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Jimmy Kurian

Software Engineer at Donnelley Financial Solutions

Constantly curious and always looking to learn and grow!

Constantly curious and always looking to learn and grow!

Favorite editor: Sublime • First computer: Emachines eTower 500i

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Position 2018 → Current (1 year)
Software Engineer at Donnelley Financial Solutions

• Full-Stack software development in Angular, .NET Core, C# • Azure Cloud Development and Cosmos Database (NoSQL) • Helped develop SEC filing & reporting web application

• Full-Stack software development in Angular, .NET Core, C# • Azure Cloud Development and Cosmos Database (NoSQL) • Helped develop SEC filing & reporting web application

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Education 2014 → 2015
Master of Science in Software Engineering, DePaul University

Involved with DePaul Computer Science Society (DCSS).

Involved with DePaul Computer Science Society (DCSS).

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Joined Stack Overflow
on February 05, 2012

Recommended reading

by Steve McConnell

Capturing the body of knowledge available from research, academia, and everyday commercial practice, McConnell synthesizes the most effective techniques and must-know principles into clear, pragmatic guidance.

Capturing the body of knowledge available from research, academia, and everyday commercial practice, McConnell synthesizes the most effective techniques and must-know principles into clear, pragmatic guidance.

by Robert C. Martin

Clean Code is divided into three parts. The first describes the principles, patterns, and practices of writing clean code. The second part consists of several case studies of increasing complexity. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code—of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. The third part is the payoff: a single chapter containing a list of heuristics and “smells” gathered while creating the case studies. The result is a knowledge base that describes the way we think when we write, read, and clean code.

Clean Code is divided into three parts. The first describes the principles, patterns, and practices of writing clean code. The second part consists of several case studies of increasing complexity. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code—of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. The third part is the payoff: a single chapter containing a list of heuristics and “smells” gathered while creating the case studies. The result is a knowledge base that describes the way we think when we write, read, and clean code.

by Andrew Hunt and David Thomas

The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization and technicalities of modern software development to examine the core process--taking a requirement and producing working, maintainable code that delights its users. It covers topics ranging from personal responsibility and career development to architectural techniques for keeping your code flexible and easy to adapt and reuse.

The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization and technicalities of modern software development to examine the core process--taking a requirement and producing working, maintainable code that delights its users. It covers topics ranging from personal responsibility and career development to architectural techniques for keeping your code flexible and easy to adapt and reuse.

by Martin Fowler

As the application of object technology--particularly the Java programming language--has become commonplace, a new problem has emerged to confront the software development community. Significant numbers of poorly designed programs have been created by less-experienced developers, resulting in applications that are inefficient and hard to maintain and extend. Increasingly, software system professionals are discovering just how difficult it is to work with these inherited, non-optimal applications. For several years, expert-level object programmers have employed a growing collection of techniques to improve the structural integrity and performance of such existing software programs.

As the application of object technology--particularly the Java programming language--has become commonplace, a new problem has emerged to confront the software development community. Significant numbers of poorly designed programs have been created by less-experienced developers, resulting in applications that are inefficient and hard to maintain and extend. Increasingly, software system professionals are discovering just how difficult it is to work with these inherited, non-optimal applications. For several years, expert-level object programmers have employed a growing collection of techniques to improve the structural integrity and performance of such existing software programs.

by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides, and Grady Booch

The authors begin by describing what patterns are and how they can help you design object-oriented software. They then go on to systematically name, explain, evaluate, and catalog recurring designs in object-oriented systems. With Design Patterns as your guide, you will learn how these important patterns fit into the software development process, and how you can leverage them to solve your own design problems most efficiently.

The authors begin by describing what patterns are and how they can help you design object-oriented software. They then go on to systematically name, explain, evaluate, and catalog recurring designs in object-oriented systems. With Design Patterns as your guide, you will learn how these important patterns fit into the software development process, and how you can leverage them to solve your own design problems most efficiently.

by Thomas H. Corment, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein

The book covers a broad range of algorithms in depth, yet makes their design and analysis accessible to all levels of readers. Each chapter is relatively self-contained and can be used as a unit of study. The algorithms are described in English and in a pseudocode designed to be readable by anyone who has done a little programming. The explanations have been kept elementary without sacrificing depth of coverage or mathematical rigor.

The book covers a broad range of algorithms in depth, yet makes their design and analysis accessible to all levels of readers. Each chapter is relatively self-contained and can be used as a unit of study. The algorithms are described in English and in a pseudocode designed to be readable by anyone who has done a little programming. The explanations have been kept elementary without sacrificing depth of coverage or mathematical rigor.

by Donald E. Knuth

This first volume in the series begins with basic programming concepts and techniques, then focuses more particularly on information structures—the representation of information inside a computer, the structural relationships between data elements and how to deal with them efficiently. Elementary applications are given to simulation, numerical methods, symbolic computing, software and system design.

This first volume in the series begins with basic programming concepts and techniques, then focuses more particularly on information structures—the representation of information inside a computer, the structural relationships between data elements and how to deal with them efficiently. Elementary applications are given to simulation, numerical methods, symbolic computing, software and system design.

by Charles Petzold

Using everyday objects and familiar language systems such as Braille and Morse code, author Charles Petzold weaves an illuminating narrative for anyone who’s ever wondered about the secret inner life of computers and other smart machines.

Using everyday objects and familiar language systems such as Braille and Morse code, author Charles Petzold weaves an illuminating narrative for anyone who’s ever wondered about the secret inner life of computers and other smart machines.

by Frederick P. Brooks Jr.

Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone managing complex projects. These essays draw from his experience as project manager for the IBM System/360 computer family and then for OS/360, its massive software system.

Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone managing complex projects. These essays draw from his experience as project manager for the IBM System/360 computer family and then for OS/360, its massive software system.

Jimmy Kurian

Constantly curious and always looking to learn and grow!

Technical Skills

Likes: angular c#

Experience

2018 → Current Software Engineer Donnelley Financial Solutions
angular, c#, .net, tsql, azure-cosmosdb, azure, visual-studio, git, vsts

• Full-Stack software development in Angular, .NET Core, C# • Azure Cloud Development and Cosmos Database (NoSQL) • Helped develop SEC filing & reporting web application

Education

2014 → 2015 Master of Science in Software Engineering DePaul University
java, c#, c, python, ruby-on-rails, jenkins, junit

Involved with DePaul Computer Science Society (DCSS).

Readings

Code Complete 2 Steve McConnell https://www.amazon.com/Code-Complete-Practical-Handbook-Construction/dp/0735619670/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1526497790&sr=8-1&keywords=Code+Complete+2

Capturing the body of knowledge available from research, academia, and everyday commercial practice, McConnell synthesizes the most effective techniques and must-know principles into clear, pragmatic guidance.

Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship Robert C. Martin https://www.amazon.com/Clean-Code-Handbook-Software-Craftsmanship/dp/0132350882/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1526497790&sr=8-2&keywords=Code+Complete+2&dpID=515iEcDr1GL&preST=_SX258_BO1,204,203,200_QL70_&dp

Clean Code is divided into three parts. The first describes the principles, patterns, and practices of writing clean code. The second part consists of several case studies of increasing complexity. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code—of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. The third part is the payoff: a single chapter containing a list of heuristics and “smells” gathered while creating the case studies. The result is a knowledge base that describes the way we think when we write, read, and clean code.

Pragmatic Programmer Andrew Hunt and David Thomas https://www.amazon.com/Pragmatic-Programmer-Journeyman-Master/dp/020161622X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1526497986&sr=8-1&keywords=pragmatic+programmer&dpID=41BKx1AxQWL&preST=_SX218_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&d

The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization and technicalities of modern software development to examine the core process--taking a requirement and producing working, maintainable code that delights its users. It covers topics ranging from personal responsibility and career development to architectural techniques for keeping your code flexible and easy to adapt and reuse.

Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code Martin Fowler https://www.amazon.com/Refactoring-Improving-Design-Existing-Code/dp/0201485672/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1526498071&sr=1-1&keywords=refactoring

As the application of object technology--particularly the Java programming language--has become commonplace, a new problem has emerged to confront the software development community. Significant numbers of poorly designed programs have been created by less-experienced developers, resulting in applications that are inefficient and hard to maintain and extend. Increasingly, software system professionals are discovering just how difficult it is to work with these inherited, non-optimal applications. For several years, expert-level object programmers have employed a growing collection of techniques to improve the structural integrity and performance of such existing software programs.

Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides, and Grady Booch https://www.amazon.com/Design-Patterns-Elements-Reusable-Object-Oriented/dp/0201633612/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1526498158&sr=1-4&keywords=design+patterns&dpID=51szD9HC9pL&preST=_SX218_BO1,204,2

The authors begin by describing what patterns are and how they can help you design object-oriented software. They then go on to systematically name, explain, evaluate, and catalog recurring designs in object-oriented systems. With Design Patterns as your guide, you will learn how these important patterns fit into the software development process, and how you can leverage them to solve your own design problems most efficiently.

Introduction to Algorithms Thomas H. Corment, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Algorithms-3rd-MIT-Press/dp/0262033844/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1526498314&sr=1-3&keywords=introduction+to+algorithms&dpID=41-1VkO%252B1lL&preST=_SY291_BO1,20

The book covers a broad range of algorithms in depth, yet makes their design and analysis accessible to all levels of readers. Each chapter is relatively self-contained and can be used as a unit of study. The algorithms are described in English and in a pseudocode designed to be readable by anyone who has done a little programming. The explanations have been kept elementary without sacrificing depth of coverage or mathematical rigor.

The Art of Computer Programming, Vol. 1: Fundamental Algorithms Donald E. Knuth https://www.amazon.com/Art-Computer-Programming-Vol-Fundamental/dp/0201896834/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1526498694&sr=1-4&keywords=The+Art+of+Computer+Programming&dpID=41eCbcQARTL&preST=_SY291_BO

This first volume in the series begins with basic programming concepts and techniques, then focuses more particularly on information structures—the representation of information inside a computer, the structural relationships between data elements and how to deal with them efficiently. Elementary applications are given to simulation, numerical methods, symbolic computing, software and system design.

CODE: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software Charles Petzold https://www.amazon.com/Code-Language-Computer-Hardware-Software/dp/0735611319/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1526498802&sr=1-1&keywords=CODE%3A+The+Hidden+Language+of+Computer+Hardware+and+Software&dp

Using everyday objects and familiar language systems such as Braille and Morse code, author Charles Petzold weaves an illuminating narrative for anyone who’s ever wondered about the secret inner life of computers and other smart machines.

The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering Frederick P. Brooks Jr. https://www.amazon.com/Mythical-Man-Month-Software-Engineering-Anniversary/dp/0201835959/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1526498866&sr=1-1&keywords=the+mythical+man+month&dpID=51WIpM70FEL&preST=_SY291_

Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone managing complex projects. These essays draw from his experience as project manager for the IBM System/360 computer family and then for OS/360, its massive software system.

Tools

First Computer: Emachines eTower 500i
Favorite Editor: Sublime