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Kasra Rahjerdi

Mobile Team Lead at Stack Exchange
New York, NY, United States
http://www.kasrarahjerdi.com jc4p
Last active on Stack Overflow today

Passionate about everything I do (why else do them?), only focused on getting things done. Simple as that.

I absolutely love working on things that are designed to help people make their day-to-day life better. I like to think the term "Product Minded Developer" describes me well.

I develop by prioritizing the user's response to my product over just the beauty of the code. I only work on products I can completely engross myself into. It's all about the default processes and routines, not just what's possible. I dislike the actual act of programming, but I love making things and I'm pretty good at programming so it works out.

I have a lot esoteric interest and hobbies, this intro talk on IoT goes through some of them. Just know that if you ask me about any of the things I mention in that video I will talk until you fall asleep or walk away.

Please don't contact me if I would be the only ethnic person at your company.

Passionate about everything I do (why else do them?), only focused on getting things done. Simple as that.

I absolutely love working on things that are designed to help people make their day-to-day life better. I like to think the term "Product Minded Developer" describes me well.

I develop by prioritizing the user's response to my product over just the beauty of the code. I only work on products I can completely engross myself into. It's all about the default processes and routines, not just what's possible. I dislike the actual act of programming, but I love making things and I'm pretty good at programming so it works out.

I have a lot esoteric interest and hobbies, this intro talk on IoT goes through some of them. Just know that if you ask me about any of the things I mention in that video I will talk until you fall asleep or walk away.

Please don't contact me if I would be the only ethnic person at your company.

Favorite editor: Nano, due to a LONG time teaching my mom how to use pico when she was at the U of WA • First computer: Compaq Presario 5000 with 256MB PC100 RAM. A Command & Conquer beast.
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Position Feb 2014 → Current (4 years, 11 months)
Mobile Team Lead at Stack Exchange
  • After the launch of the Stack Exchange Android and iOS applications I moved into a team lead role.
  • Responsibilities include all my regular developer responsibilities alongside putting on a marketing hat or a product manager hat and any other hats I can find.
  • I started focusing on mentorship and education a lot more. Everything from being a regular guest lecturer at coding bootcamps (I've taught people Ruby and I don't use Ruby, isn't that weird?) to doing 1-on-1 mentorship and guidance.
  • Watch this video to see my thoughts on mobile development and best ways to get started: Careers in Android™: Mobile's Future & You. I'm on the panel and start talking at around the 25 min mark.
  • All product feedback at Stack Exchange is public and in the open, browse through my Meta Stack Exchange account to see my responses/interactions with the community: http://meta.stackexchange.com/users/229741/kasra-rahjerdi. This is probably the most addicting part of working at Stack Exchange, no where else can I just talk to my users in the open and have them help me prioritize my bugs and features.
  • After the launch of the Stack Exchange Android and iOS applications I moved into a team lead role.
  • Responsibilities include all my regular developer responsibilities alongside putting on a marketing hat or a product manager hat and any other hats I can find.
  • I started focusing on mentorship and education a lot more. Everything from being a regular guest lecturer at coding bootcamps (I've taught people Ruby and I don't use Ruby, isn't that weird?) to doing 1-on-1 mentorship and guidance.
  • Watch this video to see my thoughts on mobile development and best ways to get started: Careers in Android™: Mobile's Future & You. I'm on the panel and start talking at around the 25 min mark.
  • All product feedback at Stack Exchange is public and in the open, browse through my Meta Stack Exchange account to see my responses/interactions with the community: http://meta.stackexchange.com/users/229741/kasra-rahjerdi. This is probably the most addicting part of working at Stack Exchange, no where else can I just talk to my users in the open and have them help me prioritize my bugs and features.

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Feature or Apps

Stack Exchange for Android

Stack Exchange for Android

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Feature or Apps

The best fitness community on the planet.

The best fitness community on the planet.

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Feature or Apps

The official Android app for Fitocracy.

For the first few versions, sole dev. Made entirety of app from initial prototypes to production release in around 4 months.

The official Android app for Fitocracy.

For the first few versions, sole dev. Made entirety of app from initial prototypes to production release in around 4 months.

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Open source Sep 2013 → Current (5 years, 4 months)

A Python read-only front-end for Snapchat

Honestly I just really like reverse engineering. I created this project as a result of both reading the web calls the regular app made using a MITM attack on my own devices, and decompiling the android app's code and reading the opcodes (.dex to .java converters exist but they don't do well at complex methods).

A Python read-only front-end for Snapchat

Honestly I just really like reverse engineering. I created this project as a result of both reading the web calls the regular app made using a MITM attack on my own devices, and decompiling the android app's code and reading the opcodes (.dex to .java converters exist but they don't do well at complex methods).

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Open source Sep 2013 → Current (5 years, 4 months)

an employee recognition app for Stack Exchange

Originally made as a personal project to help myself learn the names of my fellow co-workers but has ended up being useful to others (specially new hires). It's technically a Django app due to legacy reasons but the vast majority of the code I actually wrote (i.e. ignoring framework code) is javascript, hoping to use this as an example project to get some node.js experience when I find the time.

an employee recognition app for Stack Exchange

Originally made as a personal project to help myself learn the names of my fellow co-workers but has ended up being useful to others (specially new hires). It's technically a Django app due to legacy reasons but the vast majority of the code I actually wrote (i.e. ignoring framework code) is javascript, hoping to use this as an example project to get some node.js experience when I find the time.

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Open source Aug 2011 → Current (7 years, 5 months)

A simple service which periodically checks a Gmail account using IMAP and tweets any new messages. Created to give a group an easy way to all tweet using the same account while on the go, before all the new fancy tools that let you do that existed.

A simple service which periodically checks a Gmail account using IMAP and tweets any new messages. Created to give a group an easy way to all tweet using the same account while on the go, before all the new fancy tools that let you do that existed.

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Blogs or videos

I like failing. This blog posts explains why :)

I like failing. This blog posts explains why :)

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Background
Background

Moved to the states when I was 10, spent my childhood growing up in that weird area between not-quite-first-generation-American and not-quite-immigrant.

Lucky to have been getting paid to do what I love since I was in high school which I thank completely to the fact that no one asks you how old you are when using freelance dev websites.

Currently obsessed with the weird connections between philosophy, nutrition and fitness, and computer science.

Moved to the states when I was 10, spent my childhood growing up in that weird area between not-quite-first-generation-American and not-quite-immigrant.

Lucky to have been getting paid to do what I love since I was in high school which I thank completely to the fact that no one asks you how old you are when using freelance dev websites.

Currently obsessed with the weird connections between philosophy, nutrition and fitness, and computer science.

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Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Aug 2016 → Aug 2016 (1 month)

I really value being able to take ideas into action quickly. This is a command line utility which lets me quickly "bootstrap" new websites so I can focus on the actual thing I want to work on, not the initial setup.

I really value being able to take ideas into action quickly. This is a command line utility which lets me quickly "bootstrap" new websites so I can focus on the actual thing I want to work on, not the initial setup.

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Position Aug 2013 → Feb 2014 (7 months)
Software Developer at Stack Exchange
  • Worked on a very small team to develop and launch Stack Exchange's Android application.
  • When I joined the app was already in progress, but we ended up redoing a lot of it to use proper Android architecture and standards.
  • The application architecture is mostly a single Activity which toggles different Fragments inside of it for the view. We don't share the same UI for phone and tablet but we share a lot of the base code.
  • The most fun part was how in-the-open we did testing and the initial launch. Checkout a talk I gave about the entire process: http://kasrarahjerdi.com/se-goes-mobile/
  • Following the release of the newest Mario Kart game we got a Wii U for the office and my friends and I played after lunch every day for weeks. I ended up making a box with a 100cm red button that when tapped texted a opted in list of coworkers "Hey buddy, you're working too hard, come play some video games!" -- You could say I'm a distraction to others.
  • Worked on a very small team to develop and launch Stack Exchange's Android application.
  • When I joined the app was already in progress, but we ended up redoing a lot of it to use proper Android architecture and standards.
  • The application architecture is mostly a single Activity which toggles different Fragments inside of it for the view. We don't share the same UI for phone and tablet but we share a lot of the base code.
  • The most fun part was how in-the-open we did testing and the initial launch. Checkout a talk I gave about the entire process: http://kasrarahjerdi.com/se-goes-mobile/
  • Following the release of the newest Mario Kart game we got a Wii U for the office and my friends and I played after lunch every day for weeks. I ended up making a box with a 100cm red button that when tapped texted a opted in list of coworkers "Hey buddy, you're working too hard, come play some video games!" -- You could say I'm a distraction to others.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position May 2012 → Aug 2013 (1 year, 4 months)
Software Engineer at Fitocracy
  • My first real start-up! I was employee #3, I believe? Maybe 4, depending on how you count.
  • Joined the team as a summer intern working on the website. Accepted a full-time offer at the end of my internship.
  • During my first week I refactored our entire OAuth flows for login with Facebook/Twitter/etc. I replaced the old buggy plugin with a home-built solution which we used years later to add on extra sign in options.
  • Accidentally started making my own Android app (we were web/ios-only at the time) during the tail-end of 2012, launched it Q1 2013.
  • At our biggest we were a start-up of eight, so everyone did everything. Outside of the points above, I also participated heavily in road-mapping the product and our timeline, monetization strategies, and yes, AWS instance management. I know a lot about the cheapest ways to use AWS.

During my time at Fitocracy I learned so much about the importance of engagement and retention, and I got hooked on testing ideas cheaply and quickly.

Talk to me about the time I got tired of our repeated internal discussions about the possibility and architecture of adding a private messaging system, and made a real-time messaging system myself in a weekend instead. It shocked me how much easier all the "should we do this? how should we do this?" conversations were once we all had something to actually point to regarding what "this" is.

  • My first real start-up! I was employee #3, I believe? Maybe 4, depending on how you count.
  • Joined the team as a summer intern working on the website. Accepted a full-time offer at the end of my internship.
  • During my first week I refactored our entire OAuth flows for login with Facebook/Twitter/etc. I replaced the old buggy plugin with a home-built solution which we used years later to add on extra sign in options.
  • Accidentally started making my own Android app (we were web/ios-only at the time) during the tail-end of 2012, launched it Q1 2013.
  • At our biggest we were a start-up of eight, so everyone did everything. Outside of the points above, I also participated heavily in road-mapping the product and our timeline, monetization strategies, and yes, AWS instance management. I know a lot about the cheapest ways to use AWS.

During my time at Fitocracy I learned so much about the importance of engagement and retention, and I got hooked on testing ideas cheaply and quickly.

Talk to me about the time I got tired of our repeated internal discussions about the possibility and architecture of adding a private messaging system, and made a real-time messaging system myself in a weekend instead. It shocked me how much easier all the "should we do this? how should we do this?" conversations were once we all had something to actually point to regarding what "this" is.

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Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Nov 2011 → Mar 2012 (5 months)
Android Engineer at Airbiquity
  • Worked on a very small team (two people, including myself) to develop and release an Android app for Ford's electric vehicle, the entire project (including website and iOS application) won a Best of Innovation award at CES in 2012.
  • Mobile responsibilities ranged from turning beautiful designs and animations into pixel-perfect code, creating a stable and maintainable architecture for the app, and routine work alongside our iOS team to ensure feature parity.
  • While working here I learned that the best way to report a bug to the back-end team is to send them a bug description and a .patch file for a possible fix.
  • Fought with IBM ClearCase every day. Please don't make me use this ever again in my life. Please.
  • Worked on a very small team (two people, including myself) to develop and release an Android app for Ford's electric vehicle, the entire project (including website and iOS application) won a Best of Innovation award at CES in 2012.
  • Mobile responsibilities ranged from turning beautiful designs and animations into pixel-perfect code, creating a stable and maintainable architecture for the app, and routine work alongside our iOS team to ensure feature parity.
  • While working here I learned that the best way to report a bug to the back-end team is to send them a bug description and a .patch file for a possible fix.
  • Fought with IBM ClearCase every day. Please don't make me use this ever again in my life. Please.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Dec 2010 → Dec 2011 (1 year, 1 month)
Developer at Playteau
  • Worked on both backend for social games (think FB/other-social-networks-that-shuttered games) and the actual Actionscript code for multiple games.
  • Everything I did was user-facing from combining internal and external feedback and prioritizing it to developing new games and helping manage our SQL instances.
  • Talk to me about the time we migrated the entire DB from MyISAM to InnoDB without any downtime.
  • Worked on both backend for social games (think FB/other-social-networks-that-shuttered games) and the actual Actionscript code for multiple games.
  • Everything I did was user-facing from combining internal and external feedback and prioritizing it to developing new games and helping manage our SQL instances.
  • Talk to me about the time we migrated the entire DB from MyISAM to InnoDB without any downtime.

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11
Top post Oct 2010

Recommended reading

by Tony Hsieh

It took me a long time to learn that even companies that have good products might be a mess on the inside. Tony's retelling of the Zappos story was very eye-opening and the culture they have is one I aspire to be around.

It took me a long time to learn that even companies that have good products might be a mess on the inside. Tony's retelling of the Zappos story was very eye-opening and the culture they have is one I aspire to be around.

by Steve McConnell

I don't even know why I added this to the list, who hasn't read this? Since I'm a non-professionally trained engineer I look back on Steve's lessons the same way I imagine most people do to their teachers.

I don't even know why I added this to the list, who hasn't read this? Since I'm a non-professionally trained engineer I look back on Steve's lessons the same way I imagine most people do to their teachers.

by Edgar H. Schein

I think this is technically more a textbook than a book-book, but it's one of the most important books in the world to me.

I think this is technically more a textbook than a book-book, but it's one of the most important books in the world to me.

Kasra Rahjerdi

New York, NY, United States http://www.kasrarahjerdi.com

Passionate about everything I do (why else do them?), only focused on getting things done. Simple as that.

I absolutely love working on things that are designed to help people make their day-to-day life better. I like to think the term "Product Minded Developer" describes me well.

I develop by prioritizing the user's response to my product over just the beauty of the code. I only work on products I can completely engross myself into. It's all about the default processes and routines, not just what's possible. I dislike the actual act of programming, but I love making things and I'm pretty good at programming so it works out.

I have a lot esoteric interest and hobbies, this intro talk on IoT goes through some of them. Just know that if you ask me about any of the things I mention in that video I will talk until you fall asleep or walk away.

Please don't contact me if I would be the only ethnic person at your company.

Technical Skills

Likes: python flask android swift java javascript amazon-web-services
Dislikes: c#

Experience

Feb 2014 → Current Mobile Team Lead Stack Exchange
android, ios, git, teamcity, gradle
  • After the launch of the Stack Exchange Android and iOS applications I moved into a team lead role.
  • Responsibilities include all my regular developer responsibilities alongside putting on a marketing hat or a product manager hat and any other hats I can find.
  • I started focusing on mentorship and education a lot more. Everything from being a regular guest lecturer at coding bootcamps (I've taught people Ruby and I don't use Ruby, isn't that weird?) to doing 1-on-1 mentorship and guidance.
  • Watch this video to see my thoughts on mobile development and best ways to get started: Careers in Android™: Mobile's Future & You. I'm on the panel and start talking at around the 25 min mark.
  • All product feedback at Stack Exchange is public and in the open, browse through my Meta Stack Exchange account to see my responses/interactions with the community: http://meta.stackexchange.com/users/229741/kasra-rahjerdi. This is probably the most addicting part of working at Stack Exchange, no where else can I just talk to my users in the open and have them help me prioritize my bugs and features.
Aug 2013 → Feb 2014 Software Developer Stack Exchange
android, google-play-services, mercurial, teamcity, beta-testing
  • Worked on a very small team to develop and launch Stack Exchange's Android application.
  • When I joined the app was already in progress, but we ended up redoing a lot of it to use proper Android architecture and standards.
  • The application architecture is mostly a single Activity which toggles different Fragments inside of it for the view. We don't share the same UI for phone and tablet but we share a lot of the base code.
  • The most fun part was how in-the-open we did testing and the initial launch. Checkout a talk I gave about the entire process: http://kasrarahjerdi.com/se-goes-mobile/
  • Following the release of the newest Mario Kart game we got a Wii U for the office and my friends and I played after lunch every day for weeks. I ended up making a box with a 100cm red button that when tapped texted a opted in list of coworkers "Hey buddy, you're working too hard, come play some video games!" -- You could say I'm a distraction to others.
May 2012 → Aug 2013 Software Engineer Fitocracy
python, django, javascript, jquery, mysql, amazon-web-services, amazon-ec2
  • My first real start-up! I was employee #3, I believe? Maybe 4, depending on how you count.
  • Joined the team as a summer intern working on the website. Accepted a full-time offer at the end of my internship.
  • During my first week I refactored our entire OAuth flows for login with Facebook/Twitter/etc. I replaced the old buggy plugin with a home-built solution which we used years later to add on extra sign in options.
  • Accidentally started making my own Android app (we were web/ios-only at the time) during the tail-end of 2012, launched it Q1 2013.
  • At our biggest we were a start-up of eight, so everyone did everything. Outside of the points above, I also participated heavily in road-mapping the product and our timeline, monetization strategies, and yes, AWS instance management. I know a lot about the cheapest ways to use AWS.

During my time at Fitocracy I learned so much about the importance of engagement and retention, and I got hooked on testing ideas cheaply and quickly.

Talk to me about the time I got tired of our repeated internal discussions about the possibility and architecture of adding a private messaging system, and made a real-time messaging system myself in a weekend instead. It shocked me how much easier all the "should we do this? how should we do this?" conversations were once we all had something to actually point to regarding what "this" is.

Nov 2011 → Mar 2012 Android Engineer Airbiquity
android, jsf, clearcase
  • Worked on a very small team (two people, including myself) to develop and release an Android app for Ford's electric vehicle, the entire project (including website and iOS application) won a Best of Innovation award at CES in 2012.
  • Mobile responsibilities ranged from turning beautiful designs and animations into pixel-perfect code, creating a stable and maintainable architecture for the app, and routine work alongside our iOS team to ensure feature parity.
  • While working here I learned that the best way to report a bug to the back-end team is to send them a bug description and a .patch file for a possible fix.
  • Fought with IBM ClearCase every day. Please don't make me use this ever again in my life. Please.
Dec 2010 → Dec 2011 Developer Playteau
flash, actionscript-3, php, mysql
  • Worked on both backend for social games (think FB/other-social-networks-that-shuttered games) and the actual Actionscript code for multiple games.
  • Everything I did was user-facing from combining internal and external feedback and prioritizing it to developing new games and helping manage our SQL instances.
  • Talk to me about the time we migrated the entire DB from MyISAM to InnoDB without any downtime.

Projects & Interests

Oct 2010 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/472021/kasra-rahjerdi
Written 46 answers. Active in android and java.
Sep 2013 → Current snapchat-python https://github.com/jc4p/snapchat-python
python, reverse-engineering, encryption

A Python read-only front-end for Snapchat

Honestly I just really like reverse engineering. I created this project as a result of both reading the web calls the regular app made using a MITM attack on my own devices, and decompiling the android app's code and reading the opcodes (.dex to .java converters exist but they don't do well at complex methods).

Sep 2013 → Current stack-quiz https://github.com/jc4p/stack-quiz
python, javascript, jquery, web-scraping, beautifulsoup

an employee recognition app for Stack Exchange

Originally made as a personal project to help myself learn the names of my fellow co-workers but has ended up being useful to others (specially new hires). It's technically a Django app due to legacy reasons but the vast majority of the code I actually wrote (i.e. ignoring framework code) is javascript, hoping to use this as an example project to get some node.js experience when I find the time.

Aug 2011 → Current google-voice-twitter-messenger https://github.com/jc4p/google-voice-twitter-messenger
python, imap, twitter

A simple service which periodically checks a Gmail account using IMAP and tweets any new messages. Created to give a group an easy way to all tweet using the same account while on the go, before all the new fancy tools that let you do that existed.

Aug 2016 → Aug 2016 quickstart https://github.com/jc4p/quickstart
node, npm, shell

I really value being able to take ideas into action quickly. This is a command line utility which lets me quickly "bootstrap" new websites so I can focus on the actual thing I want to work on, not the initial setup.

Public Artifacts

The process is part of failure. — Kasra Rahjerdi http://kasrarahjerdi.com/2016/07/the-process-is-part-of-failure/

I like failing. This blog posts explains why :)

Apps & Software

Stack Exchange - Android Apps on Google Play https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.stackexchange.marvin
android, java

Stack Exchange for Android

Fitocracy | The Fitness Social Network To Level Up In Real Life https://www.fitocracy.com/
django, python, javascript, jquery, redis, mysql, nginx

The best fitness community on the planet.

Fitocracy Fitness Game,Tracker - Android Apps on Google Play https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.fitocracy.app
android, python, java, django, sqlite

The official Android app for Fitocracy.

For the first few versions, sole dev. Made entirety of app from initial prototypes to production release in around 4 months.

Others

Background Background

Moved to the states when I was 10, spent my childhood growing up in that weird area between not-quite-first-generation-American and not-quite-immigrant.

Lucky to have been getting paid to do what I love since I was in high school which I thank completely to the fact that no one asks you how old you are when using freelance dev websites.

Currently obsessed with the weird connections between philosophy, nutrition and fitness, and computer science.

Readings

Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose Tony Hsieh http://www.amazon.com/Delivering-Happiness-Profits-Passion-Purpose/dp/0446576220%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0446576220

It took me a long time to learn that even companies that have good products might be a mess on the inside. Tony's retelling of the Zappos story was very eye-opening and the culture they have is one I aspire to be around.

Code Complete: A Practical Handbook of Software Construction, Second Edition Steve McConnell http://www.amazon.com/Code-Complete-Practical-Handbook-Construction/dp/0735619670%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0735619670

I don't even know why I added this to the list, who hasn't read this? Since I'm a non-professionally trained engineer I look back on Steve's lessons the same way I imagine most people do to their teachers.

The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition Don Norman http://www.amazon.com/The-Design-Everyday-Things-Expanded/dp/0465050654%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0465050654
Organizational Culture and Leadership Edgar H. Schein http://www.amazon.com/Organizational-Culture-Leadership-Edgar-Schein/dp/0470190604

I think this is technically more a textbook than a book-book, but it's one of the most important books in the world to me.

Tools

First Computer: Compaq Presario 5000 with 256MB PC100 RAM. A Command & Conquer beast.
Favorite Editor: Nano, due to a LONG time teaching my mom how to use pico when she was at the U of WA