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5

The System V ABI for x86-64 specifies a red zone of 128 bytes below %rsp. These 128 bytes belong to the function as long as it doesn't call any other function (it is a leaf function). Interrupt handlers need to respect the red zone, since they are effectively involuntary function calls. All of the local variables of your test_function, which is a leaf ...


4

You're on the right track when you mention a hardware feature. This is a feature known as protected mode and was introduced to x86 by Intel on the 80286 model. That evolved and changed over time, and currently x86 has 4 modes. Processors start running in real mode and later a privileged software (ring0, your kernel for example) can switch between these ...


4

By all means, use the intel manuals. For each instruction it gives the machine code and chapter 2 has a very detailed description on the instruction format. But to give you a walkthrough, let's see ADD EDX, [EBX+ECX*4+15h]. First we read through the chapters 2 INSTRUCTION FORMAT and 3.1 INTERPRETING THE INSTRUCTION REFERENCE PAGES to get an idea of what we ...


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I'm not 100% sure, but it looks like your loop destroys xmm0 by converting it to float, so you to have the integer value in xmm1 and then copy over to another register (in this case xmm0). Whilst compilers are known to sometimes issue unnecessary instructions, I can't really see how this is the case in this instance. If you want xmm0 (or xmm1) to remain ...


4

There are a couple of problems with the routine _put_in_mem, it doesn't preserve registers DS and SI which must be preserved according to 16-bit x86 calling conventions, see section 6 of this document, and it doesn't store the character and attribute bytes properly. .global _put_in_mem _put_in_mem: push bp mov bp, sp mov cx, [bp + 4] mov si, [bp + 6] # si ...


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In 32-bit mode, a pointer is 4 bytes, and typically aligned on a 4-byte boundary. So n + 12 is actually loading & n.next to %eax. e.g., if y is an unsigned short, there are 2 bytes of padding in the structure before next. movl 16(%eax),%eax is dereferencing with a 16-byte offset, to give: m = n.next->prev struct node { double x; /* ...


4

Like you said, the Java Compiler generates bytecode. This bytecode then goes into the Java Virtual Machine which magically "makes the code happen". Since the JVM is a specification which has multiple implementation this magical part can be Just In Time compilation or simply interpreting. Related question here. So to answer your question, no, the java ...


3

I was going to pass on this one but this caught my eye: Squares: ;Squares PROTO call Squares So whenever it gets to squares, it will push the return address onto the stack and go to squares again. And again. And again... Until the stack runs out.


3

Make sure it isn't a memory reference accidentally. Since your gdb output seems like at&t, it would normally show a $ for immediates. As such, it's suspicious that what you really have is loading bx with the content of memory at address 0xb800. Can you check the machine code? The machine code is 0xb8001e8b Indeed, that's machine code for loading ...


3

Your kernel.o is in an object file format not understood by objdump so it tries to disassemble everything in it, including headers and whatnot. Try to disassemble the linked output kernel instead. Also objdump might not understand 16 bit code. Better try objdump86 if you have that available. As to why it's not present: you are looking at the wrong place. ...


3

On a normal system, memory protection is enforced at the MMU, or memory management unit, which is a hardware block that configurably maps virtual to physical addresses. Only the kernel is allowed to directly configure it, and operations which are illegal or go to unmapped pages raise exceptions to the kernel, which can then discipline the offending process ...


3

The Java compiler generates byte code in a binary format which is then translated into machine code at runtime by the Java virtual machine (JVM). It is important that this step happens at runtime because that allows Java programs to run on multiple platforms without recompilation. You can observe the bytecode in a class file using the javap utility which is ...


2

The main function of C gets the arguments in a different manner than the first called function of the Linux loader. Recapitulate the declaration of main in C: int main(int argc, char *argv[]) (as mentioned in the standard). The main function will get a value and a pointer to an array of strings, i.e. a pointer to several pointers to a string. Tl;dr: argc: ...


2

By the way, in case anyone else ever comes searching for this same question, I found something after a long search. This is from an errata sheet for the previous edition of the textbook: . . . 12 There is no pseudoinstruction for MIPS with the mnemonic "muli" as listed in the middle of Figure 1.3. . . . So...it's a typo ...


2

You are basically looking for the ability to treat code as data, which is a feature rarely available in compiled imperative static languages like c. The capability of modifying functions at run time is generally categorized as high order functions (you're basically trying to return a function as data somewhere in the code). If the problem can be solved by ...


2

For masm 6.11 the struc name needs to be included: lea dx, (String ptr [bx]).buffer For the other problem, you can't use offset with a base register: mov dx, offset (String ptr [bx]).buffer ; invalid You could use add, but lea does the same thing with one instruction: mov dx, bx add dx, offset (String ...


2

A (full) ARM processor can execute instructions in either ARM or Thumb execution state - roughly speaking, the difference between the versatility of a full 32-bit instruction word, or the code-size efficiency of a more limited 16-bit one. When branching to an address contained in a register, you have the ability to set the ARM or Thumb state with the LSB of ...


2

In situations where you manage to get outside normal program flow and start executing random junk out of memory, it's always useful to have an idea of what the processor thinks is going on - if that last blx returns, you end up executing the data. What does that look like? Well, 'disassembling' arbitrary raw binaries is fun: $ echo '24 f9 03 80' | xxd -r -p ...


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Your strings need to be NUL-terminated so that puts will know where each string ends: LC0 db "TRUE ",0 LC1 db "FALSE ",0


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First of all, these are encoded as two different things - the ADD is an instruction, will come with a full opcode, while the + will be translated by your assembler into referencing mode for the main instruction it's attached to (MOV in this case). The main difference however is that the first will be performed by the memory unit (or more accurately - the ...


2

To go a little more generic, what you are looking at in the first example is part of the addressing mode, not an op-code. The simplest form of address registers is simply a pointer to what you're interested in (the base address) [bx] If you were looking at an array or a structure then you would have to adjust the base register to look at anything else. ...


2

In most cases using %ebp has historical reasons: In 16-bit programs instructions like "movw 2(%sp), %ax" are not supported by x86 CPUs because x86 CPUs only support %bx, %si, %di and %bp registers for memory addressing. So in 16-bit programs you cannot use %sp so you use %bp instead. When using a well-optimizing modern compiler you will not see the "push" ...


2

In terms of x, %al is really only the least significant byte. What you're doing is looking at just "part of x", or the part that contributes values of up to 255 to the total value of x. Might sound vague. One thing this could mean is that x is odd because it has a least significant 1, in which case you don't have to look at x as a whole. I couldn't safely ...


2

The usual advice applies: learn to use a debugger. That said, your problem is that you are comparing CX and AX, which contain the character and the attribute as well. You really want to compare just the character, so use CMP CL, 'C' and CMP AL, 'C' respectively.


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Well, dont know about your puts, but assume it prints till it sees a 0. That's missing in your TRUE/FALSE strings...


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The ds: is a so called segment override prefix. For example, let's say you write down this in your source code (NASM syntax): mov eax, [0x804c220] You did not use a segment prefix, but the assembler will use the default segment for this kind of memory access, the ds (data segment). It will transform your code to this on its own: mov eax, [ds:0x804c220] ...


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My guess is based on this: Also, it's a little difficult to write the FIQ code in C, since you lack a stack :) If there's no stack, that would mean that the compiler is restricted to only using registers for all variables, which I'm not sure how you'd even express. You can put register on all the local variables, but that doesn't mean that the ...


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The equivalent in C is edx += *((int*)0x804a460 + ecx) Looks like it is indexing into a static table to get the value of an entry, then adding that value to edx.


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One note, you need to be more specific on how you do compile things and probably provide minimal example. I know it might not be best answer because of this, but I think it's good enough. It got long but it's because of codes. Bottom line of below work is that it should be safe to leave for the compiler and use appropriate compiler flags. At the bottom I ...


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The normal position-independent "get the address of something" instruction would be simply adr, r0, L._str (which is equivalent to having the assembler/linker automatically calculate an appropriate offset for add r0, pc, #offset). However, since the ARM architecture uses fixed-width encodings - ARM instructions are 32 bits wide, Thumb instructions are either ...



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