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Ryan Funduk

https://ryanfunduk.com
Last active on Stack Overflow today
Favorite editor: Sublime Text 3 (but vim holds a special place in my heart :)) • First computer: Zenith Z-171 (really)
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Position Jul 2012 → Current (6 years, 6 months)
Co-founder at CourseCraft

This is a project based on an idea my wife had for an easier way to run an e-course - not just without wordpress plugins, shared passwords, private facebook groups and so on, but also without needing approval or paying 30%+ in fees like some of the alternatives. It should be as easy as making an Etsy store.

I am the primary developer and manager of this project. Everything from provisioning/setting up servers to developing the app itself from scratch was done by me. My wife handles most of the graphic design, blogging/twitter stuff, marketing/promotion, and support.

This is a project based on an idea my wife had for an easier way to run an e-course - not just without wordpress plugins, shared passwords, private facebook groups and so on, but also without needing approval or paying 30%+ in fees like some of the alternatives. It should be as easy as making an Etsy store.

I am the primary developer and manager of this project. Everything from provisioning/setting up servers to developing the app itself from scratch was done by me. My wife handles most of the graphic design, blogging/twitter stuff, marketing/promotion, and support.

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Position 2009 → Current (10 years)
Co-founder at Bugrocket, Inc.

This is a side-project-turned-company. I wrote initial prototypes and experimented only a few hours a week at first. Eventually it was feeling pretty solid and now you can use it too :)

Things like setting up proper infrastructure (AWS) from scratch and incorporating the company (I had 3 investors who helped with that) were outside of my experience and comfort zone at the time. Bugrocket has been a huge learning experience for me.

This is a side-project-turned-company. I wrote initial prototypes and experimented only a few hours a week at first. Eventually it was feeling pretty solid and now you can use it too :)

Things like setting up proper infrastructure (AWS) from scratch and incorporating the company (I had 3 investors who helped with that) were outside of my experience and comfort zone at the time. Bugrocket has been a huge learning experience for me.

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Feature or Apps

The easiest way to create an e-course and sell it. CourseCraft is half-way between a curated, approval based e-course creator like Udemy and spending time and money setting up a custom blog with access controls and a shopping cart.

It hosts your course, provides tools to write it (along with image/video uploads, etc) and handles payments on your behalf - all for a mere 5% cut of the revenue.

Founder/Primary Developer

The easiest way to create an e-course and sell it. CourseCraft is half-way between a curated, approval based e-course creator like Udemy and spending time and money setting up a custom blog with access controls and a shopping cart.

It hosts your course, provides tools to write it (along with image/video uploads, etc) and handles payments on your behalf - all for a mere 5% cut of the revenue.

Founder/Primary Developer

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Feature or Apps

Bugrocket is a fast, lean, hassle-free bug tracker. Built from the ground up to keep out of your way and let you get back to work.

Founder/Primary Developer

Bugrocket is a fast, lean, hassle-free bug tracker. Built from the ground up to keep out of your way and let you get back to work.

Founder/Primary Developer

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Open source Sep 2015 → Current (3 years, 3 months)

Redux/React/Webpack solitaire card game.

Learning project re-creating a cool solitaire card game with fancy new JS ecosystem tools.

Redux/React/Webpack solitaire card game.

Learning project re-creating a cool solitaire card game with fancy new JS ecosystem tools.

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Open source Dec 2014 → Current (4 years, 1 month)

Example app of various bits and pieces needed to build a Stripe Connect app with Ruby on Rails.

A bare-bones example application demonstrating the various bits and pieces that are needed to get a Stripe Connect application up and running.

Example app of various bits and pieces needed to build a Stripe Connect app with Ruby on Rails.

A bare-bones example application demonstrating the various bits and pieces that are needed to get a Stripe Connect application up and running.

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Open source Jul 2014 → Current (4 years, 5 months)
Last commit on Feb 20, 18
25 Commits / 13,613 ++ / 9,904 --

A 1PasswordAnywhere-like password vault built on the Dropbox Datastore API.

This is a weekend project to implement a password vault as a client-side only single-page app. It uses the Dropbox Datastore API to store encrypted passwords and a very mobile friendly design (using Twitter Bootstrap).

A 1PasswordAnywhere-like password vault built on the Dropbox Datastore API.

This is a weekend project to implement a password vault as a client-side only single-page app. It uses the Dropbox Datastore API to store encrypted passwords and a very mobile friendly design (using Twitter Bootstrap).

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Open source Mar 2013 → Current (5 years, 9 months)
Last commit on Nov 20, 17
30 Commits / 16,913 ++ / 2,073 --

A jQuery tour/walkthrough plugin.

This is a weekend project I wrote to scratch an itch for a 'developer-oriented' tour library. I was aiming to make 'the backbone.js of web tour libraries'.

I used this on Bugrocket for it's demo account feature.

A jQuery tour/walkthrough plugin.

This is a weekend project I wrote to scratch an itch for a 'developer-oriented' tour library. I was aiming to make 'the backbone.js of web tour libraries'.

I used this on Bugrocket for it's demo account feature.

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Open source Feb 2013 → Current (5 years, 11 months)

A rails engine for automatic exception handling (and an interface to view them).

I'm working on this project to provide a drop-in way to handle exceptions inside your application. For small projects something like Exceptional is overkill and expensive, and exception_notification is often too noisy and gets filtered out by most people.

Using this engine you can (or, will be able to) simply mount the viewer in your admin panel, still get emails, and have nice error pages all at once without (or, less :)) pain.

So far I've used it on CourseCraft and a few contracts.

A rails engine for automatic exception handling (and an interface to view them).

I'm working on this project to provide a drop-in way to handle exceptions inside your application. For small projects something like Exceptional is overkill and expensive, and exception_notification is often too noisy and gets filtered out by most people.

Using this engine you can (or, will be able to) simply mount the viewer in your admin panel, still get emails, and have nice error pages all at once without (or, less :)) pain.

So far I've used it on CourseCraft and a few contracts.

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Blogs or videos

There are a lot of tutorials and example code out there that binds event handlers and the like in React render functions. That's not a good idea, and this article explains why :)

There are a lot of tutorials and example code out there that binds event handlers and the like in React render functions. That's not a good idea, and this article explains why :)

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Blogs or videos

The best way to really learn something is to dig in and get your hands dirty. In this article I implement a Flux-like system from scratch using only plain JavaScript. There's also a part 2 (React from Scratch) and a part 3 (Immutable Data from Scratch).

The best way to really learn something is to dig in and get your hands dirty. In this article I implement a Flux-like system from scratch using only plain JavaScript. There's also a part 2 (React from Scratch) and a part 3 (Immutable Data from Scratch).

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Blogs or videos

An alternative style of writing client-heavy applications that doesn't involve routing and other trade-offs/major components of an 'SPA'.

An alternative style of writing client-heavy applications that doesn't involve routing and other trade-offs/major components of an 'SPA'.

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Blogs or videos

This blog post won MongoDB's March blog contest.

This blog post won MongoDB's March blog contest.

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Position Oct 2014 → Sep 2015 (1 year)
Developer Support at Stripe

Helped developers of all kinds and skill levels integrate Stripe into their site/application. Mostly via IRC and email tickets.

Also handled data migrations to/from or within Stripe when customers needed to move sensitive information between processors or to new accounts.

Occasionally worked on internal projects as well such as sample projects, or analytics.

Helped developers of all kinds and skill levels integrate Stripe into their site/application. Mostly via IRC and email tickets.

Also handled data migrations to/from or within Stripe when customers needed to move sensitive information between processors or to new accounts.

Occasionally worked on internal projects as well such as sample projects, or analytics.

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Position Jun 2013 → Jun 2014 (1 year, 1 month)
Senior Developer at Celebrations

Pingg was purchased by Celebrations, so my work continued much as it did - usually leaning towards more of the front-end. That means my work can be seen primarily in the design gallery, the designer studio and the invite creation process/main application. I did work on more behind-the-scenes stuff at times - notably, I was responsible for our internal reporting application.

During my final weeks I wrote extensive documentation of the areas I was most familiar, especially the reporting application.

Pingg was purchased by Celebrations, so my work continued much as it did - usually leaning towards more of the front-end. That means my work can be seen primarily in the design gallery, the designer studio and the invite creation process/main application. I did work on more behind-the-scenes stuff at times - notably, I was responsible for our internal reporting application.

During my final weeks I wrote extensive documentation of the areas I was most familiar, especially the reporting application.

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Position Nov 2008 → May 2013 (4 years, 7 months)
Web Developer at Pingg

At pingg I was a jack-of-all-trades usually leaning towards more of the front-end. That means my work can be seen primarily in the design gallery, the designer studio and the invite creation process/main application. I also worked on more behind-the-scenes stuff at times, and I was responsible for our internal reporting application as well.

I helped migrate from Subversion to git, prototype to jQuery and have had my hands dirtied by various other high-impact projects (such as Rails upgrades, big releases that fundamentally change the app and pingg's Yahoo! Openmail micro-app).

In September 2012 this position became 100% remote.

At pingg I was a jack-of-all-trades usually leaning towards more of the front-end. That means my work can be seen primarily in the design gallery, the designer studio and the invite creation process/main application. I also worked on more behind-the-scenes stuff at times, and I was responsible for our internal reporting application as well.

I helped migrate from Subversion to git, prototype to jQuery and have had my hands dirtied by various other high-impact projects (such as Rails upgrades, big releases that fundamentally change the app and pingg's Yahoo! Openmail micro-app).

In September 2012 this position became 100% remote.

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5
Top post Jul 2012

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Position Dec 2011 → Mar 2012 (4 months)
Developer at Minbox

I worked primarily on the front-end of the application with Backbone.js/jQuery (including much of the setup/groundwork), and also spent a fair amount of time with the various Ruby bits on the backend.

Minbox won a bunch of awards and was well received at LAUNCH Festival 2012 in San Francisco.

I worked primarily on the front-end of the application with Backbone.js/jQuery (including much of the setup/groundwork), and also spent a fair amount of time with the various Ruby bits on the backend.

Minbox won a bunch of awards and was well received at LAUNCH Festival 2012 in San Francisco.

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75
Top post Jul 2010

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39
Top post Mar 2010

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49
Top post Jan 2010

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85
Top post Dec 2009

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272
Top post Dec 2009

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Education 2005 → 2008
Software Engineering, Conestoga College

This was a 3 year program with a 16 month internship between the 2nd and 3rd years. I held 2 positions at Research In Motion over the 16 months. When returning for 3rd year the program had been changed dramatically. I left the program with an overall 3.92 GPA for courses in years 1+2.

Besides the usual kinds of projects completed at school, I took on a web development project for the college's Tech@Work show. It was a Python/Django application (this was pre-1.0!) that supported student team/project registration and management, admin back-end for booth assignment, news, and so on.

This was a 3 year program with a 16 month internship between the 2nd and 3rd years. I held 2 positions at Research In Motion over the 16 months. When returning for 3rd year the program had been changed dramatically. I left the program with an overall 3.92 GPA for courses in years 1+2.

Besides the usual kinds of projects completed at school, I took on a web development project for the college's Tech@Work show. It was a Python/Django application (this was pre-1.0!) that supported student team/project registration and management, admin back-end for booth assignment, news, and so on.

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Position May 2008 → Aug 2008 (4 months)
Static Code Analyst at Research in Motion

In the last 4 months of my internship/co-op I moved to the Static Analysis team where I worked on an internal Python framework which, like the testing, ran some nightly tests/analysis products on the codebase and reported on them.

Besides just improving the framework to make it more robust and so on, I also would often work with developers on improving the actual operating system based on results of these tools.

As the framework got solid and was performing consistently I moved into doing some more 'niceties' for people using the data. I re-wrote much of the internal web frontend (Python CGIs) to output graphs, get data via ajax, auto update and so on. In doing this I needed some modifications to the graphing library I was using (called 'flot') and forked it, improved it and maintained it for a while when the original authors weren't active.

In the last 4 months of my internship/co-op I moved to the Static Analysis team where I worked on an internal Python framework which, like the testing, ran some nightly tests/analysis products on the codebase and reported on them.

Besides just improving the framework to make it more robust and so on, I also would often work with developers on improving the actual operating system based on results of these tools.

As the framework got solid and was performing consistently I moved into doing some more 'niceties' for people using the data. I re-wrote much of the internal web frontend (Python CGIs) to output graphs, get data via ajax, auto update and so on. In doing this I needed some modifications to the graphing library I was using (called 'flot') and forked it, improved it and maintained it for a while when the original authors weren't active.

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Position May 2007 → Apr 2008 (1 year)
Embedded Systems Test Developer at Research in Motion

In this position I started off writing tests in Python which were run nightly on a cross section of RIM BlackBerry devices past-to-present. These tests would drop log files with failure/pass information and I would create a report every day on the results of the overall test suite. Occasionally a test would expose a bug of some kind either a new test finding an issue or an old one broken by a recent change, and I would report a bug using internal tools and often confer with the developer working in that area to get it fixed.

The log processing quickly became a cumbersome, monotonous task for me - so I wrote an internal web app with Rails that processed the log files and displayed graphs of results automatically, effectively removing the manual part of my job entirely.

After the first semester (4 months) doing this the primary person on the project left the company, and there was nobody to take over except me. So I became the primary and was responsible for acquiring new devices for, and dropping old devices from, the test runs as well as fixing issues with the various pieces of the setup.

I also co-ordinated the day-to-day tasks of the rest of the automated testing team, some of whom were in a different city.

In this position I started off writing tests in Python which were run nightly on a cross section of RIM BlackBerry devices past-to-present. These tests would drop log files with failure/pass information and I would create a report every day on the results of the overall test suite. Occasionally a test would expose a bug of some kind either a new test finding an issue or an old one broken by a recent change, and I would report a bug using internal tools and often confer with the developer working in that area to get it fixed.

The log processing quickly became a cumbersome, monotonous task for me - so I wrote an internal web app with Rails that processed the log files and displayed graphs of results automatically, effectively removing the manual part of my job entirely.

After the first semester (4 months) doing this the primary person on the project left the company, and there was nobody to take over except me. So I became the primary and was responsible for acquiring new devices for, and dropping old devices from, the test runs as well as fixing issues with the various pieces of the setup.

I also co-ordinated the day-to-day tasks of the rest of the automated testing team, some of whom were in a different city.

Recommended reading

by Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant

While I don't and have never really written much Perl, I found this book really enlightening and worth reading.

While I don't and have never really written much Perl, I found this book really enlightening and worth reading.

by Jeffrey E.F. Friedl

A must for any developer's bookshelf.

A must for any developer's bookshelf.

by Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson

Ryan Funduk

Waterloo, ON, Canada https://ryanfunduk.com

Technical Skills

Likes: javascript jquery reactjs redux babeljs ruby ruby-on-rails node.js backbone.js stripe-payments stripe-connect elixir phoenix-framework

Experience

Jul 2012 → Current Co-founder CourseCraft
ruby, ruby-on-rails, coffeescript, backbone.js, postgresql, stripe-payments, stripe-connect

This is a project based on an idea my wife had for an easier way to run an e-course - not just without wordpress plugins, shared passwords, private facebook groups and so on, but also without needing approval or paying 30%+ in fees like some of the alternatives. It should be as easy as making an Etsy store.

I am the primary developer and manager of this project. Everything from provisioning/setting up servers to developing the app itself from scratch was done by me. My wife handles most of the graphic design, blogging/twitter stuff, marketing/promotion, and support.

2009 → Current Co-founder Bugrocket, Inc.
ruby-on-rails, ruby, mongodb, jquery, stripe-payments

This is a side-project-turned-company. I wrote initial prototypes and experimented only a few hours a week at first. Eventually it was feeling pretty solid and now you can use it too :)

Things like setting up proper infrastructure (AWS) from scratch and incorporating the company (I had 3 investors who helped with that) were outside of my experience and comfort zone at the time. Bugrocket has been a huge learning experience for me.

Oct 2014 → Sep 2015 Developer Support Stripe
stripe-payments, ruby, javascript, python, php, ios, android, go, java, pci-dss

Helped developers of all kinds and skill levels integrate Stripe into their site/application. Mostly via IRC and email tickets.

Also handled data migrations to/from or within Stripe when customers needed to move sensitive information between processors or to new accounts.

Occasionally worked on internal projects as well such as sample projects, or analytics.

Jun 2013 → Jun 2014 Senior Developer Celebrations
ruby, ruby-on-rails, javascript, coffeescript, backbone, mysql

Pingg was purchased by Celebrations, so my work continued much as it did - usually leaning towards more of the front-end. That means my work can be seen primarily in the design gallery, the designer studio and the invite creation process/main application. I did work on more behind-the-scenes stuff at times - notably, I was responsible for our internal reporting application.

During my final weeks I wrote extensive documentation of the areas I was most familiar, especially the reporting application.

Nov 2008 → May 2013 Web Developer Pingg
git, jquery, actionscript-3, flex, prototype, ruby, ruby-on-rails, mysql, backbone.js, coffeescript

At pingg I was a jack-of-all-trades usually leaning towards more of the front-end. That means my work can be seen primarily in the design gallery, the designer studio and the invite creation process/main application. I also worked on more behind-the-scenes stuff at times, and I was responsible for our internal reporting application as well.

I helped migrate from Subversion to git, prototype to jQuery and have had my hands dirtied by various other high-impact projects (such as Rails upgrades, big releases that fundamentally change the app and pingg's Yahoo! Openmail micro-app).

In September 2012 this position became 100% remote.

Dec 2011 → Mar 2012 Developer Minbox
ruby, ruby-on-rails, sinatra, javascript, coffeescript, backbonejs, jquery

I worked primarily on the front-end of the application with Backbone.js/jQuery (including much of the setup/groundwork), and also spent a fair amount of time with the various Ruby bits on the backend.

Minbox won a bunch of awards and was well received at LAUNCH Festival 2012 in San Francisco.

May 2008 → Aug 2008 Static Code Analyst Research in Motion
python, c, jquery

In the last 4 months of my internship/co-op I moved to the Static Analysis team where I worked on an internal Python framework which, like the testing, ran some nightly tests/analysis products on the codebase and reported on them.

Besides just improving the framework to make it more robust and so on, I also would often work with developers on improving the actual operating system based on results of these tools.

As the framework got solid and was performing consistently I moved into doing some more 'niceties' for people using the data. I re-wrote much of the internal web frontend (Python CGIs) to output graphs, get data via ajax, auto update and so on. In doing this I needed some modifications to the graphing library I was using (called 'flot') and forked it, improved it and maintained it for a while when the original authors weren't active.

May 2007 → Apr 2008 Embedded Systems Test Developer Research in Motion
python, c, ruby, ruby-on-rails

In this position I started off writing tests in Python which were run nightly on a cross section of RIM BlackBerry devices past-to-present. These tests would drop log files with failure/pass information and I would create a report every day on the results of the overall test suite. Occasionally a test would expose a bug of some kind either a new test finding an issue or an old one broken by a recent change, and I would report a bug using internal tools and often confer with the developer working in that area to get it fixed.

The log processing quickly became a cumbersome, monotonous task for me - so I wrote an internal web app with Rails that processed the log files and displayed graphs of results automatically, effectively removing the manual part of my job entirely.

After the first semester (4 months) doing this the primary person on the project left the company, and there was nobody to take over except me. So I became the primary and was responsible for acquiring new devices for, and dropping old devices from, the test runs as well as fixing issues with the various pieces of the setup.

I also co-ordinated the day-to-day tasks of the rest of the automated testing team, some of whom were in a different city.

Education

2005 → 2008 Software Engineering Conestoga College
c, c++, python, django, assembly, 68000, x86, srs, statistics

This was a 3 year program with a 16 month internship between the 2nd and 3rd years. I held 2 positions at Research In Motion over the 16 months. When returning for 3rd year the program had been changed dramatically. I left the program with an overall 3.92 GPA for courses in years 1+2.

Besides the usual kinds of projects completed at school, I took on a web development project for the college's Tech@Work show. It was a Python/Django application (this was pre-1.0!) that supported student team/project registration and management, admin back-end for booth assignment, news, and so on.

Projects & Interests

Aug 2008 → Current Stack Overflow https://stackoverflow.com/users/210/rfunduk
Written 355 answers. Active in ajax, jquery, mongodb, twitter-bootstrap, html and 10 other tags.
Sep 2015 → Current onirim https://github.com/rfunduk/onirim
javascript, es6, reactjs, redux, webpack, react-dnd

Redux/React/Webpack solitaire card game.

Learning project re-creating a cool solitaire card game with fancy new JS ecosystem tools.

Dec 2014 → Current rails-stripe-connect-example https://github.com/rfunduk/rails-stripe-connect-example
ruby, ruby-on-rails, stripe-payments

Example app of various bits and pieces needed to build a Stripe Connect app with Ruby on Rails.

A bare-bones example application demonstrating the various bits and pieces that are needed to get a Stripe Connect application up and running.

Jul 2014 → Current mrpassword https://github.com/rfunduk/mrpassword
coffeescript, backbone.js, gruntjs, handlebars, dropbox-api

A 1PasswordAnywhere-like password vault built on the Dropbox Datastore API.

This is a weekend project to implement a password vault as a client-side only single-page app. It uses the Dropbox Datastore API to store encrypted passwords and a very mobile friendly design (using Twitter Bootstrap).

Mar 2013 → Current jquery-tourbus https://github.com/rfunduk/jquery-tourbus
coffeescript

A jQuery tour/walkthrough plugin.

This is a weekend project I wrote to scratch an itch for a 'developer-oriented' tour library. I was aiming to make 'the backbone.js of web tour libraries'.

I used this on Bugrocket for it's demo account feature.

Feb 2013 → Current auto_error https://github.com/rfunduk/auto_error
ruby, rails-engines, ruby-on-rails

A rails engine for automatic exception handling (and an interface to view them).

I'm working on this project to provide a drop-in way to handle exceptions inside your application. For small projects something like Exceptional is overkill and expensive, and exception_notification is often too noisy and gets filtered out by most people.

Using this engine you can (or, will be able to) simply mount the viewer in your admin panel, still get emails, and have nice error pages all at once without (or, less :)) pain.

So far I've used it on CourseCraft and a few contracts.

Public Artifacts

Never Bind in Render — ryanfunduk.com http://ryanfunduk.com/articles/never-bind-in-render/

There are a lot of tutorials and example code out there that binds event handlers and the like in React render functions. That's not a good idea, and this article explains why :)

Flux from Scratch — ryanfunduk.com http://ryanfunduk.com/articles/flux-from-scratch/

The best way to really learn something is to dig in and get your hands dirty. In this article I implement a Flux-like system from scratch using only plain JavaScript. There's also a part 2 (React from Scratch) and a part 3 (Immutable Data from Scratch).

Rich Page Applications — ryanfunduk.com http://ryanfunduk.com/articles/rich-page-applications/

An alternative style of writing client-heavy applications that doesn't involve routing and other trade-offs/major components of an 'SPA'.

Bugrocket's Rapid(-ish) Development — Bugrocket Blog http://blog.bugrocket.com/rapid-development/

This blog post won MongoDB's March blog contest.

Apps & Software

CourseCraft https://www.coursecraft.net/
aws, ruby, ruby-on-rails, coffeescript, postgresql, backbone.js, stripe-payments, paypal-adaptive-payments

The easiest way to create an e-course and sell it. CourseCraft is half-way between a curated, approval based e-course creator like Udemy and spending time and money setting up a custom blog with access controls and a shopping cart.

It hosts your course, provides tools to write it (along with image/video uploads, etc) and handles payments on your behalf - all for a mere 5% cut of the revenue.

Founder/Primary Developer

Bugrocket - Simple Hosted Bug Tracker for Small Teams https://bugrocket.com/
ruby-on-rails, mongodb, javascript, jquery, haml, less, aws, solr, redis

Bugrocket is a fast, lean, hassle-free bug tracker. Built from the ground up to keep out of your way and let you get back to work.

Founder/Primary Developer

Readings

Hackers & Painters: Big Ideas from the Computer Age Paul Graham http://www.amazon.com/Hackers-Painters-Big-Ideas-Computer/dp/1449389554%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D1449389554
The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master Andrew Hunt, David Thomas http://www.amazon.com/Pragmatic-Programmer-Journeyman-Master/dp/020161622X%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dws%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D020161622X
Programming Perl (3rd Edition) Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Jon Orwant http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Perl-3rd-Larry-Wall/dp/0596000278%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0596000278

While I don't and have never really written much Perl, I found this book really enlightening and worth reading.

Mastering Regular Expressions Jeffrey E.F. Friedl http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Regular-Expressions-Jeffrey-Friedl/dp/0596528124%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIIBINOD46VC3JCLQ%26tag%3Dstackoverfl08-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0596528124

A must for any developer's bookshelf.

Remote: Office Not Required Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson http://www.amazon.co.uk/Remote-Office-Required-Jason-Fried/dp/0804137501

Tools

First Computer: Zenith Z-171 (really)
Favorite Editor: Sublime Text 3 (but vim holds a special place in my heart :))