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3

As far as I know there is no easy way of doing it. You need to rebuild args manually, like using an array, a loop, and shift: vput() { args=("$1") shift while (( $# )); do args+=("$1=$2") shift 2 done vault kv put "${args[@]}" }


3

One way to do this is to provide a jq function that generates your repeated structure, given the specific inputs you want to modify. Consider the following: # generate this however you want to -- hardcoded, built by a loop, whatever. source_dest_pairs=( sourcebucket1:destinationbucket1 sourcebucket2:destinationbucket2 sourcebucket3:destinationbucket3 )...


2

$(ls -A $test_dir) is being executed locally on the client, not the server. You need to escape the $. You'll also need to use " around it, otherwise the command substitution won't be executed. if [ \"\$(ls -A $test_dir)\" ]; then Often the best way to execute multiline commands is to use scp to copy a script to the remote machine, then use ssh to ...


2

You will have to quote the commands that is to be sent to the server like so: ssh -t -t user@remote-host " if [ -d '/test/dir_test' ]; then sudo chown -R user:admin /test/dir_test/ sudo rm -rf /test/dir_test/* else sudo mkdir /test/dir_test/ fi" Be aware that sudo needs a password unless otherwise specified in its configuration.


2

It's in /usr/bin so change all references from /bin/true to true as it's reasonable to expect /usr/bin to be in the $PATH. That or a load of tedious cross-platform conditional stuff...


2

Try this on command line - awk is great and elegant. ( ensure there are right number of spaces between between the double quotes below - i.e. as as there between id and data1 $ awk -F" " '{print >$1".csv"}' This will create 001.csv, 002.csv etc files Edit based on the comment about skipping the first line - may ways you can do it. Here is one - to ...


2

Avoid parsing the output of ls. Instead, you can get file names with a simple * glob and store them in an array variable: FILES=("$FOLDERNAME"/*) for FILE in "${FILES[@]}"; do echo "$FILE" cat "$FILE" done echo "You have ${#FILES[@]} files in the $FOLDERNAME" An array is nice because it'll preserve any file names that contain spaces or other ...


2

$ pdftk "$(some command)" output t.pdf This runs some command, then the double quotes encapsulate the output into a single "word". No matter what the command, the result will be that pdftk receives a single argument comprising the entirety of the command's output. Parsing ls is generally considered to be a bad idea. As suggested by @RavinderSingh13, ...


1

Considering that you want to merge only 3 files at a time, you could try following, I have tested this on Ubuntu system for 3 files(where it handled file names with space too). You could test it once. pdftk *.pdf output t.pdf


1

Could you please try following(in case you want to concatenate lines of files, line by line with comma). paste -d, *.txt EDIT2: To concatenate all .txt files contents with , try following once(needed GNU awk). awk 'ENDFILE{print ","} 1' *.txt | sed '$d'


1

What about for file in /tmp/test/*.txt; do echo -n "$(cat "$file")," done | sed 's/.$//' or maybe for file in /tmp/test/*.txt; do sed 's/$/,/' "$file" done | sed 's/.$//'


1

You could send commands via stdin with a heredoc: ssh -tt user@remote-host <<EOT if [ -d "/test/dir_test" ]; then sudo chown -R user:admin /test/dir_test/ sudo rm -rf /test/dir_test/* else sudo mkdir /test/dir_test/ fi exit EOT Notice the final exit command.


1

Why not just do; #!/bin/bash grep ">" "$1" >> "out_file." and then call like; ./tool.sh in_file $1 is a positional paramater, meaning the next argument after the script becomes the input file name. If you wanted to allow the user of the script to specify an outout, use the second positional paramater; #!/bin/bash grep ">" "$1" >> "$2"...


1

I guess I just don't understand correctely how does the getopts work but I didn't find any good description. In Bash getopts is a builtin: $ type -a getopts getopts is a shell builtin Its behavior is described in help getopts: $ help getopts getopts: getopts optstring name [arg] Parse option arguments. Getopts is used by shell procedures to ...


1

Even if the data are easy to parse, I advise to use a json parser like jq to extract your json data: <file jq -rR ' split("|")|[ .[0], (.[3]|fromjson|(.label2,.label5,.label6)|tostring)]|join("|")' Both options -R and -r allows jq to accept and display a string as input and output (instead of json data). The split function enable getting all fields ...


1

Since it is about record-based text edits, awk is most probably the best tool to accomplish the task. However, here it is a sed solution: sed 's/\([^|]*\).*label2[^0-9]*\([0-9]*\).*label5[^0-9]*\([0-9]*\).*label6[^0-9]*\([0-9]*\).*/\1|\2|\3|\4/' inputFile


1

You could split with multiple delimiters using a character class. The following prints the desired result: awk 'BEGIN { FS = "[|,:]";OFS="|"} {gsub(/"/,"",$15)}{print $1,$7,$13,$15}' The above solution assumes that the input data is structured.


1

This is an adaptation of this answer: note: I was unable to test this, but you could test this step by step by looking at the output: Normally I would say Never parse the output of ls, but with Hadoop, you don't have a choice here as there is no equivalent to find. (Since 2.7.0 there is a find, but it is very limited according to the documentation) Step 1:...


1

This is where you need to expect -re to capture the output before the prompt: send "cd /Users/username/Documents/folder/\r" expect $prompt send "python pythonscript.py arg1\r" expect -re "(.+)$prompt" set pythonOutput $expect_out(1,string) expect buffers output in the expect_out array, and the array key 1,string (note, no space there) contains the contents ...


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