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6

Conflating a couple of dissimilar issues here static B test2; //error fails because B's constructor requires arguments that haven't been provided and is private so it can't be accessed outside the class. Correct those and B is good to go. class B { public: // added for outside access to constructor B(int a) { printf("%d\n", a); } }; ...


5

template <typename, typename> constexpr bool is_one_of_variants_types = false; template <typename... Ts, typename T> constexpr bool is_one_of_variants_types<std::variant<Ts...>, T> = (std::is_same_v<T, Ts> || ...); template <typename T> auto foo(const T&) -> std::enable_if_t<is_one_of_variants_types<...


5

The issue with your implementation lies in vector A(4); and A.push_back(d); lines. When you construct a vector with default size of 4, it means, A[0] to A[3] indices are already allocated. Next when you are doing push_back(), you are pushing the element in the next possible index, which in your case is 4. Hence, A.push_back(d); -> What it is ...


4

You can write completely a c++ code. If you want to find all the elements satisfying the condition, you can not avoid iterating through the entire vector. But you could use better range-based for-loop instead of index based loop to iterate through the vector, and check wether str.find(substring) == 0(credits @PiotrSkotnicki). Here is the example code: (...


4

"Recursion occurs when a thing is defined in terms of itself or of its type." Thus, a function that calls itself is recursive. A simple loop is not.


4

You can using std::string_view: constexpr auto filename(std::string_view path) { return path.substr(path.find_last_of('/') + 1); } Usage: static_assert(filename("/home/user/src/project/src/file.cpp") == "file.cpp"); static_assert(filename("./file.cpp") == "file.cpp"); static_assert(filename("file.cpp") == "file.cpp"); See it compile (godbolt.org). ...


4

You could use auto, but in general you can use this trick to determine the type B: using outType = decltype(Init(std::declval<A&>())); for your particular case you can also use the simpler format (thanks user max66): using outType = decltype(Init(a)); This allows you to know the type of b without needing to instantiate it. If you need to ...


4

You want compile time integers from 0 to variant's size minus 1, and possibly early exit from iterating over them. There are lots of ways tp get compile time integers. Two of my favorites are generating a tuple of integral constants, or calling a continuation with a parameter pack of integral constants. Taking the tuple of integral constants version, you ...


4

You can recurse through member variables rather than parameters. int LinkedList::getCurrentSize340RecursiveNoHelper() const { if (this->headPtr == nullptr){ return 0; } Node<ItemType> nextNode = this->headPtr->getNext(); if (nextNode != nullptr){ LinkedList<ItemType> restOfList; restOfList.add(...


4

Pretty straight forward in C++17. The maximum value we can calculate with a simple invocation of std::max (the initializer list overload is constexpr since C++14). The result we'll need to plug into a utility that maps sizes to integer types, but that's fairly simple to write now: template<std::size_t N> struct size2Type { static auto ...


3

codecvt_utf8_utf16 does exactly what it says: converts between UTF-8 and UTF-16, both of which are well-understood and portable encodings. codecvt_utf8 converts between UTF-8 and UCS-2/4 (depending on the size of the given type). UCS-2 and UTF-16 are not the same thing. So if your goal is to store genuine, actual UTF-16 in a wchar_t, then you should use ...


3

I'm guessing you've confused digits for numbers. if(s[0] > 2) should be if (s[0] > '2') and if(s[pos + 1] > 5 ) should be if (s[pos + 1] > '5') You also need to think about what happens if s does not contain a colon.


3

There is no suffix for character literals. In C++, you can use '-enclosed literals like '\x9f' (in C they are ints), but there is no way to specify a decimal character code this way.


3

You can using c++20 std::string_view::start_with: std::vector<std::string> v = {...}; std::string_view prefix = "bla"; for (std::string_view sv : v) if (sv.starts_with(prefix)) std::cout << "Item found: " << sv << std::endl;


3

You are doing some weird, C-ish things. Use C++ features. I personally would use a template for run_callback and a lambda for passing the member function: template <class F> void run_callback(F callback) { callback(100); } class A { int x; public: void callback(uint32_t); }; int main() { A foo{}; run_callback([&](uint32_t a)...


3

Is it just telling me ptr1 is now holding some garbage value in it rather than zero? Yes, the value isn't guaranteed to be zero. For default initialization, (emphasis mine) otherwise, nothing is done: the objects with automatic storage duration (and their subobjects) are initialized to indeterminate values. So both the observed results from two ...


3

If I pass mutex object to worker() without reference, it causes compile error That's because std::mutex is a non-copyable class. Why is mutex implemented to be passed to functions using references? There is no reason to pass an object of std::mutex by value (and therefore copying it) as a mutex should be used for mutual exclusion to prevent race ...


2

This is a bug in Visual Studio for modern versions of C++, but it technically isn't a bug for the original release of C++11. First, when I refer to Test, I am talking about your first definition. So that we're clear. By explicitly defaulting Test's move constructor, you have caused the compiler to implicitly delete the copy constructor and assignment ...


2

And want my function foo to be std::enable_if ed if one of V's types are passed (without indicating them explicitly). I suppose you can simply try, inside a decltype(), to emplace() a T value inside a V value. I mean... something as follows #include <variant> #include <type_traits> struct A {}; struct B {}; struct C {}; using V = std::...


2

size_t fread(void * restrict ptr, size_t size, size_t n, FILE * restrict stream); How should a programmer think about using the parameters size and n of fread()? When reading into an array: size is the size of called pointer's de-referenced type. n in the number of elements. some_type destination[max_number_of_elements]; size_t num_read = fread(...


2

In C++, char{28} does what you want. There is no suffix for char (nor for unsigned char) literals. As @JesperJuhl reminds us, you can create your own suffix for char literals, if you so desire, like so: constexpr char operator "" _c(int i) { return char{i}; } and then you could write 123_c which would have type char. But - I wouldn't recommend it, it'd ...


2

Consider the following chain of events after program start: notified_close_table is initialized as false. CloseTable() is executed. This has no precondition. At the end, notified_close_table is set to true (the condition_variable::notify_one() is meaningless at this point). OpenTable() is executed. First, "Open Table" is printed. Then the check in while (!...


2

You just need to elevate the file stream to global status. This could be a global variable, a static member, or (my favorite) a block-local static variable. This approach ensures the file stream won't be opened until its first invocation, and will stay open until program termination. From there you just return the stream by reference. std::ostream &...


2

I finally found the solution to my problem. For anyone interested, I use std::fill and std::for_each: #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <numeric> #include <algorithm> // Compute the sum of the n consecutive items // Ex: {1,2,1,3,2} and n=3 // result: {0,0,4,6,6} std::vector<int> adjacent_sum_n(const std::...


2

You can avoid the inner loop updating the partial sum by just subtracting the first item and adding the new one: #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <algorithm> #include <numeric> template <class T> auto partial_sum_n(std::vector<T> const& src, size_t m) { // Initialize the resulting vector with zeroes ...


2

You misplaced a parenthesis. Should be: distance = sqrt (pow(point2X - point1X, 2) + pow(point2Y - point1Y, 2)); A better way to express this is: xdiff = point2X - point1X; ydiff = point2Y - point1Y; distance = std::sqrt( xdiff * xdiff + ydiff * ydiff); If you have C++11, you can use std::hypot distance = std::hypot ( point2X - point1X, point2Y - ...


2

I don't think there is such a syntax. The documentation says #pragma GCC poison is part of the preprocessor itself; indeed, the GCC documentation doesn't even mention it. That means it only works on things the preprocessor understands, i.e. identifier tokens. Something like A::operator== is four separate tokens: A, ::, operator, ==. Of these you could only ...


2

The vertex array divisor (VERTEX BINDING DIVISOR) is stored in the Vertex Array Objects state vector, separately for each vertex attribute (like enable state, offset, stride etc.). The states which are stored in the VAO are listed in the specification in Table 23.3: Vertex Array Object State. VAOs are specified in OpenGL 4.6 API Core Profile Specification ...


2

All headers should have guards. If header A uses header B, it should include it. If main.cpp directly uses a header, it should include it.


2

Yes, they can share indices. Attribute locations and uniform locations are unrelated.


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