Print

Pieter Venter

Team Lead at Freedom Tech

I've been working within the Javascript ecosystem for the past couple of years. I've worked with small startups and corporate companies. I have worked on small and large teams, quick MVP products and large enterprise solutions. After working for a bunch of companies here in SA for 5 years, I took the next step in my career to work for companies all over the world, freelancing in various team sizes working remotely.

I have worked on several technologies such as .NET C#, Python, Ruby on Rails and PHP, but the one language I believe to be the one true ring to rule them all is JavaScript. Check out Geoff Schmidt's video on JavaScript State of the Union. No other language is capable of being isomorphic and run on every single device. From Desktop to browser to server to Mobile all the way to IoT (internet of things) devices. Due to the browser wars between Mozilla, Google and Microsoft for the past decade, JavaScript has exploded!

I have solid experience with the full stack. From developing databases and generating the relationship between tables/collections on SQL and NoSQL (e.g. Mongo) database solutions, to coding the domain layer and business logic on the server all the way to designing the pages on the UI and tweaking the styles to create the perfect user experience. I've done them all. However, my true speciality lies in the middle between the UX Designer and the DBA, working with business logic, defining the API and what data to send across to the UI. Creating controllers (in an MVP structure) or component logic (in web components), handling and manipulating the data that get sent across. Some people call it the Integration layer. I like to look at it as handling the communication between all the various parts in the system. Every component is different and needs data in a different format for optimal performance. Some components need to sort a list, others need to save a form but do validation first and the data structure of the in-memory objects matter if one wants the app to feel native and have real-time performance. That being said, tools such as RxJS, Redux, Firebase and Lodash are super important when it comes to creating the perfect application.

I also believe in using tools around the team to increase productivity so that the developers can focus on the code itself. Having tools such as Webpack to do hot-reloading saves a heck of a lot of time. Having Linting tools to warn you about potential errors and intellisense to autocomplete your code is priceless. Creating a CI (continuous integration) system not only to automatically build and push out code but also to immediately notify the team of a bad code push can save a company from losing all of its customer-base overnight. Using methodologies such as Agile development and tools such as Trello or Zenhub to do sprint planning and issue reporting goes a long way into keeping a team productive and keeping the source of truth in one easily searchable place is very important. Gone are the days where developers can spend their mornings going through emails between various key-players and stakeholders in the project. ##How I keep my skills sharp I like to stay up to date with the latest cutting-edge technologies. In order to do that, I spend a lot of my private time going through blogs and videos of various technologies. I read hackernews, I watch videos such as Google I/O, FireCasts and Meteor Devshop.

I keep my eyes on GitHub and projects that grow fast in the number of downloads and stars. The new up-and-coming repositories I open up, clone to my local dev environment and then play around with it. I try and build apps on a regular basis, even if its something that's already out there on the market, just so I can play around with the new latest technologies.

I attend meetups and hackathons on a regular basis. I try and build my network on like-minded people and stay in touch with them. To name a few I've recently attended: Cape Town DevOps, Cape Town Software Developers, Startup Grind and React Cape Town

Whenever I drive in traffic or long distance I tend to open up a podcast of JavaScript Air

I've been working within the Javascript ecosystem for the past couple of years. I've worked with small startups and corporate companies. I have worked on small and large teams, quick MVP products and large enterprise solutions. After working for a bunch of companies here in SA for 5 years, I took the next step in my career to work for companies all over the world, freelancing in various team sizes working remotely.

I have worked on several technologies such as .NET C#, Python, Ruby on Rails and PHP, but the one language I believe to be the one true ring to rule them all is JavaScript. Check out Geoff Schmidt's video on JavaScript State of the Union. No other language is capable of being isomorphic and run on every single device. From Desktop to browser to server to Mobile all the way to IoT (internet of things) devices. Due to the browser wars between Mozilla, Google and Microsoft for the past decade, JavaScript has exploded!

I have solid experience with the full stack. From developing databases and generating the relationship between tables/collections on SQL and NoSQL (e.g. Mongo) database solutions, to coding the domain layer and business logic on the server all the way to designing the pages on the UI and tweaking the styles to create the perfect user experience. I've done them all. However, my true speciality lies in the middle between the UX Designer and the DBA, working with business logic, defining the API and what data to send across to the UI. Creating controllers (in an MVP structure) or component logic (in web components), handling and manipulating the data that get sent across. Some people call it the Integration layer. I like to look at it as handling the communication between all the various parts in the system. Every component is different and needs data in a different format for optimal performance. Some components need to sort a list, others need to save a form but do validation first and the data structure of the in-memory objects matter if one wants the app to feel native and have real-time performance. That being said, tools such as RxJS, Redux, Firebase and Lodash are super important when it comes to creating the perfect application.

I also believe in using tools around the team to increase productivity so that the developers can focus on the code itself. Having tools such as Webpack to do hot-reloading saves a heck of a lot of time. Having Linting tools to warn you about potential errors and intellisense to autocomplete your code is priceless. Creating a CI (continuous integration) system not only to automatically build and push out code but also to immediately notify the team of a bad code push can save a company from losing all of its customer-base overnight. Using methodologies such as Agile development and tools such as Trello or Zenhub to do sprint planning and issue reporting goes a long way into keeping a team productive and keeping the source of truth in one easily searchable place is very important. Gone are the days where developers can spend their mornings going through emails between various key-players and stakeholders in the project. ##How I keep my skills sharp I like to stay up to date with the latest cutting-edge technologies. In order to do that, I spend a lot of my private time going through blogs and videos of various technologies. I read hackernews, I watch videos such as Google I/O, FireCasts and Meteor Devshop.

I keep my eyes on GitHub and projects that grow fast in the number of downloads and stars. The new up-and-coming repositories I open up, clone to my local dev environment and then play around with it. I try and build apps on a regular basis, even if its something that's already out there on the market, just so I can play around with the new latest technologies.

I attend meetups and hackathons on a regular basis. I try and build my network on like-minded people and stay in touch with them. To name a few I've recently attended: Cape Town DevOps, Cape Town Software Developers, Startup Grind and React Cape Town

Whenever I drive in traffic or long distance I tend to open up a podcast of JavaScript Air

Favorite editor: Webstorm • First computer: Intel 386 SX

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position 2018 → Current (1 year, 8 months)
Team Lead at Freedom Tech

Leading a team of 6 devs at a FinTech startup, based in Cape Town, that will disrupt the Insurance and Banking industry.

Leading a team of 6 devs at a FinTech startup, based in Cape Town, that will disrupt the Insurance and Banking industry.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Jun 2018 → Jun 2018 (1 month)

🖥 Chrome automation made simple. Runs locally or headless on AWS Lambda.

🖥 Chrome automation made simple. Runs locally or headless on AWS Lambda.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Apr 2017 → Apr 2018 (1 year, 1 month)
CTO at Flexyforce

Flexy Product 1.0 was built by a team of developers with Meteor. Those developers soon after parted ways. The product wasn't stable and had a lot of issues. I got hired to rescue to the product. I decided to rather do a rewrite than to try and salvage the broken code.

I spent 5 months of 250+ hours a month to single handedly write Flexy Product 2.0, which launched and has since rebranded as flexyforce.com.

The stack I used is Node.JS, GraphQL with Apollo, React, Next.JS, Auth0, Webtask (serverless functions), Redux and Styled Components.

Flexy Product 1.0 was built by a team of developers with Meteor. Those developers soon after parted ways. The product wasn't stable and had a lot of issues. I got hired to rescue to the product. I decided to rather do a rewrite than to try and salvage the broken code.

I spent 5 months of 250+ hours a month to single handedly write Flexy Product 2.0, which launched and has since rebranded as flexyforce.com.

The stack I used is Node.JS, GraphQL with Apollo, React, Next.JS, Auth0, Webtask (serverless functions), Redux and Styled Components.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Feb 2015 → Jun 2017 (2 years, 5 months)
Software Consulting at Upwork

For the period of 2015-2017 I have worked for various startups around the globe in the comfort of my own home. I have worked through agencies such as Upwork Pro, Toptal and ODesk.

Some of the projects that immediately come to mind are things such as Chalkup.co and Eris Industries (now Monax.io). I've worked primarily with Angular, React and Meteor on the front-end and Node.JS on the backend. I have from time to time done some PHP, Ruby and .NET gigs but my focus has been with JavaScript.

I have worked on the entire stack and different phases of the companies

For the period of 2015-2017 I have worked for various startups around the globe in the comfort of my own home. I have worked through agencies such as Upwork Pro, Toptal and ODesk.

Some of the projects that immediately come to mind are things such as Chalkup.co and Eris Industries (now Monax.io). I've worked primarily with Angular, React and Meteor on the front-end and Node.JS on the backend. I have from time to time done some PHP, Ruby and .NET gigs but my focus has been with JavaScript.

I have worked on the entire stack and different phases of the companies

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Jun 2014 → Feb 2015 (9 months)
Software Engineer at Ogilvy

Several projects for their clients such as KFC where we automated their entire process from creating a product with a simple drag and drop, to assigning it to designers to perfect the different images for the various regions and pricings, all the way to annotating and launching a product directly in the store on the digital screens. Technologies used include .NET, Microsoft SQL, AngularJS, Bootstrap, NodeJS and Ionic.

Several projects for their clients such as KFC where we automated their entire process from creating a product with a simple drag and drop, to assigning it to designers to perfect the different images for the various regions and pricings, all the way to annotating and launching a product directly in the store on the digital screens. Technologies used include .NET, Microsoft SQL, AngularJS, Bootstrap, NodeJS and Ionic.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Jan 2012 → Jun 2014 (2 years, 6 months)
Software Engineer at MiX Telematics

I have worked on the full product life cycle of a project called DynaMIX. I was handpicked out of 900+ employees into a team that we liked to call "The A-Team". We were taken off-site for a year to work in a highly productive environment with a huge bonus as incentive for us to do the impossible: To take a full stack of legacy code done primarily on visual basics dating back to the company's initial startup period in the 90's and to create a perfect platform from the groun up where we can rebuild their entire stack, along with the platfrom within a year's time.

We worked long hours, sometimes going through the night or even through an entire weekend of just coding day and night, but we did it: We achieved the impossible. We have rebuilt 20+ years worth of legacy code with modern technologies. Not only did we rebuild it, but we created our own internal framework and platform to quickly build new features and products on top of within a matter of weeks.

Technologies used include JavaScript, C# .NET, SQL, AngularJS and Bootstrap

I have worked on the full product life cycle of a project called DynaMIX. I was handpicked out of 900+ employees into a team that we liked to call "The A-Team". We were taken off-site for a year to work in a highly productive environment with a huge bonus as incentive for us to do the impossible: To take a full stack of legacy code done primarily on visual basics dating back to the company's initial startup period in the 90's and to create a perfect platform from the groun up where we can rebuild their entire stack, along with the platfrom within a year's time.

We worked long hours, sometimes going through the night or even through an entire weekend of just coding day and night, but we did it: We achieved the impossible. We have rebuilt 20+ years worth of legacy code with modern technologies. Not only did we rebuild it, but we created our own internal framework and platform to quickly build new features and products on top of within a matter of weeks.

Technologies used include JavaScript, C# .NET, SQL, AngularJS and Bootstrap

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Education Jan 2009 → Dec 2011

Recommended reading

by Geoff Schmidt

Geoff Schmidt talks about the state of JavaScript in 2015 and where it is going. He spoke about how the browser wars of the 90's got JavaScript to evolve a lot faster than other languages at the time and then the open source community took it further. Today npm packages are downloaded over 10x more than any other language out there and the registry also contains much more than any other language's package manager.

Javascript is also able to run everywhere: web, mobile, server, cron jobs, IoT devices and VR/AR.

Geoff Schmidt talks about the state of JavaScript in 2015 and where it is going. He spoke about how the browser wars of the 90's got JavaScript to evolve a lot faster than other languages at the time and then the open source community took it further. Today npm packages are downloaded over 10x more than any other language out there and the registry also contains much more than any other language's package manager.

Javascript is also able to run everywhere: web, mobile, server, cron jobs, IoT devices and VR/AR.

Pieter Venter

I've been working within the Javascript ecosystem for the past couple of years. I've worked with small startups and corporate companies. I have worked on small and large teams, quick MVP products and large enterprise solutions. After working for a bunch of companies here in SA for 5 years, I took the next step in my career to work for companies all over the world, freelancing in various team sizes working remotely.

I have worked on several technologies such as .NET C#, Python, Ruby on Rails and PHP, but the one language I believe to be the one true ring to rule them all is JavaScript. Check out Geoff Schmidt's video on JavaScript State of the Union. No other language is capable of being isomorphic and run on every single device. From Desktop to browser to server to Mobile all the way to IoT (internet of things) devices. Due to the browser wars between Mozilla, Google and Microsoft for the past decade, JavaScript has exploded!

I have solid experience with the full stack. From developing databases and generating the relationship between tables/collections on SQL and NoSQL (e.g. Mongo) database solutions, to coding the domain layer and business logic on the server all the way to designing the pages on the UI and tweaking the styles to create the perfect user experience. I've done them all. However, my true speciality lies in the middle between the UX Designer and the DBA, working with business logic, defining the API and what data to send across to the UI. Creating controllers (in an MVP structure) or component logic (in web components), handling and manipulating the data that get sent across. Some people call it the Integration layer. I like to look at it as handling the communication between all the various parts in the system. Every component is different and needs data in a different format for optimal performance. Some components need to sort a list, others need to save a form but do validation first and the data structure of the in-memory objects matter if one wants the app to feel native and have real-time performance. That being said, tools such as RxJS, Redux, Firebase and Lodash are super important when it comes to creating the perfect application.

I also believe in using tools around the team to increase productivity so that the developers can focus on the code itself. Having tools such as Webpack to do hot-reloading saves a heck of a lot of time. Having Linting tools to warn you about potential errors and intellisense to autocomplete your code is priceless. Creating a CI (continuous integration) system not only to automatically build and push out code but also to immediately notify the team of a bad code push can save a company from losing all of its customer-base overnight. Using methodologies such as Agile development and tools such as Trello or Zenhub to do sprint planning and issue reporting goes a long way into keeping a team productive and keeping the source of truth in one easily searchable place is very important. Gone are the days where developers can spend their mornings going through emails between various key-players and stakeholders in the project. ##How I keep my skills sharp I like to stay up to date with the latest cutting-edge technologies. In order to do that, I spend a lot of my private time going through blogs and videos of various technologies. I read hackernews, I watch videos such as Google I/O, FireCasts and Meteor Devshop.

I keep my eyes on GitHub and projects that grow fast in the number of downloads and stars. The new up-and-coming repositories I open up, clone to my local dev environment and then play around with it. I try and build apps on a regular basis, even if its something that's already out there on the market, just so I can play around with the new latest technologies.

I attend meetups and hackathons on a regular basis. I try and build my network on like-minded people and stay in touch with them. To name a few I've recently attended: Cape Town DevOps, Cape Town Software Developers, Startup Grind and React Cape Town

Whenever I drive in traffic or long distance I tend to open up a podcast of JavaScript Air

Technical Skills

Likes: javascript reactjs redux graphql apollo node.js
Dislikes: c# python php

Experience

2018 → Current Team Lead Freedom Tech
javascript, node.js, reactjs, react-native, apollo, graphql, koa

Leading a team of 6 devs at a FinTech startup, based in Cape Town, that will disrupt the Insurance and Banking industry.

Apr 2017 → Apr 2018 CTO Flexyforce
reactjs, redux, graphql, apollo, prisma, next.js, node.js, javascript, html, css, styled-components, webtask, zeit-now

Flexy Product 1.0 was built by a team of developers with Meteor. Those developers soon after parted ways. The product wasn't stable and had a lot of issues. I got hired to rescue to the product. I decided to rather do a rewrite than to try and salvage the broken code.

I spent 5 months of 250+ hours a month to single handedly write Flexy Product 2.0, which launched and has since rebranded as flexyforce.com.

The stack I used is Node.JS, GraphQL with Apollo, React, Next.JS, Auth0, Webtask (serverless functions), Redux and Styled Components.

Feb 2015 → Jun 2017 Software Consulting Upwork
react-native, reactjs, redux, meteor, apollo, next.js, javascript, ionic-framework, flutter, dart, node.js, koa, express, graphql, postgraphile, prisma, css, angular, vue.js

For the period of 2015-2017 I have worked for various startups around the globe in the comfort of my own home. I have worked through agencies such as Upwork Pro, Toptal and ODesk.

Some of the projects that immediately come to mind are things such as Chalkup.co and Eris Industries (now Monax.io). I've worked primarily with Angular, React and Meteor on the front-end and Node.JS on the backend. I have from time to time done some PHP, Ruby and .NET gigs but my focus has been with JavaScript.

I have worked on the entire stack and different phases of the companies

Jun 2014 → Feb 2015 Software Engineer Ogilvy
c#, .net, angular, javascript, twitter-bootstrap, css, ionic-framework, node.js

Several projects for their clients such as KFC where we automated their entire process from creating a product with a simple drag and drop, to assigning it to designers to perfect the different images for the various regions and pricings, all the way to annotating and launching a product directly in the store on the digital screens. Technologies used include .NET, Microsoft SQL, AngularJS, Bootstrap, NodeJS and Ionic.

Jan 2012 → Jun 2014 Software Engineer MiX Telematics
angularjs, javascript, c#, .net, sql, twitter-bootstrap

I have worked on the full product life cycle of a project called DynaMIX. I was handpicked out of 900+ employees into a team that we liked to call "The A-Team". We were taken off-site for a year to work in a highly productive environment with a huge bonus as incentive for us to do the impossible: To take a full stack of legacy code done primarily on visual basics dating back to the company's initial startup period in the 90's and to create a perfect platform from the groun up where we can rebuild their entire stack, along with the platfrom within a year's time.

We worked long hours, sometimes going through the night or even through an entire weekend of just coding day and night, but we did it: We achieved the impossible. We have rebuilt 20+ years worth of legacy code with modern technologies. Not only did we rebuild it, but we created our own internal framework and platform to quickly build new features and products on top of within a matter of weeks.

Technologies used include JavaScript, C# .NET, SQL, AngularJS and Bootstrap

Education

Jan 2009 → Dec 2011 Information Systems Management Stellenbosch University

Projects & Interests

Jun 2018 → Jun 2018 cyrus-za/chromeless https://github.com/cyrus-za/chromeless

🖥 Chrome automation made simple. Runs locally or headless on AWS Lambda.

Readings

JavaScript State of the Union -- Devshop SF July 2015 Geoff Schmidt https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G2SMVIUNNk

Geoff Schmidt talks about the state of JavaScript in 2015 and where it is going. He spoke about how the browser wars of the 90's got JavaScript to evolve a lot faster than other languages at the time and then the open source community took it further. Today npm packages are downloaded over 10x more than any other language out there and the registry also contains much more than any other language's package manager.

Javascript is also able to run everywhere: web, mobile, server, cron jobs, IoT devices and VR/AR.

Tools

First Computer: Intel 386 SX
Favorite Editor: Webstorm