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It's not completely clear what you're doing. Try returnVALUE.map { case '1' => "one" case '2' => "two" case '3' => "three" // ... case _ => " " }.mkString and this should be the last line of toString. String#map accepts a function from Char to something (e.g. to String). If returnVALUE is "1 2 3" then this produces "one two three"...


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A for comprehension without the yield clause doesn't create any results. It can only be used for side effects, which good Scala programmers try to avoid. Maybe something like this. val numberNames = Map(0 -> "zero", 1 -> "one", 2 -> "two").withDefaultValue("too big") val result = List(2,0,1,4).map(numberNames) //result: List[String] = List(two, ...


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You only need GC.SuppressFinalize(this); and a destructor if you are working with unmanaged memory. If not you can safely omit this. In your Dispose implementation call this.IDisClassInstance?.Dispose();, that is all you need. Your code can be condensed down to this. class BaseClass : System.IDisposable { public virtual void Dispose() { //...


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Consider you are an author of a class A, which does simple sorting of objects in ascending order by any attribute of the object. Say, class B and C, use that functionality to process the list in certain way. Class B is strict and it wants sorting of objects in ascending order only. Class c, does not except the list on particular order. Now, you make change ...


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Even though this is tagged "Java", I'm going to give a broader answer. Coupling is expressed in terms of what assumption module A makes when it uses module B. The more assumptions module A makes, the more it is coupled with module B. A module's API is basically the set of assumptions its consumers can make. Return type or method signature are just ...


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You can make buildGroup accept Collection<? extends T> and Function<? super T, Integer> so that it can use a function to map collection elements to integers: public <T> List<T> buildGroup( Collection<? extends T> entities, Function<? super T, Integer> property, int from, int to, int sum ) { ...


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The latter example is eager - ClientFactory is always created. It can be a drawback, when there is a low possibility, that ClientFactory will be used and instantiation of it is costly. The first one is lazy. That means, that when ClientFactory is not used, it's not being created at all. Besides ClientFactory is immutable, whereas a public field can be ...


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Using FactoryMethod like getInstance() gives you more options for future changes. E.g. Lazy loading Replacing the actual class with one of its proxy Replacing class with one of its children (if one day ClientFactory evolve into abstract classes with different child implementation), etc.


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As others correctly pointed out main difference between those two appraches is that first approach will use lazy instantiation whereas in second one the object is created eagerly. The ClientFactory field in the second apprach should be marked final to avoid letting clients of this class to reaasign this field. Also the first approach uses synchronized which ...


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You could do it either way, but since you want to make a simple chat app, then you should probably use HTTP to send messages and a web socket to receive channel updates. On both the client and server side, this will avoid complexities involved in multiplexing both inbound and outbound events over the same connection. This often turns out to be non-trivial, ...


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Each property has 2 possibilities, so you could store them in a bit-field as 0 or 1. For example: unsigned char type = (color << 0) | (size << 1) | (shape << 2) | (thickness << 3) where each value is a 0 or 1. Let's say: enum Color { BLACK = 0, WHITE = 1 }; enum Size { SHORT = 0, TALL = 1 }; enum Shape { CIRCLE = 0, SQUARE = 1 }; ...


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If you only have a handful of traits, and they're fundamental to your business model, it's totally reasonable to have to change more than one class when you add a new trait or want to change the type of behavior of one of those traits. However, if you're trying to come up with a model that can handle dynamically adding different types of traits to your ...


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The cast protected abstract T self(); public T setPrice(double price) { Stuff.this.price = price; return (T) self(); } self() already returns T. The cast is unnecessary. Unresolved methods public abstract class Stuff { // ... protected abstract class Builder<T extends Builder> { Builder is a generic type, but ...


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You could use a lock that only unlocks every 1.5 seconds: let lock = Promise.resolve(); let aquireLock = () => (lock = lock.then(() => new Promise(res => setTimeout(res, 1500)))); Then await aquireLock(); // will only run every 1.5 seconds


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Using Provider (or any library that implements BloC pattern) and a Repository Pattern should work to move/store data locally. Basically each Bloc/Provider gets an instance of the repository and read/write values to it. Because the repository instance is the same always, you will have all yout data updated. Also, you can use a local database like SQLite (...


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Using provider to apply the BLoC pattern and combining it with RxDart is a way of solving this. You could, for example, create an AppBloc: class AppBloc { StreamController<UserInputState> _userInputController = BehaviorSubject<UserInputState>.seeded(UserInputState('NOTHING')); StreamSink<UserInputState> get userInputSink => ...


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Interesting question. The quote from "Uncle Bob" Martin is: A class should have one, and only one, reason to change. One could interpret this as saying that your Person class has five reasons to change: you might want to change the eat method, or change the walk method, or the breathe method, or the run method, or the driveTheCar method. But this is too ...


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What is a reason to change For the above class who is the actor/Person who can be responsible for change? An Actor is: a user (including clients, stakeholders, developers an organizations) or an external system. We can argue if people are systems, yet that is nor here nor there. See also: Use case. Wouldn't any change in the logic of eating, ...


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You're relying on both static and dynamic binding, but at least one of these is hurting your code unnecessarily: abstract Parent.doActionWith(Parent) allows you to achieve two things: When implemented in ChildA, ChildB, and ChildC, the behavior can be customized to fit exactly what's desired in those sub-classes. This is the benefit of dynamic binding. ...


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