

I worked on in-house software at Scuderia Ferrari.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Jan 2014 → Jun 2014 (6 months)

I extended this static analysis tool for Fortran code to make it read unit-of-measure type attributes, infer missing units of measure and verify their consistency during type checking. This eventually led to the publication of an article in the Journal of Computational Science.

I extended this static analysis tool for Fortran code to make it read unit-of-measure type attributes, infer missing units of measure and verify their consistency during type checking. This eventually led to the publication of an article in the Journal of Computational Science.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Education Oct 2010 → Jun 2014
  • In a group, we created a completely new programming language and a Web-based system where interviewers can set problems and prospective interviewees can solve them in our language before their first interview. Their solutions are automatically tested and reported to the interviewers, helping them filter out applicants that clearly lack basic programming skills required for the job.

  • I built liberm, an open-source library to parse, interpret and optionally JIT-compile (using LLVM) scripts written in the ERM language.

  • I extended the CamFort static analysis tool for Fortran code to make it read unit-of-measure type attributes, infer missing units of measure and verify their consistency during type checking. This eventually led to the publication of an article in the Journal of Computational Science.

  • I was an active member and volunteered as the webmaster and a “magical solver of every possible [computer] problem” at the Cambridge University Anime and Manga Society.

  • In a group, we created a completely new programming language and a Web-based system where interviewers can set problems and prospective interviewees can solve them in our language before their first interview. Their solutions are automatically tested and reported to the interviewers, helping them filter out applicants that clearly lack basic programming skills required for the job.

  • I built liberm, an open-source library to parse, interpret and optionally JIT-compile (using LLVM) scripts written in the ERM language.

  • I extended the CamFort static analysis tool for Fortran code to make it read unit-of-measure type attributes, infer missing units of measure and verify their consistency during type checking. This eventually led to the publication of an article in the Journal of Computational Science.

  • I was an active member and volunteered as the webmaster and a “magical solver of every possible [computer] problem” at the Cambridge University Anime and Manga Society.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Competition Jun 2013

I successfully used more distinct programming languages in Google Code Jam’s 2013 season than anyone else did, having written each of my 18 successful submissions in a distinct language.

I successfully used more distinct programming languages in Google Code Jam’s 2013 season than anyone else did, having written each of my 18 successful submissions in a distinct language.

Oleg Oshmyan

Technical Skills

Likes: c c99 c11 c++ c++11 c++14 c++17 python python-3.x
Dislikes: javascript angularjs php wpf

Experience

Nov 2016 → Current Programmer Complete Payment Systems
java, java-8, spring, spring-boot, spring-data, spring-data-jpa, spring-security, spring-security-ldap, osgi, jpa, hibernate, eclipselink, postgresql, oracle, querydsl, ldap, twitter-bootstrap, javascript, jquery, datatables, datatables-1.10, thymeleaf, gradle, maven, asset-pipeline, tomcat, servicemix, git, gitlab, jira
Feb 2015 → Nov 2015 Programmer Xtransform
java, java-8, spring, spring-boot, lucene, apache-tika, jna, winapi, twitter-bootstrap, thymeleaf, gradle, nsis, git, bitbucket

I co-designed and implemented the first version of Xearch.

Jul 2014 → Dec 2014 Software Engineer Ferrari
c#, .net, asp.net, wpf, resharper, git, gitblit, tfs, teamcity, youtrack

I worked on in-house software at Scuderia Ferrari.

Education

Oct 2010 → May 2017 MA University of Cambridge

This is a nominal degree. Every holder of a BA degree is granted an MA several years after graduation.

Oct 2010 → Jun 2014 MEng, BA (Hons) Computer Science University of Cambridge
ml, java, prolog, haskell, llvm
  • In a group, we created a completely new programming language and a Web-based system where interviewers can set problems and prospective interviewees can solve them in our language before their first interview. Their solutions are automatically tested and reported to the interviewers, helping them filter out applicants that clearly lack basic programming skills required for the job.

  • I built liberm, an open-source library to parse, interpret and optionally JIT-compile (using LLVM) scripts written in the ERM language.

  • I extended the CamFort static analysis tool for Fortran code to make it read unit-of-measure type attributes, infer missing units of measure and verify their consistency during type checking. This eventually led to the publication of an article in the Journal of Computational Science.

  • I was an active member and volunteered as the webmaster and a “magical solver of every possible [computer] problem” at the Cambridge University Anime and Manga Society.

Projects & Interests

Dec 2012 → Current liberm https://bitbucket.org/astiob/liberm
c++, c++11, c++14, llvm, llvm-c++-api, mercurial, bitbucket

I wrote this reimplementation of Event Related Model, an in-game scripting language, based on my much earlier unfinished attempt at the same. I scrapped most of the earlier work and rewrote it from scratch.

This was my first project using C++11, and this was a conscious choice I made at the start of the project. The most prominent gain from this was that I was eventually able to make a really nice C++ API for my library using variadic templates. The API automatically translates between C++ compile-time types and ERM run-time values with no effort on the part of the API client.

The library has two modes for executing the script: a simple interpreter that walks the abstract syntax tree and a much faster LLVM-based JIT compiler. This was my first project using LLVM or a compiler engine of any kind.

Aug 2012 → Current libass https://github.com/libass/libass
subtitle, c, git, github, google-code, freetype, fontconfig, winapi

libass is a subtitle renderer library widely used by media players when playing video files with subtitles. It takes SSA or ASS subtitles and turns them into images that the player then blends onto the video.

I have contributed various changes over the years, and I am currently one of the core developers with direct access to the repository. Many of my changes focus on improving compatibility with other ASS renderers or fixing bugs in our code.

Jul 2011 → Current hgshelve https://bitbucket.org/astiob/hgshelve
python, python-2.x, mercurial-extension, mercurial, bitbucket

This extension for Mercurial is like a simplified git stash. I submitted some patches as early as July 2011, and I have been officially maintaining hgshelve since February 2013, when its original author TK Soh transferred the responsibility to me.

Jul 2011 → Current mplayer2 https://github.com/astiob/mplayer2
c, opengl, glsl, git

I maintain a fork of the now defunct mplayer2 media player that contains additional patches, some of which I (back)ported from mpv or MPlayer and some of which I wrote myself. Most of the patches concern portability and compatibility, but some introduce small features that I have personally found useful.

Dec 2010 → Current AtomicParsley https://bitbucket.org/wez/atomicparsley
c++, mercurial, bitbucket

AtomicParsley is a command-line program for reading and writing various kinds of metadata in MPEG-4 files. I have contributed bug fixes, in particular resolving portability problems and issues causing crashing and memory corruption.

Dec 2010 → Current Upreckon https://bitbucket.org/astiob/upreckon
python, python-2.x, python-3.x, posix, winapi, mercurial, bitbucket

I wrote this automated program tester entirely from scratch so that I could easily evaluate my (and my friends’) solutions to problems set in the International Olympiad in Informatics and other similar events and get nice results resembling the scoring used at the real event.

Jan 2014 → Jun 2014 CamFort https://github.com/camfort/camfort
haskell, git, github

I extended this static analysis tool for Fortran code to make it read unit-of-measure type attributes, infer missing units of measure and verify their consistency during type checking. This eventually led to the publication of an article in the Journal of Computational Science.

Others

May 2017 Most languages ever used in Google Code Jam Competition
algol68, awk, bc, cil, cmd, common-lisp, dart, dc, f#, go, groovy, maple, ocaml, powershell, rust, scala, scheme, sed, sql, tcl

I updated my record of using more distinct programming languages over the entire history of Google Code Jam competitions than any other contestant. According to the statistics at go-hero.net, my current total is 64 languages. (It would be 65 if go-hero.net counted Bash and cmd as separate languages rather than both as “Shell”.)

I made 20 successful submissions this year, each was written in a different language, and all were languages I had never before used in Code Jam. The only language go-hero.net shows I had supposedly used before is cmd, because it lists it as “Shell”, so it aliases sh and Bash, which I used in 2013 and 2015.

Since Code Jam no longer allows arbitrary languages from 2018 on, this record is likely to stand forever!

May 2016 Most languages ever used in Google Code Jam Competition
ada, applescript, avisynth, bash, boo, c#, cmake, cobol, cobra, coffeescript, d, erm, excel, forth, gnu-make, haskell, java, javascript, jsx, livescript, llvm-ir, logo-lang, lua, mochi, moonscript, nasm, nsis, objective-c, pascal, perl, php, picat, prolog, python, ruby, smalltalk, sml, taxi, typescript, vb.net, wolfram-mathematica

I have successfully used more distinct programming languages over the entire history of Google Code Jam competitions than any other contestant, according to the statistics at go-hero.net. My current total is 45 languages.

Jun 2013 Most languages used in a Google Code Jam season Competition
autoit, c, c#, c++, d, erm, fortran, javascript, llvm-ir, logo-lang, lua, perl, php, prolog, python, sh, sml, taxi

I successfully used more distinct programming languages in Google Code Jam’s 2013 season than anyone else did, having written each of my 18 successful submissions in a distinct language.

Tools

First Computer: Compaq Deskpro 2000 with 133 MHz Pentium & Windows 95; x86 with Windows 3.1
Favorite Editor: Sublime Text