New answers tagged

1

I think it's because the threads are still running. if you try to pause for a second then it prints 0. Like this: import threading import time global lock lock = threading.Lock() class Counter: def __init__(self): self.count = 0 def increment(self, offset): self.count += offset class Writer(object): def __init__(self, counter: ...


0

If the current thread racing for the lock is interrupted,then the if condition will hold true: if (shouldParkAfterFailedAcquire(p, node) && parkAndCheckInterrupt()) interrupted = true; then code in finally block will be executed. Otherwise, it will always be blocked until LockSupport.unpark method is invoked.


0

Better to simplify things. Your class does only some writing, so you can do just as well with a simple function. The w+ mode you are using also truncates the file when opening, so you never see the previous state it was in. The truncate() method needs a number of bytes to truncate to, so I changed that to truncate(0). There's a single lock and it's acquired ...


1

This is happening because the 2 threads does not share the same lock. Try using ThreadPoolExecutor or extend the class as class Writer(threading.Thread): ThreadPoolExecutor takes care of commonly shared resources between the threads itself. So, you don't need to worry about the lock. ThreadPoolExecutor DOCUMENTATION threading: Refer HERE Example of ...


2

The answer @PeterCordes gave was very instructive, but didn't address all of the problem. I'm writing my own answer because I too had to implement a lock-free stack and failed on the reentrancy tests for the pop operation. The implementation given by Mr. Cordes didn't count on the underlying ABA problem. Understanding the reentrancy issue: when you ...


0

From the db2 server perspective, there are a few things you can explore to narrow down the types of locks (and applications) involved in your lock-wait condition: 1) You can gather details on all the lock-wait conditions in the on the database in real-time through monitoring tools like "db2 call monreport.lockwait". You'll need to time this collection right ...


1

There are fundamental problems with this approach. You’re accessing a HashMap, which is not thread safe, before ever entering the synchronized block. If there are updates to the map after its construction, this approach is broken. It’s crucial to use the same object instance for synchronizing when accessing the same data. So even if you used a thread safe ...


0

ReentrantReadWriteLock seems promising, because registerCallback can acquire the read lock, and eventFired the write lock, but that doesn't solve a race condition where registerCallback is invoked, and then eventFired. Registering a callback, in other words, modifying a data structure, while holding a read lock, is never a good idea. You’d need another ...


0

The downside of your solution with sleep(1) is that it still wastes CPU cycles while not being as efficient as it can be. It might take up to a second for another thread to get woken up and to continue processing - which is something we want to avoid in fast programs. You could reduce the sleep interval, e.g. with usleep - but then the program gets less ...


1

The mutex mt is use uninitialised. So the calls to pthread_mutex_lock() and pthread_mutex_unlock() may not work as expected. This would become obvious if the code checked the latter function's return values, like so: if (0 != pthread_mutex_lock(&mt)) { /* Handle and log error here. */ } Handling and logging the error might be done as follows: ...


1

When running your code, I see the names printed in an unpredictable sequence, but I see no mangling like your output suggests. I'm using glibc 2.29-3 on Arch Linux. Edit: I noticed that you are not calling pthread_mutex_init. Incidentally, the uninitialized (zero) mt appears to be lockable on my platform, but it may be causing the issue you are seeing on ...


0

I spent a bunch of time digging into it as a result of facing a problem with too many processor threads. The short story is that bull's concurrency is at a queue object level, not a queue level. If you dig into the code the concurrency setting is invoked at the point in which you call .process on your queue object. This means that even within the same ...


7

canton7's answer is correct, and thanks for the shout-out. I'd like to add a few additional points. This sentence, as is too often the case in the .NET documentation, both chooses to enstructure bizarre word usements, and thoroughly misses the point. For me, the poor word choice that stood out was not "late bound", which merely misses the point. The really ...


0

Try: NSRecursiveLock A lock that may be acquired multiple times by the same thread without causing a deadlock. let lock = NSRecursiveLock() func f() { lock.lock() //Your Code lock.unlock() } func f2() { lock.lock() defer { lock.unlock() } //Your Code }


0

HazelcastInstance hz1 = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance(config); HazelcastInstance hz2 = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance(config); HazelcastInstance hz3 = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance(config); You can add 3 members on the same JVM/node/instance.You should be able to run CPSubsystem without three physical nodes, instances or JVM.


0

I solved the problem this way: This function is the function I want to repeat n times in parallel way: from multiprocessing import Process from multiprocessing import Manager from multiprocessing.pool import Pool def repeat(shared_list, VaR_list, CVaR_list, PSRM_list, i): global RM_list global total_summe_liste copula_sim(runs_sim, rand_x, ...


2

The reason for this issue is because, the list mega_summe_list is not shared between the processes. When you invoke parallel processing in python all the functions and variables are imported and run independently in different processes. So, for instance when you start 5 processes, 5 different copies of these variables are imported and run independently. So,...


0

You should use the Multiprocessing Pool, then you can do something like: p = Pool(10) p.map(repeat, range(10))


2

If you are asking specifically about why the JavaClass objcet is not GC'ed. it probably is (depending on VM parameters). If you are asking why the thread spawned by that object continues to run, it is because it creates a new Thread and runs it. This will only finish when either the run() method finished normally, or System.exit() is called.


1

The line clazz = new JavaClass(); is just assigning new object to your local reference and doesn't destruct previously created object this reference was referred to. This line doesn't guarantee the object is garbage collected. Also object's garbage collection is not necessarily related to thread's lifecycle - your thread can be interrupted or finish its ...


2

You invoked startCustomThread method twice so you have started 2 Threads. From Thread docs : The Java Virtual Machine continues to execute threads until either of the following occurs: The exit method of class Runtime has been called and the security manager has permitted the exit operation to take place. All threads that are not daemon threads ...


1

You have two threads. Thread A is told to run alphonse.bow(gastone), and thread G is told to run gaston.bow(alphonse). Upon entering the bow, each thread acquires a lock. Thread A acquires alphonse's lock, while thread G acquirels gaston's lock. Let's look at thread A. It acquired alphonse's lock, performed the bow, and now it tries to run gastone....


1

The problem is that there are two objects and also that a synchronized method bow calls another synchronized method bowBack on an object that was passed as an argument. So what happens there : Thread 1 acquires instristic lock on alphonse object when calling alphonse.bow() method. Thread 2 acquires instrictic lock on gaston object when calling gaston.bow() ...


1

Thread 1: alphonse.bow(gaston), so Thread 1 acquires the lock of alphonse to be able to call its synchronized method bow Thread 2: gaston.bow(alphonse), so Thread 2 acquires the lock of gaston to be able to call its synchronized method bow Thread 1: bower.bowBack(this);, i.e. gaston.bowBack(alphonse), so thread 1 needs to acquire the lock of gaston to be ...


1

The synchronized keyword implicitly means a lock will be acquired upon entering the method or block. When it is used on a method, it is equivalent to this: public void bow(Friend bower) { synchronized (this) { System.out.format("%s: %s has bowed to me!%n", this.name, bower.getName()); bower.bowBack(this); } } Only one thread ...


2

Package bufio import "bufio" func (*Scanner) Bytes func (s *Scanner) Bytes() []byte Bytes returns the most recent token generated by a call to Scan. The underlying array may point to data that will be overwritten by a subsequent call to Scan. It does no allocation. The underlying array may point to data that will be overwritten by a ...


0

Assign class new attribute with enum type atomic, (as you do). Now when you push object to queue (it should be strong reference to the object) you also add it to cache (key - some identifier and value - another ref to the object). Now when you pop queue - in consumer you need to check this atomic attribute for the value and proceed if that is correct (not ...


0

No swift doesn't have any of those grantees when using the normal blocks so you'd need to implement a locking mechanism by yourself to guarantee data integrity and solve race conditions yourself. Here's a sample code which you can try yourself in a playground and you can see the results are conforming to any of the expected outputs out of the loops as both ...


0

Ok. Let`s write some code. create separate exception for OptimisticConcurrency public class OptimisticConcurrencyException : Exception { } create Counter class public class Counter { [BsonId] public ObjectId Id { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } public long Version { get; set; } public DateTime Ddate { get; set; } } ...


1

Question1: How to actually ensure that these items run in parallel. Is using TLP (task parallel library) an option, if yes how to use it. Using the TPL would be the best option but it does matter whether your process is IO bound or CPU bound. In simple terms if the process is purely a CPU time consuming operation then you're CPU bound, otherwise if you you'...


4

The equivalent remark for Interlocked.Exchange(object, object) is: Beginning with .NET Framework 2.0, the Exchange<T>(T, T) method overload provides a type-safe alternative for reference types. We recommend that you call it instead of this overload. Although I haven't heard it used in this way before, I think by "late-bound" it simply means "non ...


0

you can handle it by using optimistic concurrency approach the algo can be like: you find Counter with the name == counterName build your filter like var filter = new FilterDefinitionBuilder<Counter>().Where(x => x.name == counterName && x.sequenceValue == c.sequenceValue ); try to find and update and if the result is null retry


1

Semaphores are act like thread limiters. Example: If you have a pool of 100 threads and you want to perform some DB operation. If 100 threads access the DB at a given time, then there may be locking issue in DB so we can use semaphore which allow only limited thread at a time.Below Example allow only one thread at a time. When a thread call the acquire() ...


0

import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue; import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue; public class prodConsumeJava8 { public static void main(String[] args) { BlockingQueue<Integer> que=new LinkedBlockingQueue<>(); final Runnable singleproducer = () ->{ try { for (int i =...


1

For the question, is it possible to use the parallel gem with find_each? I cannot find anything in their documentation or examples online doing such. Is there another solution I can do to for iterating over the Customers concurrently? I would recommend you to use find_in_batches by Activerecord. You can query for a batch of records and then iterate over ...


1

Yes. Because Singleton means there is only one MyController instance which means there is only one List<String> errors. If multiple threads (as each HTTP request run on a thread) manipulate the data on the same list , they will probably mess up with each other. That 's why you should move the error list to the private variable inside each controller ...


1

I am going to stick to answering the question you asked instead of trying to do your homework for you. I hope that is enough to get your started trying things out for yourself. Recall that class names should be capitalized. That is probably a good thing to remember as your instructor will probably mark you down if you forget that during an exam. class ...


0

Spawning more threads than your computer has cores is very much possible. Could be as simple as: import threading all_urls = [your url list] def threadfunction(url): cap_vid = cv2.VideoCapture(url) while True: # ... # openCV operations # file I/O operations # ... for stream_url in all_urls: threading.Thread(...


0

After reading the comments and some online resources the following approach seems to work fine so far. The first 8 minutes in this video was quite helpful to understand the concept. The defer close(ch) is something I'm uncertain, though. package main import "strings" func SendFile(ch chan string) { for filePath := range ch { //upload file here } } ...


2

Your code is fine. The TryAdd will only succeed if the TryRemove has completed. The only odd thing you may see is that after the TryRemove returns the thread (lets call it T1) is suspended, and then another thread (lets call that T2) calls your method. It may execute the entire method before T1 resumes execution, so your logging could become intertwined.


1

You are writing one string to the channel, and reading it back. The sendFile() runs in a different goroutine, but there is no need for the channel in the way you're using it. You could simply do fname:= SaveToFile(uartData) go SendFile(fname) However, I don't think this is what you want to do. Instead, you should have a goroutine in which you read data ...


0

With help of concurrent-ruby you can process data concurrently: require 'net/http' require 'concurrent-ruby' class Browser include Concurrent::Async def render_page(link) sleep 5 body = Net::HTTP.get( URI.parse(link) ) File.open(filename(link), 'w') { |file| file.puts(body)} end private def filename(link) "#{link.gsub(/\W/, '-'...


1

Answering myself because of all the confusion. Yes, it is safe to use the read lock of sync.RWMutex for writing and its write lock for reading if the writes never race with each other. Example: package main import ( "fmt" "sync" "time" ) func main() { m := &sync.RWMutex{} wg := &sync.WaitGroup{} maxWriters := 5 wg.Add(...


1

The answer of your question is Yes, just like Volker said. I would give you a more idiomatic Go solution: every resources of goroutines in S take a sync.RWMutex the goroutines in S read after sync.RWMutex.Rlock() the goroutines in S write after sync.RWMutex.Lock() extra goroutine R read after sync.RWMutex.Rlock() I think you just go into the wrong region, ...


0

This is too late but for future lookups: spring batch uses a jpa repository to synchronize jobs, so you can avoid concurrency.


0

Some points regarding your current test case: On the initial map insertion, a call to #resize is made to construct the table. This isn't done in construction, so there's a potential race condition there. Continuing from above, I'd suspect that something akin to map.entrySet().stream().count() would return 999 or 1000, depending on if the race condition was ...


0

There are at least a couple of options: You can create a stored procedure which wraps the INSERT operation in a transaction: begin tran select to see if there is an existing record you can: - invalidate the previous record - insert a new record or - raise an error commit tran catch error rollback tran You can ...


0

Assuming that >CTC14_18758|M00842:336:000000000- is on a separate line, this code will convert the input to the output. #!/bin/sed -f #skip blank lines /^[[:space:]]*$/n #change >CTC14_18758|M00842:336:000000000- # to >Sample-CTC14_Read18758 s/^>/>Sample-/ s/_/_Read/ /^>/s/|.*$// # remove 2ndary header # C7WWK:1:1108:17474:5670:0:66|o:...


0

As of Python 3.7, both the ThreadPoolExecutor and the ProcessPoolExecutor have the optional initializer and initargs arguments. Each thread/process will call initializer(*initargs) after starting. See https://docs.python.org/3.7/library/concurrent.futures.html .


0

Yes, it is safe, the httpcontext.current read the data from the execution context of associated thread, when you invoke GetProfileId in a normal way, I think there will be none conflict.


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